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Western Europe is not Paradise after all (Polish doctors in the UK more popular)


Wroclaw Boy
30 Jun 2013 #61
The medical system in the UK wherebye everything gets filtered through a local GP (Doctor) is absolutely shocking, i much prefer the Polish system where you have a choice of affordable private or (on the state) health care.

Having said that, in the UK when you finally get to the required specialist for a serious illness like cancer the treatment is then more than suitable.

My daughter was recently perscibed antibiotics upon antibiotics for recurring tonsilitis, this contstant dose caused other problems such as mouth thrush, gingivites and other nasty ***** as the antibiotics were killing the healthy bacteria. This was a real problem as we were looking at having the tonsils removed which can result in death through blood loss. We instantly pulled her out of school and built up her immune system naturally for three months solid, lots of probiotics, healthy foods, hardly any contact with other children. She has been fine for over 6 months now. This was one hell of a lesson for us - antibiotics as a last resort only.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,862
30 Jun 2013 #62
you are right WB - they are vicious meds that many people do not really understand
Paulina 16 | 4,357
30 Jun 2013 #63
He added: 'You have heard the stories about people going to GPs and whatever is wrong with you they give you a paracetamol and tell you to go away.

My friend living in London told me about it! xD I thought she was joking or sth...

She also told me that she was amazed at what the visits at GP look like - you go in, tell about your symptoms and the doctor... types them into the internet... and bases the diagnosis on what he/she finds there... o_O As you can imagine she had a better opinion about Polish GPs.

(Now, before you jump on her - she's an Anglophile, she loves the language and went to the UK not because she had to but because she wanted to).

And, yes, we are all acutely aware of the problems with health care in Poland, so don't bother :P I'm just repeating what she said, so don't kill the messenger ;)

Yes. Many times more.

Jon, I've lived in Poland all my life and I have never met a drunk doctor or a nurse. Seriously. Never.

It would make a lot of sense - it's a well known phenomenon that some elderly people see the doctor as a social life.

Yes, doctors complain about it.

It is far from unimaginable in Warsaw. Here, when using a private clinic (in my case Medicover) it is very unusual to get an appointment for a GP the same day

I always can get to the doctor in my przychodnia the same day. Unless it's a flu season then you have to be usually very early to get in.

My daughter was recently perscibed antibiotics upon antibiotics for recurring tonsilitis, this contstant dose caused other problems such as mouth thrush, gingivites and other nasty ***** as the antibiotics were killing the healthy bacteria.

You should always take probiotics when you take antibiotics!

I've read articles saying that antibiotics are being prescribed too often, that's nothing new, but now I googled and found something funny:

kobieta.pl/drukuj/artykul/ostroznie-z-antybiotykami

Dr Hanna Orłowska: Rzeczywiście, są lekarze, którzy zbyt często wypisują antybiotyki, zwłaszcza jeśli rodzic nalega. Tymczasem nie wszystkie zakażenia bakteryjne wymagają antybiotykoterapii. Ale to problem nie tylko nasz, w Wielkiej Brytanii antybiotyki stosowane są jeszcze powszechniej.

Dr Hanna Orłowska is saying that there are doctors in Poland who prescribe antibiotics too often and she adds that the use of antibiotics is even more common in the UK o_O

So what's the truth?
Wroclaw Boy
30 Jun 2013 #64
You should always take probiotics when you take antibiotics!

Apparenty thats common knowledge in Poland, not so much in the UK as we discovered.

The bribery system in Poland is appauling though - for the 'have nots'.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,163
30 Jun 2013 #65
The bribery system in Poland is appauling though - for the 'have nots'.

What I gather about Poland is that the bribery system works in a strange way - doctors are often given 'presents' that they don't even ask for at times.

I've always thought that Poland needs to introduce a blanket "no presents" for anyone working in the public sector. No flowers, nothing - it's the only way to get rid of the problem.

But certainly, for me, GP care is far, far superior in Poland than in the UK. I remember the last years of living there - I had to tell the worst lies to even to get an same day appointment, whereas here, there's no reason at all to lie.
OP pawian 222 | 24,365
30 Jun 2013 #66
No flowers, nothing - it's the only way to get rid of the problem.

Hmm, I can`t give up such presents as whisky, wine, beer and sweets.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,163
30 Jun 2013 #67
Pawian, how do you do it? I only got flowers and sweets :(
jon357 74 | 22,030
30 Jun 2013 #68
Jon, I've lived in Poland all my life and I have never met a drunk doctor or a nurse. Seriously. Never.

Perhaps not, but I can assure you I wasn't dreaming. Amazing that the nurses didn't lock him in the room and call the police, but no, they were letting him see patients!
Paulina 16 | 4,357
30 Jun 2013 #69
What I gather about Poland is that the bribery system works in a strange way - doctors are often given 'presents' that they don't even ask for at times.

Yes, my mum gave coffee to the nurses when my grandma was at the hospital. She thought that thanks to that they would take better care of her, which I think is silly, but that's a communist mentality. It will probably change with next generations. I wouldn't give a bribe or "a present" to a doctor or a nurse, it would be too embarrassing for me... lol

Perhaps not, but I can assure you I wasn't dreaming. Amazing that the nurses didn't lock him in the room and call the police, but no, they were letting him see patients!

Well, you can hear about such cases on the news on TV sometimes, so it's not like it doesn't happen at all lol, but I've never experienced it myself and I don't think anyone I know has either.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,163
30 Jun 2013 #70
Yes, my mum gave coffee to the nurses when my grandma was at the hospital. She thought that thanks to that they would take better care of her, which I think is silly, but that's a communist mentality. It will probably change with next generations. I wouldn't give a bribe or "a present" to a doctor or a nurse, it would be too embarrassing for me... lol

Likewise. I can understand coming afterwards with a small gift to say thank you - but during? Absolutely no way.

I remember one night getting more treatment than I wanted, but that's another story...
OP pawian 222 | 24,365
30 Jun 2013 #71
Pawian, how do you do it? I only got flowers and sweets :(

I get serious presents from private students (especially when I don`t rise the prices) while only flowers from school kids. :):):) And yes, once a got a leather bag from my class who was leaving school. Parents had decided so, nobody had consulted me and I could do nothing but to accept it.

I can understand coming afterwards with a small gift to say thank you - but during? Absolutely no way.

Yes.
I never accepted presents from uni students before giving them exams - that would be an obvious bribe.
WielkiPolak 56 | 1,008
30 Jun 2013 #72
i am a fool? an you are a big suck baby hypochondriac

Well done on your Chemistry knowledge. What do you want, a cookie? Man people really don't have much to do with their life, if they feel the need to go and launch a scathing attack on someone over the internet, and rage about how they don't deserve any antibiotics.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,862
30 Jun 2013 #73
and some people obviously have even less to do with their lives if they want to write an extensive post
on the nasty ignorant doctor who sent you away with no antibiotics, lol
WielkiPolak 56 | 1,008
1 Jul 2013 #74
I believe that this is a general topic on that, so my post was in the right place. Your attack on me is not as easy to understand though. Whether I did or did not deserve to get antibiotics seems to bother you a lot.
OP pawian 222 | 24,365
2 Jul 2013 #75
My wife just called, she took our medium son to hospital, the foot he sprained yesterday is already in plaster for a week. She is going to buy a pair of crutches for 37 zlotys.

After a week, we came back to hospital for plaster removal by the kid surgeon. Registration, 1 hour waiting, first examination and removal, going to have another X-ray taken, second examination. We spent 2 hours and I was really impressed by their eifficiency. One novelty (I haven`t been to hospital for a long time) which I observed: they send X-rays over hospital network, but we got our CD anyway (the problem is I can`t open it at home).

Not bad.


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