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More than one type of love (linguistically speaking)


rozumiemnic 8 | 3,724
30 Aug 2011  #1
IN Polish, does "miłość" refer only to romantic love? Are there words for other kinds of love, for example, maternal, fraternal, friendship etc? I know in Greek there are many words for love,and fear I may have just sent someone an inappropriate message......

Help!!?
pawian 153 | 8,369
30 Aug 2011  #2
I know in Greek there are many words for love,

French love, for example?
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,724
30 Aug 2011  #3
haha not sure about that.....c'mon Pawian, you know what I mean,,help me out here!
pawian 153 | 8,369
30 Aug 2011  #4
.c'mon Pawian, you know what I mean,,help me out here!

I already helped you. :):):)

Are there words for other kinds of love, for example, maternal, fraternal, friendship etc?

Nope. In Polish it is almost always miłość and its nature is defined by proper modifying adjectives:

maternal - miłość macierzyńska

wysokieobcasy.pl/wysokie-obcasy/1,103260,82895.html

fraternal - miłość ojcowska

naobcasach.pl/a.202.Ojcowska_milosc.html

French love - miłość francuska

milosne-pozycje.pl/milosc-francuska.html
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,724
31 Aug 2011  #5
Thank you so much Pawian!
BigBrownEyes 3 | 20
8 Sep 2011  #6
miłość

macierzyńska

uhmm.... i dont know how should i ask this. i mean, a correctly question in english.... well i'll try: how do u write that little stress mark/accent over the consonant (i mean on the computer, not hand writting of course)? what is the sound for them?
gumishu 11 | 4,956
8 Sep 2011  #7
the sound for the 'n' with an 'accent' is very similar to the Spanish n with the wave (as in Espana), other 'accented' consonants are a different story

well you need to have a special keyboard layout installed to be able to use those Polish special characters (you can take them from a windows install disk for example) - you can switch between a couple of keyboard layouts (so you can have a Spanish layout, an English one and Polish one and switch between them) - the most popular Polish keyboard layout is 'Polish programmer's keyboard' which uses alt+'key' (alt+n = accented n) to obtain those special Polish characters
Turbulencja - | 5
8 Sep 2011  #8
you don't really need to have a special keyboard layout installed, unless you want to type in Polish all the time.

Sometimes I need diacritical signs from other languages for my translations and I simply use the Microsoft Word toolbar, but I know that other programs, like Open Office for instance, have these options too.

So, in order to type a Polish word, you need to go to the "insert" option on Word toolbar, then to "special symbols", or "symbols" option, and pick the letter you need from all possible alphabets unfolded there. I guess the list only lacks Sanskrit.

Unfortunately, if you need to type a long text in Polish, this technique is time-consuming :) I only use it for single words or sentences..
BigBrownEyes 3 | 20
9 Sep 2011  #9
I see, so that n sounds like ñ, (i speak spanish), so maybe it wont be so difficult to speak Polish. Thank u for ur answer..!

Unfortunately, if you need to type a long text in Polish, this technique is time-consuming :) I only use it for single words or sentences..

Yes, great idea, ur right too. Thank u. =)
gumishu 11 | 4,956
9 Sep 2011  #10
no - it will be difficult for you to render a good couple of so called 'soft' consonants (they are called palatalized linguistically - podniebienne - precisely those ś's, ć's, ź's and dź's

- note: some of the sounds of Polish language are written using two letters these are - sz (English equivalent sh), cz (English and spanish equivalent - ch), dż - (English equivalent is j in 'journey'), rz (sounds the same as 'ż' in speech - it equals the sound for the second 'g' in English word 'garage', also equals French 'j' sound), and there is also that 'dź' thing which lacks equivalents in Western European languages, both 'h' and 'ch' are used to denote a sound that is near the spanish 'x' in 'Xavier' (historically 'h' and 'ch' were different sounds in Polish) - oh I've forgotten about 'dz' (it is a non-palatalized version of 'dź' and so lacks Western European equivalents)

anyway it is a good idea to start learning Polish from the alphabet and basic phonetics - there are some 'stickies' in the General Polish language which have links to Polish learning resources on the web General Language - you can also use ivona.com to hear how Polish words are pronounced (you enter a Polish word into a box and you can choose to hear it pronounced by one of a couple of available voices - this is a free speech synthesizing software)
BigBrownEyes 3 | 20
9 Sep 2011  #11
Thank you for such a good information Gumishu.


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