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Ukrainian language similar to Polish?



Lyzko    
19 Mar 2012  #181

...or more precisely "Yevtushenkuh", as the Russians say it, opening the 'closed' vowel as they typically do in "Kalinko" (Kalyeenkuh), "Gromyko" (Gruhmeekuh) etc...:-)


Woon    
9 Oct 2012  #182

porteuropa.eu/ucz-si-ukraiskiego

Very good FREE course of Ukrainian for POLISH-speaking. Written in Polish. Subscribe - it is worth it!
Some RARE mistakes, but 95% brilliant, correct and easy-getting for any Pole.
Woon    
12 Feb 2013  #183

łThere are several notable differences that Poles eagering to learn Ukrainian must not forget about.

Such as:

* There are sounds in Ukrainian that do not exist in Polish at all, although they are normal logical Slavic sounds, in general.
Poles used to take the softened c (=ts,tz) as ć=ci, softened z as ź, softened s as ś=si. In Ukrainian there are just c’, z’, s’ alongside ć, ź and ś. These are absolutely separate sounds there. To learn Ukrainian pronunciation one has to learn how to pronunciate the softened c, z and s properly.

* In fact, cz(=tsz) is always hard in Ukrainian - i.e., always quite cz, not ć(=ci). Put before i it obtains some softeness, but not the complete one. So, formally, there is no Polish sound ć=ci in Ukrainian.

* Neither of the Polish sounds l or ł has any 100% Ukrainian equivalent. Ukrainian l is somewhat in between Polish l and ł, Ukrainian softened sound of l is probably a bit more softer than Polish l.

* There are different affixes in Ukrainian, which is obvious. For Ukrainians "Polska" is not a noun, it is rather an adjective that means "Polish (fem. sing.)". Well, it must be pronunciated pOl’s’ka in Ukrainian, to be correct.

Ukrainians take "poeta" or "rowerysta" as the words of the feminine gender because of the ending a. These words sound strange for them, because the terms for the occupations are used to be presented in the masculine gender, usually, of course.

* In Ukrainian Polish nasal ą and ę are certainly absent. The good news is that there’s the vocative case, too. No articles, as well.

* In Ukrainian the tongue twisters of the extra dense consonant clusters are hard (though not impossible) to find... Most of the Ukrainian words tend to dissolve the Russian and Polish consonant clusters with the vowels.

And please, never use the words "matka" (that means "womb" in Russian and Ukrainian) and especially "ssaki" (moderately brutal Russian word for rejected urine and possibly feces) there... Also remember that the word "wieloryb" may evoke much fun in the Russian-speaking spheres. Rower (bicycle) is wielosipiEd in Russian, welosypEd in Ukrainian - most probably, people will take this word as a pun upon "a fish on a bicycle". Or "a fish with a bicycle". Or a fish-bicycle.

Not to mention samochOd which is associated with the heavy military machines.
Vlad123 7 | 206    
13 Feb 2013  #184

Not to mention samochOd which is associated with the heavy military machines.

Or some odd and self-made transportaton device...

Yes, for all I know, -enko is the most typical Ukrainian ending of the surnames. Others may include...
Ivanyshyn

I didn`t know that Ivanyshyn is natively Ukrainian family name.
There is Slovenian actress by name Nina Ivanishin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nina_Ivani%C5%A1in
coucou    
28 Feb 2013  #185

Here are the Russian and Ukrainian versions of the same song. Which one do you understand better? :)

Russian: youtube.com/watch?v=LdpDpUk7Jss

Ukrainian: youtube.com/watch?v=tep8SqxG1U8

just add w w w before youtube. I'm not allowed to post these characters as a newbie,
jwojcie 2 | 763    
1 Mar 2013  #186

^^
well, I'must say Russian, but probably because I learnt it... Either way, frankly I don't care... girls are lovely in both versions ;)
Sveta    
24 Jul 2013  #187

I am east Ukrainian and I speak Russian, and Ukrainian, but when I hear polish speakers, it is similar to Ukrainian and sometimes understandable depending on the context
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,920    
24 Jul 2013  #188

I am east Ukrainian

Colloquially one sometimes hears that Ukrainian is half Russian, half Polish. Seriously though, is there any difference between the Ukrainian spoken in the east and the west? Is the Lvïv version more influenced by Polish and the Kyïv region one closer to Russian.? Are there any vocabulary differences? Can you give a few examples. In Kraków, for insatnce, people say na polu and elsewhere na dworze to mean outdoors. They also don't pronounce the trz sound and say: ile jest czy razy czy?

Dużo diakuju!
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
24 Jul 2013  #189

Colloquially one sometimes hears that Ukrainian is half Russian, half Polish.

Not true. In fact Polish is 60% Russian and 80% Russian if we compare basic and older vocabulary.
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,920    
24 Jul 2013  #190

In fact Polish is 60% Russian and 80% Russian

Wasn't one of those percentages supposed to be Ukrainian?
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
24 Jul 2013  #191

Ukrainian will add you approx. 15% more in understanding Polish in comparison to Russian.
In fact quite many Polish words sound even more similar to Russian than to Ukrainian even if
they have common roots on all three languages. So knowing both Russian and Ukrainian you
will be able to understand 70-75% of Polish. But basic and older vocabulary is much easier to
understand. Still there is many differences. Such as 1) different stresses. 2)Polish has set of sounds
which are absent in other Slavic languages. 3) Majority of sounds are pronounced slightly different.
4) Polish got an articles while Russian and Ukrainian do not. 5) Suffixes and endings in cases are often
different though sometimes they are similar. 6) Sentence construction could differ sometimes.
In general Ukrainian would not be able to understand most of Polish without preparation.
Woon    
24 Jul 2013  #192

There is a well known mem that Ukrainian to taka mieszanka rosyjskiego i polskiego z ewentualnymi nutkami czeskiego (is the mixture of Russian and Polish with eventual traits of Czech).
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,920    
24 Jul 2013  #193

Polish got an articles

What do you mean by that? Polish has no articles such as German der, die and das, French le and la or Bulgarian ta at the end of a word.
Wulkan - | 3,200    
24 Jul 2013  #194

Not true. In fact Polish is 60% Russian and 80% Russian if we compare basic and older vocabulary

source please
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,920    
24 Jul 2013  #195

if we compare basic and older vocabulary

Could you provide soem examples of differences in vocabulary between eastern and western Ukrainian speech and maybe also Carpatho-Rusyn which contains Slovak influence.
Lexo    
25 Jul 2013  #196

Similarities with Polish: Czech (87%), Slovak (85%), Lower Sorbian (83%), Belarusian (80%), Russian (77%), Ukrainian (76%).

Similarities with Ukrainian: Belarusian (92%), Russian (86%), Polish (76%), Rusyn dialects (76%), Bulgarian (72%)

The Slavic languages based on the lexicostatistical research by Girdenis and Maziulis (1994)

indo-european-migrations.scienceontheweb.net/slavic_continuum.gif

Correction: Rusyn dialects are similar in 76% to Slovak language, not Ukrainian.
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
25 Jul 2013  #197

quote]Vlad1234: Not true. In fact Polish is 60% Russian and 80% Russian if we compare basic and older vocabulary[/quote]

source please

how-to-learn-any-language.com/e/languages/similarities/russian/index.html

Though, honestly I believe they exaggerate similarity of Russian to some languages listed except Polish. Bulgarian and Serbian are hardly closer to Russian than Polish. Ukrainian no more than 80 %.
Wulkan - | 3,200    
25 Jul 2013  #198

how-to-learn-any-language.com/e/languages/similariti es/rus sian/index.html

I still can't see anything that backs this up "Polish is 80% Russian if we compare basic and older vocabulary"

Though, honestly I believe they exaggerate similarity of Russian to some languages listed except Polish. Bulgarian and Serbian are hardly closer to Russian than Polish. Ukrainian no more than 80 %.

well ofcourse! none of those coutries boarder with mighty Germany so why would you want them to be similar to Russian :-)))
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
25 Jul 2013  #199

I still can't see anything that backs this up "Polish is 80% Russian if we compare basic and older vocabulary"

Even without knowledge of these two languages it is something quite easy to conclude because if Polish similar
to Russian 60% on average and they descended from common origin it is quite logically to conclude that older words
should be more similar on average than those invented later or borrowed from some third languages. Older vocabulary
for example includes personal pronounces, names of animals and plants, body parts, most common verbs, simple
tools names, etc.
Monitor 14 | 1,832    
25 Jul 2013  #200

I've noticed those ukrainians living near the polish border speak a more polish-influenced dialect than those living in Kyiv, for example.

Maybe because what they speak in Kiev is Russian.
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
25 Jul 2013  #201

Vast majority, yes. Some speak Ukrainian in Kiev. In Kiev there is lots of migrants from
the rest of Ukraine including people from Western parts of Ukraine.

What do you mean by that? Polish has no articles such as German der, die and das, French le and la or Bulgarian ta at the end of a word.

Probably I've mistook classical articles with some other elements present in Polish but not in Russian or Ukrainian. Need time to found out again what is it.
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,920    
25 Jul 2013  #202

Russian and Ukrianian lack nasal vowels such as ą and (rarely heard but always written) ę.
BTW have you got hands-on epxeirnece with the Ukrainian street scene? How does a Russian-speaking Kyivian react to the sound of the Ukrainian tongue -- indifferently, with interest or does it strike him as a peasant dialect. Some Wielkorusy look down on Ukrainian and and Belarusian regarding them as dialects of Russian used by mużiki.
Wulkan - | 3,200    
25 Jul 2013  #203

Polish similar
to Russian 60% on average and they descended from common origin

Do you mean that Polish and Russian descended from common origin because they are both slavic languages?

So if Croatian is 65% similar to Russian then if we compare basic and older vocabulary they are about 85% similar, is that right?
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
26 Jul 2013  #204

Do you mean that Polish and Russian descended from common origin because they are both slavic languages?

I do not want to prove it, but which else opinions exist on this matter? If yes, are they elaborated?

So if Croatian is 65% similar to Russian

It could be a wrong assumption.
Wulkan - | 3,200    
26 Jul 2013  #205

So if Croatian is 65% similar to Russian

It could be a wrong assumption.

I was more interested you answering the second part of the question:

So if Croatian is 65% similar to Russian then if we compare basic and older vocabulary they are about 85% similar, is that right?
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
26 Jul 2013  #206

So if Croatian is 65% similar to Russian then if we compare basic and older vocabulary they are about 85% similar, is that right?

How older vocabulary could be 85% similar if entire vocabulary is NOT 65% similar? I do not know Croatian deeply, but from what
I encountered I doubt it is more similar to Russian than Polish. Probably even less. Though people say that Croatian is slightly closer to
Russian than Serbian.

well ofcourse! none of those coutries boarder with mighty Germany so why would you want them to be similar to Russian :-)))

Mighty Germany? Laughable. This is pathetic disappearing ethnicity, not even their woman want to have any children.
My mind about different languages similarity is based on pure objectivity rather than emotions. For example the richest per capita Slavic country
is Slovenia but I do NOT claim that their language is closer to Russian than Polish or even Serbian or Bulgarian.
Though there some interesting similarities. For example:
English - Slovenian - Russian

Mister - Gospod - Gospodin
Mrs. Gospa - Gospo
Star - Zvezda - Zvezda
Glass - Steklo - Steklo
Skin - Koža - Koža
Speak - Govorimo - Govorit`
Propose - Predlagati - Predlagat`
Search - Iskanje - Iskat`
Street - Ulitca – Ulitca
Work - Delo - Delo
Flower - Cvet - Cvetok
Sense - Smisl - Smysl
Bird - Ptica - Ptica
Debt - Dolg - Dolg
How - Kako - Kak
Pike - šèuka - šèuka
Trader - Trgovec - Torgovec
Wulkan - | 3,200    
26 Jul 2013  #207

Mighty Germany? Laughable. This is pathetic disappearing ethnicity, not even their woman want to have any children.

Russians have German roots even more...

I just wanted to show that Russia is not so alien to Western Europeans

My mind about different languages similarity is based on pure objectivity rather than emotions.

Are you sure? :-)))
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
26 Jul 2013  #208

Principally ethnic Germans are not pathetic beside their fertility qualities. I think they did certain achievements in many fields and
their cities are or at least were example of how people should to care about cleanness and order. I like German architecture and
city planning. Their classical music and opera are also very famous. Germans are known for their work ethics. But what relation
does Germany has to comparison between Slavic languages. Czech rep. also borders Germany but I do not claim Czech language
more similar to Russian than Polish or Serbian. Principally, many opinions about nations is based on stereotypes. Even though I'm
Ukrainian (who are Russians in Western eyes) I practically do not drink vodka, and would claim myself practically uncorrupted.
I'm not engaged in drunken debauches either.
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,920    
26 Jul 2013  #209

Wulkan
The addiiton of Polish equivaletms show that at least in thsi vocabulary selection Russian and Slovenian are extremely close:

Mister - Gospod - Gospodin - Pan
Mrs. Gospa - Gospo - Pani
Star - Zvezda - Zvezda - Gwiazda
Glass - Steklo - Steklo - Szkło
Skin - Koža - Koža - Skóra
Speak - Govorimo* - Govorit`- Mówić
Propose - Predlagati - Predlagat` - proponować
Search - Iskanje* - Iskat` - szukać
Street - Ulitca – Ulitca - Ulica
Work - Delo - Delo - Dzieło, Sprawa
Flower - Cvet - Cvetok - Kwiat
Sense - Smisl - Smysl - Zmysł
Bird - Ptica - Ptica - Ptak
Debt - Dolg - Dolg - Dług
How - Kako - Kak - Jak
Pike - šèuka - šèuka - Szczupak
Trader - Trgovec - Torgovec - Handlowiec

*Those are not infinitives, are they?
Vlad1234 8 | 201    
26 Jul 2013  #210

Skin - Koža - Koža - Skóra
Speak - Govorimo* - Govorit`- Mówić
Search - Iskanje* - Iskat` - szukać
Trader - Trgovec - Torgovec - Handlowiec

In Russian there is also a word "szkura" which stands for thick animal skin. But sometimes could apply to humans as well.
Other archaic Russian word is molwit' which is the same in meaning to Polish mówić.
Szukać and handlowiec are German borrowings from "suche" and "handel".

Those are not infinitives, are they?

If you ask about Slovenian, I'm not sure.

Similarities between Slavic languages often complement each other. Many words that are present in Russian, but not in
Polish could be found in other Slavic languages such as Slovak or Slovenian.




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