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100,000 new jobs for less qualified workers in Poland


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
23 Aug 2013 #1
The Poland government's deregulation law is expected to create some 100,000 news jobs. Competitive exams will be easier, trainee ships shorter and in some cases educational requirements will be lowered.

Will this help decrease joblessness or lower the level of competence in various fields, or maybe a little of both -- remains to be seen.

From now on , inter alia , be better lawyer , notary , bailiff , detective , bodyguard , a taxi driver and trainer. With the deregulation law has created 100 thousand . jobs - the government argues . This flagship Jaroslaw Gowin idea also has opponents who fear increased competition and a decline in professional competence.

The list published on the website of the Ministry of Justice is a 51 professions whose practice will from now require less paperwork overcome . In some cases it will be easier exams , shorter internships and traineeships , sometimes reduces the threshold of education.

delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
23 Aug 2013 #2
Will this help decrease joblessness or lower the level of competence in various fields, or maybe a little of both -- remains to be seen.

It will help things considerably, especially for those that can't afford to pay for expensive courses to get 'papers'. The situation with tour guides was particularly ridiculous, but not only - looking at that list, there were jobs that required certain qualifications for no reason whatsoever. I will forever praise Gowin's work on deregulation - I'm very, very, very sorry that he allowed himself to get caught up in other issues, because he had his eye firmly on the ball when it came to this subject.

As far as I'm concerned, the less entry requirements, the better - just because someone can't afford to put themselves through higher education doesn't mean that they're stupid or incapable.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
24 Aug 2013 #3
Strange as it may seen, I actually agree with your view on deregulation. Although Gowin is also admired for his conservative Catholic, hence genuinely Polish stance on otehr issues and has helped protect Poland from the deviationist threat. My question is: are you that partisan that you must always agree with the PO govt? No criticism ever of the Tusk clique, even of its gaffes and blunders?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
24 Aug 2013 #4
Although Gowin is also admired for his conservative Catholic, hence genuinely Polish stance on otehr issues and has helped protect Poland from the deviationist threat.

Gowin is a strange one by all accounts. I think he's perfect for PO in Krakow - the city is quite conservative/traditional by nature, yet there's a lot of business there - a guy like him should probably do well there. He's made it clear again that he won't join PiS - the best future for him is to become the President of Krakow. I imagine he could work well with PiS on a local level, too.

My question is: are you that partisan that you must always agree with the PO govt?

Absolutely. I criticise them as much as you criticise Kaczynski.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
24 Aug 2013 #5
as you criticise Kaczynski

That's where we differ. I praise and criticise strictly on merit, not according to some preconcieved bias. I have said repeatedly said that Kaczynski should be made honorary presdient for life and someone else should be the actual leader. I think it was a mistake for them to ride the Smolensk horse to death. Since I srongly favour a tough line on stadium hooligans, I think it was a mistake to seek the support of footie thugs and lager louts. Gowin is a good choice not only for Kraków, but for Poland. He can protect the country agaisnt trendy experimentation such as test-tube babies and dangerous deviationism. I'm sure he will also crack down on the dope trade. Also he has a far more statesmanlike demeanour than the squat and frumpy Kaczyński.

You, by contrast, apparently like everything about Tusk -- his shifty eyes, countless unkept promises, nepotism, oldboy clique and scam-monger supporters included.
Bieganski 17 | 896
24 Aug 2013 #6
International manufacturers don't see Poland as having a low skilled workforce but rather a better business-friendly environment:

[telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/industry/10262743/Italian-factory-owner-moves-company-to-Poland-while-staff-are-on-holiday.html]

Italian factory owner moves company to Poland while staff are on holiday:

It was an audacious move that has divided public opinion in Italy and brought into focus the country's low productivity and high labour cost crisis.

Earlier this month, the owner of an electrical components factory in the north of the country waved his employees off on their summer holidays. Then, without informing them, he moved the entire operation, lock, stock and barrel, to Poland.

Fabrizio Pedroni, 49, said he was driven to the drastic course of action because his factory, located near the city of Modena, had not turned a profit for five years and he was being strangled by high salaries, crippling taxes and dismal rates of productivity.

Source: telegraph
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
24 Aug 2013 #7
Signor Pedroni really pulled a fast one. I wonder what Polish workers would have done if someone had pulled that on them?
jon357 69 | 18,513
24 Aug 2013 #8
Complained bitterly probably, though I doubt there's much else they could do.
Bieganski 17 | 896
24 Aug 2013 #9
I wonder what Polish workers would have done if someone had pulled that on them?

LIke in Italy there would be outrage and it would get a lot of press and political attention. But business is business, the EU is a free market place, and millions of Poles have demonstrated for years now to be very adaptable and willing to take advantage of opportunities wherever they are located. Depending on the age of the workers and their relationship with the employer I can imagine some of the younger ones would quite likely move with company if they were told they could still keep their jobs and the business remained within the EU.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
24 Aug 2013 #10
Complained bitterly

The indefatigable, two-fisted Piotr Duda would have come up with a response. I wonder if Signor Pedrino himself has moved to Poland with his family and belongings?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
24 Aug 2013 #11
The indefatigable, two-fisted Piotr Duda would have come up with a response.

Which would have involved a lot of posturing and nothing else.

What, exactly, could the workers do? They would only have themselves to blame.
Bieganski 17 | 896
24 Aug 2013 #12
I wonder if Signor Pedrino himself has moved to Poland with his family and belongings?

I assume so. The article also mentioned:

Mr Pedroni says he has received death threats and will not be returning to Italy anytime soon.

jon357 69 | 18,513
24 Aug 2013 #13
What, exactly, could the workers do?

Zilch, except for making a lot of noise which might merit a few minute's local tv coverage. People wanted capitalism, now they've got it. A shame, but their story is far from unusual.


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