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Winter in Poland?


rock - | 460
21 Dec 2009 #121
I guess refusing to drink alcohol in order to save yourself from freezing would be even more haram, wouldn't it?

;)

You are totally right :)
Nika 2 | 507
22 Dec 2009 #122
That was a joke. I forgot smiley ;).

I see.
Have you tried herbata z prądem yet?

You are totally right :)

Yeah, that's what I thought, it's somehow logic. Nothing is more precious than life!
mephias 11 | 304
22 Dec 2009 #123
Nika
Not yet but I put some vodka and herbata to my emergency box for coldest days ;).
jwojcie 2 | 763
22 Dec 2009 #124
+4 in Wrocław (from something about -10 two days ago, and something about -20 in Janskie Laznie ski resort :-) )... What would I do with all my new bought liquor ? ;-(
ukpolska
31 Dec 2009 #125
Going skiing tonight here in Puławy for New Years Eve and I expect the temperature to rise with the amount of Brandy consumed at the moment it is - 5 :)

Don't worry going to stop skiing after a couple of hours and then concentrate on the drinking - tipping down with snow here should be a good blast :)

Happy New Year to ya all even delphiandomine lol
matthew12345 1 | 1
16 Feb 2011 #126
Merged: Help me survive the Polish Winter!

Hello every one,

I'd forever be in your debt if any one here can offer their advice.

Okay, so I plan on moving to Poland in the very near future. I'd would have all ready made the move as I have made the necessary arrangements; however, the winter is the only thing holding me back as I am incredibly unprepared for the weather ( I live in LA California, 20 degrees Celsius with a couple of grey clouds is down right cold for us :( )

My first question, when does it stop snowing in Poland? My dad doesn't quite remember but he does recall big chunks of ice in the river around May and it still being cold (he is from Rzeszow), if it matters I'll likely live with my cousin in Krakow.

Secondly, my relatives told me I need warm clothes etc... as if that is not painfully obvious. But they really gave me no specifics. Please tell me the practicality of what I have or what I'm planning to buy and please remember I am going to do my best to skip the worst of the 2011 winter but I will have to survive the 2012 winter and all that rain Poland gets! (the hot summer should be no problem!)

Shoes: I got sandels/flip flops for warm weather, Puma and Adidas sneakers for general use (and maybe for the rain? I only ask this because I usually just wear flipflops when it rains in LA), and for the snow I'm thinking about buying some water proof hiking boots from the Northernface or something along those lines.

Gloves: I really have no clue, maybe leather with fur in them or something? Wool perhaps?

Pants: I have Levis jeans, thats it. Would that work for the snow? Maybe layer with some thermal underwear?

Jackets: Would a snow boarding jacket work? How many jackets/sweaters and what types would be ideal?

Hats: No clue here,but I'm assuming an American baseball cap won't cut it and the furrier and fuzzier the better.

If you guys and girls living in Poland could offer your suggestions you would be helping me out tremendously, as I am really a fish out of water here.

Thank you all,

Matthew
Wroclaw Boy
16 Feb 2011 #127
i usually start wearing thermal under clothes around November and think about not using them around March, in the UK i never bothered although in can get quite cold there too. Here i couldnt imagine walking out side in anything colder than +4 with just one layer of cloth on my legs, how the women manage stockings and such is beyond me but i guess they have more fat to shield them.

when does it stop snowing in Poland?

Depends, although snow is common here in the winter its unusual for it to be on the ground for any length of time as the temps regularly come up to + for a few days and melt it. It can snow in April but unlikely, sub zero temps in April are fairly rare.

(he is from Rzeszow), if it matters I'll likely live with my cousin in Krakow.

i spend a bit of time up near Rseszow in the winter and it is significantly colder than Wroclaw.

all that rain Poland gets!

Youre most likely to see rain in the summer months, August sees the most. It certainly doesn't rain as much here as the UK but compared to California quite a bit i suppose.

I'm thinking about buying some water proof hiking boots from the Northernface or something along those lines.

Perfect, i spent quite a bit on my shoes years ago and they are still going strong, proper strong hiking boots, with good grip for walking on snow and ice.

Gloves: I really have no clue, maybe leather with fur in them or something? Wool perhaps?

Ski or snowboard gloves are perfect even better would be leather motor cycle gloves depending on how much time you spend exposed, having said that i usually just wear the inners for my snowboard gloves.

Jackets: Would a snow boarding jacket work? How many jackets/sweaters and what types would be ideal?

Its all about the layers, any jacket will be fine providing you have enough layers underneath.

Hats: No clue here,but I'm assuming an American baseball cap won't cut it and the furrier and fuzzier the better.

Just get a standard snowboarding cap, you dont have to look like a Russian with a big fury hat and ear flaps.

You forgot socks, very important.
Olaf 6 | 956
16 Feb 2011 #128
Dude, this is not Syberia. It can get cold, but in the cities mentioned (not some outskirts) it can usually be down to -20 C degree. Right now in Krakow it's around -6 I think. Just get some warm socks, some woolen sweaters and a flanel shirt maybe and jeans and you'll be all right.
Stu 12 | 522
16 Feb 2011 #129
Right now in Krakow it's around -6 I think.

It's +1 ;) ... but the wind chill (4Bft from the SE) makes it feel like -5,8.
Olaf 6 | 956
16 Feb 2011 #130
-5,8.

:D very accurate - my feeling was -6. I didn't eat proper breakfast so I was feeling more cold. That was my rouh guess then.

+1 - that's what the politicians are trying to tell you... :D
Harry
16 Feb 2011 #131
i usually start wearing thermal under clothes around November and think about not using them around March, in the UK i never bothered although in can get quite cold there too. Here i couldnt imagine walking out side in anything colder than +4 with just one layer of cloth on my legs,

First couple of years I was in Poland I used to wear all that thermal stuff but these days I just don't bother: the extra comfort when outside just isn't worth the extra discomfort when inside.

I'm thinking about buying some water proof hiking boots from the Northernface or something along those lines.

Timberland boots are very very hard to beat: I've got pairs which are ten+ years old and the only damage to them was caused by me making no effort at all to take care of them.

he does recall big chunks of ice in the river around May and it still being cold (he is from Rzeszow)

Chunks of ice in the river in May is unusual but does happen (although I can only remember it once or twice in 15 years).

If you guys and girls living in Poland could offer your suggestions you would be helping me out tremendously, as I am really a fish out of water here.

My top tip would be LL Bean. Their clothes are excellent quality (and pretty well priced) and backed a perfect guarantee: everything is guaranteed for ever.
scottie1113 7 | 898
16 Feb 2011 #132
I agree with evrything said above. I wear a baseball cap most of the year to keep the sun out of my eyes and the rain off my head. When it's a little wamer but raining, I wear a light North Face waterproof jacket. In winter I wear a stocking cap. It's fine.

I'm from San Diego and with the right clothes, I've had no problems with winter weather.

BTW, to my California mind, it doesn't get hot in Poland, just comfortably warm, though my friends would disagree with on on that. :)
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
16 Feb 2011 #133
Spot on advice from all the above. Id just add that the weather can catch you out. I visited the Krakow/Zakopane area in early march one year,had packed for the "russian front" all chunky knits and watch caps,spent all week in shirt sleaves,even up in the mountains with snow on the ground :0

Also,maybe this is just Warsaw,but i found ,late september,early October the weather can change in stupidly fast ways,from bone chilling to back warming in the time it takes to nip in and out of a grocery shop.
peterweg 37 | 2,320
16 Feb 2011 #134
A wool cap and a half decent coat is all I bother with. -5C isn't much to worry about.

Thermals? I'd wait until its -15C or colder before considering them. When I go skiing I wear thermal long johns and a thermal top with a wind proof jacket, no further clothes and its good for 15minute lift journeys with alpine winds and -15c temps up the mountain.

Krakow doesn't get much wind, I was shocked when I can back to London as the wind made it feel far worse.
jonni 16 | 2,485
16 Feb 2011 #135
Same here. A good coat (but not as heavy as ski stuff). Hat and gloves only for the coldest few weeks.
Olaf 6 | 956
16 Feb 2011 #136
Thermals? I'd wait until its -15C or colder before considering them.

A good coat (but not as heavy as ski stuff). Hat and gloves only for the coldest few weeks.

Still, people who come from warmer regions must remember to protect their "royal Rastafarian nay-nays" from freezing (Cool runnings movie).
Anyone knows what's it for?





Wroclaw Boy
16 Feb 2011 #137
Timberland boots are very very hard to beat: I've got pairs which are ten+ years old and the only damage to them was caused by me making no effort at all to take care of them.

Timberlands are great the best pair i ever had were stolen from a locker room in the UK and they were about three years old.

In Poland i wear a pair similar to these by Salamon, just brilliant for everything and waterproof.


  • Romper stompers
Wroclaw 44 | 5,385
16 Feb 2011 #138
Gloves

buy a coat with pockets

Pants:

cold air gets trapped under jeans. wear either: leggings, pyjama bottoms or your girl friend's pantyhose/tights.

Jackets:

depends on the quality of your sweater. i just wear two shirts and a regular jacket

Hats:

i never bother with one. but the norm is a wooly cap (black)

you'll need a scarf, but put your jacket on first and then wrap the scarf around a couple of times and knot it. most women do this.

remember that when it's cold u'll be indoors and when u go out... use public transport.

if you are afraid of the cold don't buy a dog... especially not an owczarek podhalanski.
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
16 Feb 2011 #139
Gloves: I really have no clue, maybe leather with fur in them or something? Wool perhaps?

I don't think they are necessary unless you have to clean the windscreen each morning. Today (at 7oo in Olsztyn) was -14'C. At the moment is -6'C.

Pants: I have Levis jeans, thats it. Would that work for the snow? Maybe layer with some thermal underwear?

Some underwear is strongly recommended :)
anstel.pl/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1047
mafketis 25 | 9,324
16 Feb 2011 #140
I'm from a warm climate and have hardly ever bothered with long underwear. I've used it a few times in unusually cold weather but usually just jeans are fine. You do want to have at least three layers above the waist. For me teeshirt, shirt and coat are usually enough though in really cold weather I might also have a sweater under the coat.

If you don't have long hair then make sure you have a cap that covers your ears.

Polish people are paranoid about their necks getting cold so if you don't wear a muffler people you know will worry and nag you into wearing something.

It mostly doesn't snow that much in Poland anymore (though it did last winter and in December of this winter). It can snow well into April but won't last long.

One big problem : slippery when frozen! You'll need shoes for when the sidewalks and streets are icy. If you're not used to it then it can be a big adjustment.

Another problem : Weather changes quickly and often in Poland and you can easily experience three seasons on any day of the year. If you arrive in March be aware that natives often have troulbe knowing what to wear if you dress warm enough in the morning you'll be sweaty and uncomfortable in the afternoon. Carry around a bookbag that you can store excess clothes in.
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
16 Feb 2011 #141
Timberlands are great the best pair i ever had were stolen from a locker room in the UK and they were about three years old.

LMAO....a pikey stole my 4 year old Timberlands,god they were comfy,like slippers by then :(
scottie1113 7 | 898
16 Feb 2011 #142
One big problem : slippery when frozen! You'll need shoes for when the sidewalks and streets are icy

Yeah. Just before Sylwester I slipped on a snow covered patch of ice and broke a rib. I was wearing boots, but they didn't have spikes on the bottom. :) Now I just walk very carefully when it's icy.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
16 Feb 2011 #143
One big problem : slippery when frozen! You'll need shoes for when the sidewalks and streets are icy. If you're not used to it then it can be a big adjustment.

I got the shock of my life when there was that freezing rain a couple of months ago - was walking down Sw. Marcin and took about 15 minutes to go from the crossing of Ratajczaka to the tram stop on Marcinkowskiego. I've never, ever seen anything like that before...
JaneDoe 5 | 114
16 Feb 2011 #144
You'll need shoes for when the sidewalks and streets are icy. If you're not used to it then it can be a big adjustment.

Believe it or not, but Poles do wear shoes! Every day! Cold or warm! Yes, I know, it's surprising.
If you're not used to wearing shoes, well, I wish you good luck and all the best. You just have to adjust.
;)
mafketis 25 | 9,324
16 Feb 2011 #145
I got the shock of my life when there was that freezing rain a couple of months ago ... I've never, ever seen anything like that before...

That wasn't even that bad. My first winter here, mumblemumble years ago, it once rained then froze and the whole downtown area was covered by a sheet of smooth ice. Not knowing any better I went out and about in my regular shoes. I was even doing okay for a while and was even thinking 'this isn't so ba-" when I took a massive pratfall followed by a several more before I got back home. It's been dicey a few times since but never anything quite like that...
beckski 12 | 1,617
17 Feb 2011 #146
I live in LA California, 20 degrees Celsius with a couple of grey clouds is down right cold for us

It rained in LA today. Forecast indicates we should have the wet stuff til Saturday. Boo hoo:(
Nojas 4 | 110
17 Feb 2011 #147
There are three main areas which is important to keep warm to be comfortable at low temperatures:
Feet
Hands
Head

So get a pair of boots, gloves (preferbly leather), hat and a decent winterjacket/coat and you will be fine. When it comes to jeans, don't wear your typical cool summer jeans, they are a little too thin. Regular jeans will be fine.

Personally I only wear normal white socks, jeans, t-shirt, sweater, jacket, sneakers and gloves even down to -20 degrees. But then again, I've been living in this type of climate for 26 years... ;)

It might come as a chock when your nostrils and the liquid in the eyes starts to freeze (if it is cold enough), but you will quickly get used to it. Eventually low tempratures won't bother you so much.
sleeptight
4 Dec 2011 #148
Merged: Winter Worries, Other tips?

Hi All

I'm from America and Im moving to Poland. Im worried about ...the winter. Ive read stories of peoples pipes bursting with ice, heaters dying in the night, electricity being lost for days. I know the winter can be harsh, but Poland is a modern country, so how can I prepare to avoid these complications? Especially with choosing housing. I'll be living in Krakow. I'm from the southern part of America, from Florida, so we have a cool breeze once in awhile, ha!

Appreciated.
tygrys 3 | 295
4 Dec 2011 #149
That stuff happens here in America, not only in Poland.
Wedle 16 | 496
4 Dec 2011 #150
I'm from America and Im moving to Poland. Im worried about ...the winter.

Turn up at the end of March you won't have to worry about the weather.


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