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Starting a daycare in Poland, possible?


bschwartz 1 | 1
15 Mar 2011 #1
I want to start a daycare in Poland that also helps the kids learn languages...I haven't been able to find any daycare's because it looks like everyone here just uses a kindergarten. Is this true? What about the kids who are younger than kindergarten age? I would just like to know if it is possible?
delphiandomine 83 | 17,726
15 Mar 2011 #2
It is possible.

But the law in Poland is so strict concerning such facilities that you won't get anywhere without a good local partner - it's not something that you can do easily.
OP bschwartz 1 | 1
15 Mar 2011 #3
when you mean local partner, do you mean a local school or maybe even a language school?
delphiandomine 83 | 17,726
15 Mar 2011 #4
Preferably (at least) an assistant director of a similar sort of facility. They do exist, although there's not many of them around.

You definitely cannot do this alone - and I'd be inclined to say that you can't do it without a decent amount of money behind you.

It's certainly much easier to open a kindergarten (age 4+) than any sort of facility for younger children.
Olaf 6 | 956
22 Mar 2011 #5
daycare

kindergarten

First explain what you mean by those. Depending where you are from it means either the same or not.

What about the kids who are younger than kindergarten age?

There is a sort of a creche or nursery as others call it, it's called żłobek in Poland.
Children can be admitted to kindergarten when they are at least 2.5 y/o, younger ones can go to złobek
smartki
3 Jan 2012 #6
Good luck,

Fun to run a daycare center,, a lot of kids,, a lot of fund,, don't forget to add you daycare center on this directory care.smartchildguide.com so people can find you
Olaf 6 | 956
3 Jan 2012 #7
This website us useless outside the US.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
3 Jan 2012 #8
The paperwork needed to operate a facility for young kids in PL is enough to put off all but the most determined. Why not contact the Helen Doran Method organisation about opening a franchise?
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
3 Jan 2012 #9
What about the kids who are younger than kindergarten age?

Kindergarten age starts at 3. Do you seriously want to teach languages to children under 3? Younger children are cared for in a żłobek (creche), but parents only choose this option if they really have no other solution.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,726
3 Jan 2012 #10
Do you seriously want to teach languages to children under 3?

This insanity is spreading in Poland - I had one psychopath phone me for a native speaker for his 18 month old!
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
3 Jan 2012 #11
Yeah, I know. It's the "The sooner the better" mantra. Unfortunately, it only works in a total-immersion-type natural setting. From my experience, the best age for kids to start learning a foreign language in a formal or semi-formal setting is approx. 8-9 years old. They learn much faster and are way more motivated.
Olaf 6 | 956
4 Jan 2012 #12
I had one psychopath phone me for a native speaker for his 18 month old!

Hah! Did you explain them it's no use? If so, and they still wanted, let them spend their money...
pip 10 | 1,661
4 Jan 2012 #13
Yeah, I know. It's the "The sooner the better" mantra. Unfortunately, it only works in a total-immersion-type natural setting. From my experience, the best age for kids to start learning a foreign language in a formal or semi-formal setting is approx. 8-9 years old. They learn much faster and are way more motivated.

unfortunately there is no way to prove this. the school my kids go to is half polish half english- 75% of the students are Polish and only speak Polish at home but learn English and often French with no problems.

Children are able to assimilate up to 6 languages by the age of 6. This doesn't mean there will not be problems along the way- but ultimately who gives a rats' if a child is slower at spelling or reading when the ultimate outcome is speaking more than one language.

For example, my 7 year old has been having a hard time with her reading. We read each night for 20 minutes and her reading has improved. I don't care if her reading is poor at 7 when she speaks two languages and is learning how to read and write- ultimately by the time she reaches middle school is she is still having problems then I would be worried. If a child speaks more than one language there is bound to be problems compared to a child that is unilingual.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
4 Jan 2012 #14
There is some evidence from Korea that English language kindergartens can be harmful to a child's development.
gosc
13 Feb 2012 #15
To start a creche in Poland you have to have a certain education degree. You, as a owner has to have a master degree in teaching or in education. The similar situation is with employees. The minimum is bachelor degree, but you can start working having that and continue studying part time. There are also very strict regulations about the space per child and the equipment. Especially if you want to prepare meals for the children in creche. Not to mention about specific teaching program. The best way for you would be to open a kind of play place where you are more responsible for taking care for the children while parents are absent. There are many places like that in bigger towns and cities. Parents can bring their children and leave them there even for a few hours.

Teaching language would be a very good idea as well. It would constitute a major attraction as well. You could also set up language classes, (separately), for different age stages. It is scientifically proved that children up to 3, exposed to foreign language can speak as many language as possible. Even if they don't speak at all they learn the melody of foreign language and their speech organ is prepared to create certain muscles which are responsible for pronunciation. There are language courses in Poland even for infants. Great idea. I am sure that some Polish institution will be able to help you to start a new business. I am not sure, but I think that there are some tax reliefs as well. You can get some funds from EU grants for education as well. I wish you all the best. Let it be enjoyable and profitable experience for you.


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