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Long-term impact of returning UK Poles to Poland


Sandman 3 | 28
11 Nov 2010 #1
I know that the UK-bound emigration is not over yet. The economy will keep Poles in the UK for at least a few more years. But my estimation is that ultimately about 3/4 of them will return within the next 10 years. 3/4 of a million is a sizable chunk of people. So what cultural/societal impact will those returning UK Poles have on Poland? None, as in "we only went there for the money"? Or will the UK experience affect Poland? Will ex-UK Poles bring secular trends with them, so that church attendance in Poland will drop down to Western levels in 20 years? Will they bring British names with them, so that 20 years from now Poland will have plenty of boys called Colin Kaczmarek and Sean Bartkowiak, and girls called Vanessa Sadowska and Samantha Kasprzyk? The mind wonders...
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
11 Nov 2010 #2
what is the point in predicting this? It is going to turn out differently anyways. You can control the future. Predictions are useless really since they are not based on reality, but rather speculations, unless one is a scientist, but even then - it is not precise.
Torq 32 | 2,897
11 Nov 2010 #3
Will they bring British names (...) Sean Bartkowiak

I think Sean is an Irish name, not British. The fact that some Irish lands are currently
under British occupation and some people named Sean live there, doesn't mean that
Sean is a British name.

I am quite sure that in Prussian occupied Poland there were men with names like Władysław,
Gniewomir or Bogusław, but it doesn't mean that these are German names.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
11 Nov 2010 #4
I think Sean is an Irish name

You think correctly.

There are however quite a few British people with Irish names - even if they don't have a connection with Ireland.
Wroclaw Boy
11 Nov 2010 #5
But my estimation is that ultimately about 3/4 of them will return within the next 10 years.

I would say maybe 15% within 10 years will return and actually live in Poland permanently. If it hasnt happened yet what makes you think it will in the future? Its been a good 5 years already since the mass migration.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
11 Nov 2010 #6
So what cultural/societal impact will those returning UK Poles have on Poland

Hopefully cricket and rugby(:
DarrenM 1 | 77
11 Nov 2010 #7
Cricket .... Good lord no.

Rugby Union is already alive and growing in Poland
Harry
11 Nov 2010 #8
Colin Kaczmarek and Sean Bartkowiak, and girls called Vanessa Sadowska and Samantha Kasprzyk? The mind wonders...

It would be illegal for Polish parents to name their son Colin or Sean, or their daughter Vanessa (especially with that illegal letter!)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
11 Nov 2010 #9
It would be illegal for Polish parents to name their son Colin or Sean

that law changed some time ago i believe.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
11 Nov 2010 #10
Well turn the question around, have the Poles in the U.K. effected the U.K. culture?
Will Brits be naming their kids after Polish names? Are the Brits going to church more?
I doubt it, although I can never be too sure, after all people usually prefer to go to church with other people.

I think the only thing that will really change and you surprisingly left it out, is that the work experience they bring back will hopefully change business practices here in Poland.

It would be illegal for Polish parents to name their son Colin or Sean, or their daughter Vanessa (especially with that illegal letter!)

Liar ;)
I don't know if it was the case but it certainly isn't any more.

There are however quite a few British people with Irish names

Such a large portion of Brits are of Irish descent, mainly due to emigration from Ireland, that a healthy percentage of Brits have some good in them;p
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
11 Nov 2010 #11
None, as in "we only went there for the money"? Or will the UK experience affect Poland?

I think nothing will change rapidly. It was good lesson for us. We still want driving fast without speed cameras on our back and feel safe on the street without looking around for a bottle, knife or screwdriver. We will appreciate more what we have here in Poland.
resident 1 | 27
11 Nov 2010 #12
It would be illegal for Polish parents to name their son Colin or Sean, or their daughter Vanessa (especially with that illegal letter!)

another great Harry lie. You are so entrenched in the 1970s it's hard to believe. As much as you don't like it, Poland is moving forward, live with it.
jonni 16 | 2,485
11 Nov 2010 #13
Edyta Gorniak was accused of breaking the law about five years ago, for giving her baby a non-Polish name, despite both parents being Polish. So when did the law change?
OP Sandman 3 | 28
11 Nov 2010 #14
I think the only thing that will really change and you surprisingly left it out, is that the work experience they bring back will hopefully change business practices here in Poland.

I was mostly interested in the cultural aspects (hence "cultural/societal"), but feel free do discuss business / economy. One thing I obviously forgot is the knowledge of English as a second language. Seems to me it'll be far more widespread than it would've been otherwise.
resident 1 | 27
11 Nov 2010 #15
Edyta Gorniak was accused of breaking the law about five years ago, for giving her baby a non-Polish name, despite both parents being Polish. So when did the law change?

That I can't tell. However I have a Polish god-daughter called Amelie, it became a very popular name among 'trendy' couples after the hit film. That was what, eight years back? Poland's changed, Harry hasn't.
resident 1 | 27
11 Nov 2010 #17
because I really can't be bothered to waste my Thursday evening rooting through legalities. However, I think the fact that so many children nowadays are being handed blatantly un-Polish names speaks for itself?
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
11 Nov 2010 #18
because I really can't be bothered to waste my Thursday evening rooting through legalities.

And you call yourself a lawyer?

Even one of my students (who is almost a lawyer, but not quite) could tell me about various aspects of law without needing to "root through legalities" - so why can't you?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
11 Nov 2010 #19
So when did the law change?

about twelve years ago. but this is Poland so problems still exist
resident 1 | 27
11 Nov 2010 #20
And you call yourself a lawyer?

there are different branches of law, maybe you're aware? Real estate is a little different...
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
12 Nov 2010 #21
How will returning UK Poles affect Poland? Well, how well do Poles integrate into English society? How well do the English accept the Polish immigrants?

Poles in UK and their future

Why the uk love poles... because we get married and have kids and......

New UK figures released by the ONS (Office for National Statistics) report that by the end of this year, pensioners will outnumber children for the first time (Daily Mail, 24th October 2007). Last year, 11.3 million drew a state pension compared with 11.5 million children under 16 years. By 2031 there will be 15 million pensioners even though the pension age will have increased to 66 for men and women after 2024. In comparison, the numbers of children will rise from 11.5 million to 13 million in 2031.

Similar situation is in the US - first the native citizen complain the immigrants "take their jobs" and when they start to leave, they change their minds because they cannot find a nativie citizen to do the same job for the same lousy money..


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