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Poles don't know how to celebrate the Polish Independence Day?


smurf 39 | 1,982
1 Nov 2010  #1
With my bitter disappointment now fading after finally coming to term with Halloween not being celebrated here (unless you go to a crappy niteclub) , i asked my Polish friends how do ye celebrate Polish Independence Day?

They stared at me with blank faces and asked was i mad. Why is the day not a day of celebration and joy, ya know to celebrate every thing about being Polish?

And dont give me any of that crap about Polish history being so sad and all that lark, I'm a paddy so i know what its like to have a miserable history

Wouldnt it be cool if the while country was united in a day of celebration, a bit like St Patricks Day back home or like 4th July in the US etc

Then again maybe its just coz im a paddy and im just wanting an excuse to party
mafketis 19 | 7,009
1 Nov 2010  #2
Yeah, Halloween is mostly a non-starter here. But do make sure to go to a cemetery this evening (arrive between 7 and 8). It's an amazing experience and you won't regret it.

Independence day. Yeah, not so much celebrated as observed here, and by observed I mean 'ignored'.

I'm told that in some places they're starting to have more public kinds of celebrations but the time of year is not conducive to big outdoor public parties. They need to find a national day sometime in summer (early September at the latest).
zetigrek
1 Nov 2010  #3
celebrate Polish Independence Day

It's another free of woek day which we celebarte in front of our tv sets ;)
Varsovians have more fun as they have some military parades.

Yeah, Halloween is mostly a non-starter here.

We have our polish Ostatki. Why we should celebrate some celtic poganic holiday if we have few very nice slavic poganic holidays? ;)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,449
1 Nov 2010  #4
Must every celebration end in a booze-up? Looks as though some people are beyond higher values or deeper feelings.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
1 Nov 2010  #5
Must every celebration end in a booze-up?

hehe that's Polish mentality, when Kaczynski died, Poles here in the States went out and got drunk.
zetigrek
1 Nov 2010  #6
yep, they had a reason to celebrate! ;)
OP smurf 39 | 1,982
1 Nov 2010  #7
I'm told that in some places they're starting to have more public kinds of celebrations

good people should celebrate it

We have our polish Ostatki.

Ok, then let's celebrate that too :-)

Must every celebration end in a booze-up? Looks as though some people are beyond higher values or deeper feelings

How is life up in your ivory tower? Lonely? :-P
Richfilth 6 | 415
1 Nov 2010  #8
Then again maybe its just coz im a paddy and im just wanting an excuse to party

This is the nail whose head you have firmly hit. Poles don't celebrate anything; they've got an Independence Day, a Constitution Day, a Saint's/Military Victory Day AND a few others and the only time you see them outside, en masse, is when someone has died.

This isn't a criticism of Polish culture at all; I far prefer the outdoor sobriety and indoor vodka-guzzling than the notion of "partying" the Irish seem to have exported; vomiting on the street at any given opportunity.

If you came to Poland for fun times, prepare to be sorely disappointed.
OP smurf 39 | 1,982
1 Nov 2010  #9
vomiting on the street at any given opportunity.

better out than in ;-)

seriously though, foget about gettin locked and that, I just cant understand why its not a day to celebrate being all that is Polish, even if it was just a day with some parades for kids in city centres etc.

I'm gonna organise a party in my house for my Polish friends, we're gonna listen to disco-polo and eat loads of traditional food, I'm even trying to convince one of my miner friends to either wear the uniform or let me wear it
mafketis 19 | 7,009
1 Nov 2010  #10
Maybe you should move to Hungary. They make a very big deal of their national holiday with gigantic concerts and open air markets by the Danube and fireworks over it at night. I don't know about private parties but there's lots of public stuff to do.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,449
1 Nov 2010  #11
How little you know our great and noble US Polonia! If they got drunk it was to drown theri bereavement. Kaczyński got 70% of the US Polonian vote. If Komorowski had been killed, they may well have celebrated.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,596
1 Nov 2010  #12
Yet more proof that the US Polonia are nothing more than a bunch of village retards.

Kaczynski's opponents didn't celebrate, so it just shows the (lack of) class of the US Polonia if they would celebrate the death of the President of Poland. After all, Komorowski won a democratic election.

It does show how completely out of touch the US Polonia are when Kaczynski lost almost everywhere else. He even managed to get 0 votes in Oman!
Harry
1 Nov 2010  #13
Yet more proof that the US Polonia are nothing more than a bunch of village retards.

All things considered, it's pretty lucky that those morons aren't in a position to invade ('liberate' as they'd no doubt call it) Slovakia, the Czech Republic or Lithuania. Or any other country anywhere near Poland!
Teffle 22 | 1,321
1 Nov 2010  #14
the notion of "partying" the Irish seem to have exported; vomiting on the street at any given opportunity.

Nice.

You think the Irish invented this notion or have the monopoly on it?
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
1 Nov 2010  #15
Strange, cos on any Friday night I could see a lot of Poles doing the same thing. Odd how drink affects us all.
Bolle 1 | 147
1 Nov 2010  #16
completely out of touch the US Polonia

Only out of touch with polska A.
jonni 16 | 2,485
2 Nov 2010  #18
Kaczynski's opponents didn't celebrate

Some of my neighbours definitely did and with gusto. The day off work was part of it though.
kondzior 8 | 945
2 Nov 2010  #19
You see, American Independence Day is the commemoration of the day when US state was created. On the other hand, 11 November is just the end of Partitons, the independance was gained for 20 years, then we where occupied by Germans, then by Russians. One can argue that since we are part of the EU now, the Poland even today is not fully free.

In sum, Polish independance day in not seen as all that important. By many Poles.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
2 Nov 2010  #20
Kaczyński got 70% of the US Polonian vote.

Yet more proof that the US Polonia are nothing more than a bunch of village retards.

I'd say you are the retard here, or at least a complete failure of the educational system that shaped what you call your brain.

For about 10 million members of US Polonia cast about 35K votes. Of those 70% or 245000 were for Kaczynski. That is 0.00000245% of US Polonia, and for you it reflects what the remaining 99.99999755% think?
OP smurf 39 | 1,982
2 Nov 2010  #21
In sum, Polish independance day in not seen as all that important. By many Poles.

So back to my original point,
wouldn't it be great if the country used it was a day to celebrate being Polish? Instead of just sittin at home watchin 20year old movies on Polsat.
Maybe 12 | 409
2 Nov 2010  #22
Another excuse for a day off work....jesus christ... constantly day off for this day off for that.... it is boring.... just do some work already
kondzior 8 | 945
2 Nov 2010  #23
Instead of just sittin at home watchin 20year old movies on Polsat.

While I agree that we do need more outdoor activities...

wouldn't it be great if the country used it was a day to celebrate being Polish?

I don't get it. To celebrate being Polish? We just are. What's to celebrate?
Teffle 22 | 1,321
2 Nov 2010  #24
I guess he means "...and free/independent" celebrating Polish freedom of expression/individuality etc.

You may not have ended up Polish had Poland not maintained it's identity.
kondzior 8 | 945
2 Nov 2010  #25
I guess so, but the thing is, as I see it, only a Poles livig abroad would thing of celebrating being Polish.
At the some token, while not being feminist, quite the contrary by the way, I'd laugh out loud at the thought of celebrating being a male.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
2 Nov 2010  #26
Well I wouldn't if at various points in history I had not been allowed to be a male : )
kondzior 8 | 945
2 Nov 2010  #27
We are somewhat forbiden to be it right now, and we should fight for it, but celebrating... seems weird ;)
But I see your point, maybe you are more or less right.
Richfilth 6 | 415
2 Nov 2010  #28
You think the Irish invented this notion or have the monopoly on it?

If we're talking of national celebrations, St Patrick's Day does have the monopoly on drunken raucousness, yes.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
2 Nov 2010  #29
If we're talking of national celebrations

No we're not, your post simply mentioned "the notion of partying".

If pressed to nominate, the very concept of the 'lager lout', of vomiting and fighting and of women urinating in streets or performing oral sex on strangers is arguably of English origin.
Richfilth 6 | 415
2 Nov 2010  #30
"the notion of partying".

The notion of partying IN DIRECT REFERENCE to the preceding paragraph about national holidays and celebrations thereof. Of course, be offended, but please work out what your complaint is. The post is really very clear what I was referring to.

I don't deny the terrible reputation Britons have in terms of their Friday night behaviour, but fortunately, what with not having their own national holidays to celebrate (most people here have never heard of Guy Fawkes' Night or Hogmanay), they haven't developed a national holiday around being a p!sshead in quite the way the Irish have.

This post, or the preceding posts, make no reference to how Britons, Poles or the Irish behave on any normal day of the year. Just to make that clear.


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