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US citizenship via US Army


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
12 May 2011  #1
Poles and other non-citizens can obtain fast.track US citizenship by fighting for good ol' Uncle Sam. Any takers on PF?

Poles living in America are being offered a fast-track to full US citizenship if they sign up for the army. As many as twenty Poles have died already fighting in a US uniform in Afghanistan and Iraq.

thenews.pl/international/artykul155120_--us-citizenship-in-exchange-for-fighting-in-afghanistan.html
gumishu 11 | 5,012
12 May 2011  #2
Poles and other non-citizens can obtain fast.track US citizenship by fighting for good ol’ Uncle Sam. Any takers on PF?

I thought only the green card holders were able to apply
David_18 68 | 982
12 May 2011  #3
I guess its a good deal for the US, but for the Poles? I dont think so...

I would rather join the French Foreign Legion then fight for the US.
Ironside 48 | 9,704
12 May 2011  #4
I would rather join the French Foreign Legion then fight for the US.

The pay is a pretty similar.....
Piast Poland 3 | 182
12 May 2011  #5
Why fight for an corporate imperialist security firm?
Ironside 48 | 9,704
12 May 2011  #6
Well, for the money,citizenship and fun ......
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
12 May 2011  #7
I don't know if I understand this.

For one, you obviously already must be a legal resident to do this. If you have your greencard, it's just a matter of time before you get your citizenship, assuming you don't do anything stupid. I guess if you got to the USA on a greencard and didn't really have any career paths lined up or much going for you, it could be an option but most people from Poland going to the USA with a greencard are there due to marriage to an American which means they'd have to up and leave their spouse for 4 years......
Piast Poland 3 | 182
12 May 2011  #8
Well, for the money,citizenship and fun

there are better countries for that
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
12 May 2011  #9
Piast Poland wrote:

there are better countries for that

do other countries offer this? I honestly have no idea.
Ironside 48 | 9,704
12 May 2011  #10
there are better countries for that

You mean France? No combat zones at the moment.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
12 May 2011  #11
Why fight for an corporate imperialist security firm?

That's no way to describe 'the land of the free and the home of the brave', the world's arsenal of democracy which spends more money on helping less fortunate countries (through foreign aid of various types) than any other.
Ironside 48 | 9,704
12 May 2011  #12
there are better countries for that

Maybe you mean: /blackwater.jpg

fuzz:

They want to gain American citizenship. American recruiters recruit foreigners with green cards, mostly Latinos and Poles. Already 20 Poles have died in Iraq and Afghanistan - reported by " Gazeta Wyborcza" .
convex 20 | 3,978
12 May 2011  #13
That last part on that link is very interesting...

"Polscy eksperci przypominają, że obywatele Polski nie mogą służyć w armiach innych państw bez zgody MSWiA. Walka w obcym mundurze bez zezwoleniato przestępstwo zagrożone karą 5 lat więzienia."

5 years in the pokey for Poles that join a foreign military?
Ironside 48 | 9,704
12 May 2011  #14
5 years in the pokey for Poles that join a foreign military?

It had never been a real barrier.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
12 May 2011  #15
What if the Pole is married? Will their spouse also be on the fast track to citizenship? What about their children?
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
12 May 2011  #16
I know a lawyer who works for the US Navy on immigration issues (he works for us, too, and is really good). It's not an Afghanistan thing, or even a recent thing, either.

You have to have a green card (the card is not really green, btw, it's more of a pinkish color...) in the first place. The "fast track" means they'll do the paperwork for you, which might save you a couple hours, and send it in for faster processing, which might save you a couple weeks of wait time. You still need to meet all the criteria as everyone else, and pass the civics test, etc.

As for spouses and children - you have to be a permanent resident for a certain number of years before you can apply for citizenship, I don't remember if it's three or five. If your wife has had her green card for that long, and you're still in the military, and you're buddies with the lawyer, he or she will probably help you with the stuff for you spouse, too. With children, it depends. If they're born in the US, they're citizens. If not, it's the same story, although naturalization for children is a much easier process.

It's a nice benefit IF you're in the military already (and there are a lot of immigrants there) but I doubt anyone will enlist just for that.

what was it about the 5 years in jail?
convex 20 | 3,978
12 May 2011  #17
what was it about the 5 years in jail?

Polish law apparently calls for sentences of up to 5 years in prison if a Polish citizen willingly joins a foreign military without permission.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
12 May 2011  #18
thanks

Oh, I see. I think other countries have that sort of thing, too. I can see the rationale behind it but it's not enforceable at all, both from a practical standpoint as well as official foreign relations.

I know Polish people serving in the US military who went back to Poland to visit (as well as file some official paperwork with the local authorities) the and nobody cared about their military service as far as I know, although perhaps the German army would have a lot more Polish people enlisted, and I don't know anyone, whether they have issues or not.

Besides, if you think about it from the perspective of the individual, they're here for a new life, they already left Poland behind probably a while ago, the US military does offer pretty good opportunities (if you're ok with the fighting part, of course), and it's a very respectable occupation, too, I don't think that regulation is much of a deterrent, in real life.
guesswho 4 | 1,289
12 May 2011  #19
I would rather join the French Foreign Legion then fight for the US.

and what kind of privileges would you have of it other then not serving for the country you hate so much?
convex 20 | 3,978
12 May 2011  #20
I can see the rationale behind it but it's not enforceable at all, both from a practical standpoint as well as official foreign relations.

It's completely enforceable. I'm guessing it would be used in conjunction with some other charge as opposed to on its own.

There is an easy way to make it legal, tell the ministry of interior your intentions. I'm guessing most people don't...
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
12 May 2011  #21
I'm guessing it would be used in conjunction with some other charge

Likely so, yes. If one goes back to Poland and gets in trouble somehow, they might stick it on top of their sentence, if one gets convicted, but the optics of it might not be the most positive, and I can see the authorities being reluctant to do that. I guess it would depend on the nature of the charge, too, and whether the military in question is for a current enemy.

On a day to day basis, I can't imagine the Polish border patrol asking for people's resumes in addition to their passports.
sobieski 107 | 2,129
12 May 2011  #22
What is the difference in this case with being mercenaries?
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
12 May 2011  #23
I'm not sure I know what you're asking about, regarding mercenaries. Can you elaborate?
sobieski 107 | 2,129
12 May 2011  #24
Yes of course. A mercenary fights for money. These guys fight for the US (their choice of course) because they get paid with US citizenship. Where is the difference? Would they do it otherwise as well?

If I am not mistaken Foreign Legion soldiers can get French citizenship after ending their contract. Interesting to note that Poles are the 6th largest contingent in the Foreign Legion.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
12 May 2011  #25
Would they do it otherwise as well?

Probably. As I already explained (and so did Fuzzy), you have to have a green card to join the military in the first place. Which means you're already a permanent resident. The citizenship itself is not so difficult to achieve at this point already, it's only a matter of time and some paperwork. The military saves you doing the paperwork yourself and a little bit of time.

There are multiple reasons why people join the military:
1. they're always hiring
2. it's a job with training and benefits and, as such, a good opportunity for a lot of young kids who wouldn't get that someplace else, or might not have money for college

3. being in the military is extremely respected here
4. sometimes kids plain don't know what they want to do, the military gives them a direction and a chance for moving up in a career.

I don't know much about the foreign legion.
tygrys 2 | 294
12 May 2011  #26
Polish law apparently calls for sentences of up to 5 years in prison if a Polish citizen willingly joins a foreign military without permission.

No, you don't understand the text. It says 5 years in prison if you put on a uniform of a foreign country without permission, and then fight for that country in another uniform

If you have your greencard, it's just a matter of time before you get your citizenship,

Not if it's a 2 year "conditional" green card which is based on marriage.

you have to be a permanent resident for a certain number of years before you can apply for citizenship, I don't remember if it's three or five.

5 years if not married, 3 years if married to US citizen.

I guess its a good deal for the US, but for the Poles? I dont think so...

Really? If so why are there visas for Poland?
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
12 May 2011  #27
Not if it's a 2 year "conditional" green card which is based on marriage.

you're right, I forgot about that.
convex 20 | 3,978
12 May 2011  #28
No, you don't understand the text. It says 5 years in prison if you put on a uniform of a foreign country without permission, and then fight for that country in another uniform

So the stipulation is that you have to be involved in combat? If you're stationed stateside and don't see combat, you're ok...and if you're deployed, you're in violation?
Ironside 48 | 9,704
12 May 2011  #29
No, author of the article is a retard, poor choice of words. You were right the first time convex.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
12 May 2011  #30
sobieski wrote:

A mercenary fights for money.

All US soldiers are paid a salary including free health benefits while they're in and money for college when they get out.

tygrys wrote:

Not if it's a 2 year "conditional" green card which is based on marriage.

Every greencard is "conditional". Like I said, if you don't do anything stupid, you'll get your citizenship.

tygrys wrote:

Really? If so why are there visas for Poland?

OH NO YOU DIT-INT! Nice going, tygrys. This entire thread officially is ruined.


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