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Requirements for bringing a Dog into Poland


twiggygk 1 | 3
4 Jun 2012 #1
I am travelling by car to Poland from the UK on Wednesday 6th June 2012, the trip will take me 3 days and i am bringin my 3 year old dog (Jack Russell Terrier) with me. She has been issued with a Pet Passport about 6 months ago and has had her rabies vaccination and blood test. I decided to ask a Polish friend to check with a vet if there were any additional requirements to bring my dog across the german/polish border and in addition to the pet passport they also said that the dog needed de-worming not more than 24 hours before crossing the border.

Can anyone confirm if this is correct or if there are any other requirements. Also it would be good to know what to expect on arrival at the border crossing and what i will be expected to do.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
4 Jun 2012 #2
What border crossing are u talking about ?

There is no German/Polish border control (usually)

However, during Euro2012 there may be spot checks.

I have my doubts about the worming thingy. I wouldn't bother with that. But if asked just give the answer required: yes, of course.
OP twiggygk 1 | 3
4 Jun 2012 #3
Thanks for the response. As you can see i have no idea what to expect, even not knowing theres normally no manned border control points. Im coming into Poland on the E30 which i assume is a popular route so maybe there will be due to the increase in visitors. I guess the worst that can happen is i have to find a german vet and get done whatever needs doing if i get turned away.

Thanks!!!
poland_
5 Jun 2012 #4
When you arrive in Poland take your dog to a reputable vet, you will already have a dog history book that has been signed by your vet in the UK, keep this up to date every time a Polish vet gives an injection or shot to your dog it should be entered into their log as well as your book being stamped. The problem may come when you decide to take your dog back to the uk if you don't follow protocol.

What about your Jack has he been chipped if so don't you have to re-register your new address, in case the dog goes missing.
OP twiggygk 1 | 3
5 Jun 2012 #5
Thanks Warszawski! I will take her to a vet on my arrival. Im only going to be in Warsaw for 2 months working so i dont know if its necessary for me to change her registered address on her microchip or not but i will investigate further. Thank you!
poland_
5 Jun 2012 #6
I can provide you with details of a good vet In Warszawa, they also speak English. I also have a dog and have used the services of three or four vets so I have a little experience. Which part of Warsaw will you reside?
OP twiggygk 1 | 3
5 Jun 2012 #7
Hi there, im going to be living in Wilanów, but the recomendation of a good vet anywhere in Warsaw would be great!! Thanks!!
poland_
5 Jun 2012 #8
If you are going to live in Wilanow there is a decent vet on ul Kosiarzy Stary Wilanow.
Sylvio 15 | 115
24 Nov 2016 #9
Merged: Bringing a dog from Canada to Poland

Hi, Could anyone please share any knowledge on what it would take to bring my dog to Poland from Canada?. Me and my wife are in two separate countries now . She has my dog, and can no longer look after her due to job change. The dog is only 3 years old, very healthy, weighing only 7lb. A Dachshund. Fully vaccinated. Not chipped. Could wife take her on a plane and bring here. Is there any quarantine in Poland for a dog moving from Canada to Poland? Appreciate any advice, Sylvio
tellthetruth
24 Nov 2016 #10
Look under Pet/Animals migrant/ Importing_goods_from_outside_the_European_Union_into_Poland.html
mochadot18 14 | 241
13 Sep 2019 #11
Merged:

Bringing dog to Poland



I'm thinking about spending next summer in Poland. I have 2 dogs one being a puppy at 10 months old and the other just turned 3. My 3 year old flies with me all over the U.S. Shes done search and rescue training as a pup and is an emotional support animal. The dog has done 20+ flights now and shes damn amazing just sleeps and chews on her antler. I've done some quick research and it looks like that there inst any quarantine required for dogs. Is this true?? Does she really just have to pass the rabies shot and thats it? Also how dog friendly is Poland?? She comes to work every night with me and to restaurants seating outside of course but I take her almost everywhere with me. Are apartments dog friendly?

Thank you









Dougpol1 33 | 3,247
13 Sep 2019 #12
Cute dog. Yes, well, rabies shot, and de-worming stamp on your dog passport, and that's it.
Businesses are 50 percent dog friendly here - as in - it's left completely to the business owners' discretion whether they allow dogs on their premises or not.

For example, PKO, the state owned bank, has notices on the doors banning dogs, and pistol carrying security enforce that to the letter. Santander, on the other hand (my bank) are delighted when my lab puts his front paws up on the desk (which of course gets an instant correction from me).

Some restaurants refuse you service, and others offer you all sorts of doggie snacks.
So it's all just like the US I guess.........
PS apartment rental is a little more difficult - just got to find a rentier who is a dog lover! Oh. and Poles go all precious about your dog being on seats on public transport. You could be taken off the train and shot! You - not the dog:)
pawian 161 | 9,971
13 Sep 2019 #13
are delighted when my lab puts his front paws up on the desk

That`s sick. How dare you impose your smelly dog on people who might dislike these animals or even have an allergy? You need to be more thoughtful, really. :):)
Miloslaw 6 | 2,560
13 Sep 2019 #14
Oh. and Poles go all precious about your dog being on seats on public transport

Bloody right.Why should dogs take up a seat on public transport?
Did your dog pay for a ticket?

How dare you impose your smelly dog on people

Agreed.Dogs have their place for some, but should never be imposed on others.
People need to have respect for other people, just because you love your dog does not mean others will too.
Dougpol1 33 | 3,247
13 Sep 2019 #15
Did your dog pay for a ticket?

Yep. Full adult fare on Przewowe Regionale short distance. And the staff in Santander love my dog. Granted he does smell a bit after swimming in the Zatoka - but that's because the locals managed to ruin the environment in communist times so the water is dirty.

Not the dogs' fault. He still doesn't smell as much as a lot of Polish men do. And that's a fact.
Miloslaw 6 | 2,560
13 Sep 2019 #16
Yep. Full adult fare on Przewowe Regionale short distance

Fair enough.

. He still doesn't smell as much as a lot of Polish men do

LOL!!! :-)
Dougpol1 33 | 3,247
13 Sep 2019 #17
Fair enough.

Adult fare Gdynia-Gdansk 5.50. Dog fare - 5.50. Some entitlement there. So when he was a pup, I put dog on a blanket on the seat and refused demands to remove him. That kicked up a hell of a storm:):)
Miloslaw 6 | 2,560
13 Sep 2019 #18
That kicked up a hell of a storm:):)

You are a funny guy Doug and I mean that in the nicest possible way :-)
Dougpol1 33 | 3,247
13 Sep 2019 #19
Actually it's taken me 6 years, but I've decided that Tri-city people aren't so bad, so I co-operate generally. They are dog lovers here. Dog is hardly ever on the lead, and the police pass by me without a word because he is at my right heel.

The Straz miasta on the other hand can sit on it. Idiots who didn't make the grade as cops.
johnny reb 18 | 3,771
14 Sep 2019 #20
I put dog on a blanket on the seat and refused demands to remove him

Good for you Doug.
You should have told them that he is an "Emotional Support Dog" and that legally he has every right to go where you go.
You can order those back jackets for dogs on line that say "Support Dog".
Put that on him and no one will screw with you in fear of getting arrested for illegally upsetting an emotionally disabled person.
(Not implying, just saying) lol
And knowing you I would bet that your dog smells better then some of the people on public transit.

because he is at my right heel.

Exactly and knowing you I bet he minds better then most children do.
Most countries however require a dog from a foreign country be quarantined for a period of time before they allow it to enter their country.

They also require a long list of vaccinations such as rabbi's, parvo, distemper, kennel cough, ect.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
14 Sep 2019 #21
Does she really just have to pass the rabies shot and thats it?

Have a look at these links Mocha, she may need a health certificate and obviously needs to be microchipped:

pettravel.com/immigration/poland.cfm

bringfido.com/travel/international/poland/
Dougpol1 33 | 3,247
14 Sep 2019 #22
a health certificate and obviously needs to be microchipped:

Yes - but microchipping is now in law, and the poster will already have her dog chipped. You can't get a rabies cert without it - the two are mutually compatible.
pawian 161 | 9,971
14 Sep 2019 #23
and the police pass by me without a word because he is at my right heel.

That`s wrong coz each dog can go crazy for reasons unknown to human owners and attack another person out of the blue. There are a few dozen cases of seriously bitten, virtually massacred children, sometimes by dogs whose owners claimed after the event: he has always been so good with kids!,.
johnny reb 18 | 3,771
14 Sep 2019 #24
Yeah well I have witnesses an out of control brat having a temper tantrum in public bite and attack another innocent child who was doing nothing to provoke the one that needed a good swat on the ass.

Should that child that went crazy and attacked be required to be muzzled and put on a leash while in public ?
His mother (and I use that word very loosely) claimed after the event: he has always been so good with other kids and this is the first time this has ever happened.

Now go to your safe room honey for a ten minute time out and never do that again.
mafketis 21 | 7,458
14 Sep 2019 #25
Put that on him and no one will screw with you in fear of getting arrested

That's an American thing (unintended consequence of ADA) I don't think it works in Europe
johnny reb 18 | 3,771
14 Sep 2019 #26
"Think" is the key word there.........do you think most Polish citizens would challenge you if you told them that ?
Especially with someone as convincing as Doug.
If the cops give you crap just ask them where in the law book does it say that it is an infraction to let your dog sit on a seat of public transit.

Then when the cop asks you if your dog bites tell him "only when I tell him to."
Lenka 3 | 1,514
14 Sep 2019 #27
The company has regulation saying how you can transport your pets and they can ask you to leave if you don't conform, simple as that.
pawian 161 | 9,971
14 Sep 2019 #28
brat having a temper tantrum in public bite and attack another innocent child

Don`t be silly. Compare injuries by a brat and a big dog.
Miloslaw 6 | 2,560
14 Sep 2019 #29
Yeah Johnny, American kids are like vicious wild animals...... but dogs are harmless... ROTFL!!!
johnny reb 18 | 3,771
15 Sep 2019 #30
Don`t be silly. Compare injuries by a brat and a big dog.

(How about a big brat with a little dog. lol)
O.k. lets..............listen and learn.
When a human bites you, there's a higher risk of infection than with a dog bite.
Class dismissed.


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