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What do you like in Polish language?


zetigrek    
13 Aug 2010  #1
loose things, everything wich goes to your mind...

When I was young teeny I bacame a lil bit perv about word Bazuka. I have no idea why but it made me laugh (and made laugh my friend who discovered that this word is funny)
wildrover 98 | 4,457    
13 Aug 2010  #2
about word Bazuka.

bazuka are big tits aren,t they...?
Zed - | 196    
13 Aug 2010  #3
I know this only as an English word "bazooka" (military usage). I don't think I have ever heard it used in Poland. But maybe locally it does have a meaning?
OP zetigrek    
  13 Aug 2010  #4
no it means bazooka... it's just funny word

I had also porblem with name of the street Jaracza...
noreenb 7 | 558    
13 Aug 2010  #5
I like Polish language but I am in love with English now and I can't get over it.
I am addicted to English. I've just realised it now. Funny.
What do I like in Polish language?
Generally?
Simplicity.
;)

English makes me to think too much what is engaging but tiring actually.
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
13 Aug 2010  #6
Wildrover is right! Polish guys refer to busty chicks as having bazookas :)

What do I like in the Polish language? Hmm....without going into specifics, I'd just say the challenge it presents. The endings and exceptions are always sth I am drawn to when I get proficient in a language. The higher-end stuff puts you to the sword.
smurf 39 | 1,991    
13 Aug 2010  #7
swearing, swearing in Polish is a ton of fun.

oh and how people say masakre, thats a cool word.

Also the Silesian language is really cool and much easier than Polish,
it's loads of fun when i say Silesian words to the Silesian natives, they love the fact that I'm making the effort to learn the local lingo
RysiekK 6 | 38    
13 Aug 2010  #8
Bazookas are weapons in the military sense ... and female weapons in the "tit" sense :)

Cześc
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #9
Silesian is pretty cool. I like the fact that I could fox a Pole with it :)
NorthMancPolak 4 | 649    
14 Aug 2010  #10
It doesn't take much.

Even something as simple as Idę na pole usually does the trick

:D
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #11
That's Krakowian, NMP. They say na dwór here. I'm talking true Silesian which is highly Germanic. I ran a thread on it on PF.
NorthMancPolak 4 | 649    
14 Aug 2010  #12
Yes, and we agreed that it's also used by real Silesians ;)
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #13
Hmm...not all of them ;) ;) My wife's parents are definitely real Silesians and they don't use it.

They have the classic vowel changes too. For example, mosz zamiast masz and many more.
Sapiens 1 | 13    
14 Aug 2010  #14
Becouse i could use it to communicate with: my family, everyone on street, in shops, schools and other places. It is is very usefull in place where i live :).
NorthMancPolak 4 | 649    
14 Aug 2010  #15
Hmm...not all of them ;) ;) My wife's parents are definitely real Silesians and they don't use it.

They have the classic vowel changes too. For example, mosz zamiast masz and many more.

lol true, but it's like round here - everyone from outside the area thinks that everyone here speaks like Shaun Ryder, but it's just not true - but it doesn't mean they're not "local" :D
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #16
I was listening to Liam Gallagher in an interview earlier today. He wouldn't stop saying, 'know what I mean?'. It was toxic!

Silesian is great to listen to. They can speak away in it and I'll catch most of it. I was primed :)
pgtx 30 | 3,165    
  14 Aug 2010  #17
well, i can tell you what i didn't like in Polish language... something that many foreigners struggle with, even on this forum... it's cases (przypadki)...but i was very young...later on it came natural so there is some hope foreigners... :)
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #18
Oh, I still provide a laugh from time to time with bad selection :) Humility teaches us much :)

Much worse is my soft Scottish pronunciation of Polish words. I have problems with cipa and czipa. Other ones have gotten me into trouble too :)
pgtx 30 | 3,165    
14 Aug 2010  #19
I have problems with cipa and czipa.

i don't understand how would you use that in a class....lol
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #20
It wasn't in a class, pgtx ;) ;) It's too risque to bring it up there ;0

My wife has bigger problems when she was younger, LOL. She couldn't pronounce W as in wujek. She said chujek, LOL. Chujek and Ciota for uncle and aunt, ROTFL
pgtx 30 | 3,165    
  14 Aug 2010  #21
she was younger, LOL. She couldn't pronounce W as in wujek. She said chujek, LOL. Chujek and Ciota for uncle and aunt,

lol.... kids are funny that way.... i still remember some words me and my brother made up as children, but i keep them for myself...lol...everybody forgives a child and everybody giggles with a foreigner...:)
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #22
That's pretty much it :) :)

I was once told that I said cipy instead of chipsy when I was a beginner in Polish but I have no recollection of this. I certainly wouldn't do that now.

I like the challenge of the endings when counting. I sometimes mistake ów for ek but I feel it better now :)
pgtx 30 | 3,165    
14 Aug 2010  #23
I said cipy instead of chipsy

i say sometimes cipsy, but nobody understands that because nobody speaks Polish here, just one of my friends, but she knows so it's no fun...lol
Seanus 15 | 19,741    
14 Aug 2010  #24
Anyway, enough of those references :)

I just like the feeling of being able to use another language with relative comfort. You feel more included and also know that you still have a fair bit to learn. Another factor is the general propensity not to complicate. It was the same when I spoke Japanese, they didn't use a lot of their language in order to keep it simple.
Zbojnik - | 22    
14 Aug 2010  #25
I find English to be very cold, good for descriptions. However w/ the Polish language they add these endearing endings to words which make them sound sweet, like ka, or cek
Richfilth 6 | 415    
14 Aug 2010  #26
Polish is the fifth language I've tried to learn, and I'm finding it the least enjoyable. The concept of cases I can understand, but the level of redundancy (making every single adjective agree with the gender, case and plurality of the noun, for example) a real chore. It's also crushing to make a tiny difference in pronunciation between "i", "e" and "y", and then have Poles look at you with blank faces and then a "bardzo nie rozumiem".

On the plus side, I found in Tesco's last night a little book in the "Male Tablice" series for gymnasium/high school students; "Male Tablice: Jezyk Polski" is an 80-page compendium of grammar tables. It's in Polish, but to have a quick reference book with, it seems, EVERYTHING in it, for 7 zlotys, is too good to miss.
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595    
23 Aug 2010  #27
Idę na pole

They say na dwór here.

North v.s. South war. :)
ShortHairThug - | 1,104    
23 Aug 2010  #28
No Pan vs chłop war
(Pan idzie na pole doglądać swojego, a chłop idzie na dwór pracować u Pana)
Riddle solved.
z_darius 14 | 3,971    
23 Aug 2010  #29
This is how it worked:

"dwor" was a settlement including buildings and some constrained area outside of the buildings. The same person could then say "ide na dwor" i.e. outside of a building but within the constrained area. From there the same person could go "na pole" i.e. outside of "dwor".

Similarly, someone being outside of "dwor" ( a person who was already "na polu) could "isc na dwor".

Historically, "na dwor" was typical of Poznan, Warsaw, Lvov. Krakow Kielce regions used "na pole". Since the political and hence cultural influence shifter over the centuries, so did the language. Hence, "na pole" is now considered a regionalism.

It is also worth noting the difference between "isc na pole" (to go outside) and "isc w pole" (to go to work in the field).
obserwator    
24 Aug 2010  #30
Oh, I still provide a laugh from time to time with bad selection :) Humility teaches us much :)

Much worse is my soft Scottish pronunciation of Polish words.

So "cielęcina" must be your word of choice :D


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