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Poland residency dilemma - illegal worker affecting my income


BLS 65 | 188
21 Oct 2010 #1
I am a legal resident of Poland, own my own business, and teach at a language school in Krakow. As an American citizen, so I must re-apply for Polish residency one year at a time - one of the requirements is that I earn enough money to live, eat, pay ZUS, etc. Last year, the residency official almost denied my application because she was concerned about the number of hours I taught each week - she thought it was a bit too low but begrudgingly allowed me to stay.

Anyway, my language school has cutback everyone's hours this year, so I am concerned that this might adversely affect my residency status when it comes time to re-apply. I now have a dilemma - one of my colleagues at this school (also American) is living here and working illegally, and I feel his hours should be redistributed among the rest of us who are legal and in need of work. I hold no ill will towards this person and don't wish to deny him the opportunity to make a living, but it doesn't seem fair that I could face deportation due to an insufficient workload while he continues to stay and teach without doing the legwork necessary to be here legally.

I really don't know what to do next - has anyone else faced this issue before? I will try to find some hours elsewhere, but most schools want to pay me under the table and I need legal, above-board hours. Perhaps everything will work out positively, but I do not want to risk being sent away because I under-reacted.

Any constructive input will be highly appreciated - thanks!
convex 20 | 3,978
21 Oct 2010 #2
I hold no ill will towards this person and don't wish to deny him the opportunity to make a living, but it doesn't seem fair that I could face deportation

Man up and call them out.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
21 Oct 2010 #3
but it doesn't seem fair that I could face deportation due to an insufficient workload while he continues to stay and teach without doing the legwork necessary to be here legally.

Sorry to ask, but if that is the case, why did you hire this teacher in the first place? It's seems to me that, although he may not be in the country legally, as an employer you should be helping him with the legwork to be in the country legally....and therefore you wouldn't have the problem you have now. Hmmmm American employer of illegal teachers in Krakow, sounds interesting...
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
21 Oct 2010 #4
why did you hire this teacher in the first place?

He doesnt own the school D T, he simply works for them
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
21 Oct 2010 #5
Therefore I wouldn't call him out, as the employer will be happier paying him than paying a legally teaching American :/
OP BLS 65 | 188
21 Oct 2010 #6
I have no intention of calling him out - I merely think that the school should do more to satiate its legal workers when times are lean. And I don't think the school is paying him less than me (but I don't know this for a fact).

I broached the subject with my DoS today and he didn't seem to understand my point. His argument was that this guy has bills to pay as well. I replied that he doesn't have to pay ZUS like I do and that sort of shut him up, but it didn't seem to change his opinion.

To be honest, this feels like a lose/lose situation for yours truly...
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
21 Oct 2010 #7
I think I already know the answer to this question, but what school is it?
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
21 Oct 2010 #8
one of my colleagues at this school (also American) is living here and working illegally, and I feel his hours should be redistributed among the rest of us who are legal and in need of work.

LOL. An American illegally working in Poland? Sarcasm off.
Dude - live and let live.
I’m sure you figure something out no need to rat someone out or be envious.
alexw68
21 Oct 2010 #9
I am a legal resident of Poland, own my own business, and teach at a language school in Krakow.

Well - diversify then, if you feel your teaching income is under threat. As a business owner you have that opportunity. Just don't expect Marquis of Queensberry rules from your employer. As I discovered many years ago before I jumped ship - there's not enough margin in language teaching for people to play fair.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
22 Oct 2010 #10
I will try to find some hours elsewhere, but most schools want to pay me under the table and I need legal, above-board hours.

Why not simply give a few private lessons and give them receipts? You could even give them 2x20zl receipts rather than 1x40zl to bump the hours up a bit, as well as getting the school to pay you (on paper) for twice the amount of hours worked for half the money.

Having said this, I'd tell the immigration people without hesitation. I've got absolutely no time for illegal immigrants - white, black or yellow, they're still illegal.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
22 Oct 2010 #11
This is the point, its Krakow and I know the teaching scene there inside out. There are plenty of teachers to choose from so what's the need to employ illegals?....hmmmm....no need to pay zus or tax if cash in hand or simple bank transfer?
mafketis 29 | 9,973
22 Oct 2010 #12
Are Polish employers fined for hiring illegals?
Harry
22 Oct 2010 #14
Where is the dilemma? A criminal is making your life worse and more difficult: take care of the problem.
OP BLS 65 | 188
22 Oct 2010 #15
It's not quite that easy, Harry - if I say or do anything, I risk losing my job at the school. Also, the illegal lad is popular with the other teachers - if word gets out that I blew the whistle, I could be ostracized. It's a very touchy situation.

I have always held a bit of a grudge that this cat stays here snug as a bug while I bust my hump to stay here legally, but it never adversely affected me before now. I thought the issue would be solved last year when he returned to the states for a couple of weeks - but for some reason, he was allowed entrance back into Poland! I don't get it...
Harry
22 Oct 2010 #16
if I say or do anything, I risk losing my job at the school.

So never ever tell anybody that you blew the whistle. Problem solved.
mafketis 29 | 9,973
22 Oct 2010 #17
How do you know he's illegal?
OP BLS 65 | 188
22 Oct 2010 #18
He told me...
mafketis 29 | 9,973
22 Oct 2010 #19
How do you know he was telling the truth?

I'm pretty sure the school has some idea of his status and doesn't want to risk fines etc by payng under the table or into his hand (as they say in Poland).


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