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Are the languages of Russian and Polish similar at all?


Lyzko
22 Jan 2011 #61
Ah yes, so it is. So sorry, old man. My error. I supposed the screen image looked a tad blurry and I couldn't make out the 'o'!

-:))
Wiedzmin_fan - | 79
22 Jan 2011 #62
rzygać in Polish means to puke
rzygi in Polish mean the things you had puked
obrzygany in Polish means that someone puked on you so you are obrzygany
zarzygany means that you puked on yourself or someone puked on you

fantastic! thanks :) that clarifies things.

rzygać = rygat' (in Russian)
rzygi = otryzhka (milder version of "blevotina" / from blevat' )
obrzygany = obryganyi / obryganaya
zarzygany = zaryganyi

So, zazhigalka is simply a different word. From zhech' (put something on fire).
Lyzko
22 Jan 2011 #63
The false friends in all closely related languages can range from fatal to plain downright sidesplitting, e.g. 'pukać' = to knock (in Polish), 'pukat' = to fart (in Russian) etc...
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
22 Jan 2011 #64
One of many words common for all slavic languages

Yes thank you profesor, I just gave a few example there are thousands of words that are the same or similar in Polish and Russian. Not all are same in Slavic languages like samolot which is same in Polish and Russian, in Czech is different, letadlo.

pozar Polish pozhar Russian
jeszcze raz Polish yeshche raz Russian
wy widzicie Polish Vy vidite Russian
Albinoni - | 7
22 Jan 2011 #65
Pozor is attention in Czech
whereas in Russian it means shame, disgrace

As a native Russian speaker you're really taken aback when driving along streets in Prag...
Wiedzmin_fan - | 79
22 Jan 2011 #66
I wanted to share a resource for comparisons - you can
find subtitled Polish/Russian songs and shows on youtube, for example:
youtube.com/watch?v=rn4dPqvGFs0
youtube.com/watch?v=5NSTnU8znag
I learned quite a few Polish words that way.

Cheaper than buying Rosetta Stone CDs :)

As a native Russian speaker you're really taken aback when driving along streets in Prag...

I can imagine! It's almost as funny as seeing the "please fart louder" announcements at the door :)

By the way, *pozor* is still a kind of attention, albeit negative! Let's say it's close enough :)
Sasha 2 | 1,083
23 Jan 2011 #67
Polish uroda means beauty or charm in English and krasa or krasota in Russian.

Urod - an opposite to beauty in Russian, an opposite to "krasiviy,-aya. Someone ugly.
puella 4 | 172
23 Jan 2011 #68
find subtitled Polish/Russian songs and shows on youtube, for example:

I'm Polish and I can understnd only single words. I wouldn't even thought of understanding what they are singing about.
isthatu2 4 | 2,702
23 Jan 2011 #69
As a native Russian speaker you're really taken aback when driving along streets in Prag...

Why,they still not taken down the barricades?;)
Kidding,thats funny re being shamed as you drive....
Lyzko
25 Jan 2011 #70
And 'pozór' can also mean 'a fire' in Polish, correct?
Lyzko
25 Jan 2011 #71
Whoopsidaisy 'pozór'
Lyzko
25 Jan 2011 #72
Perhaps I was confused her with the word 'pożar'-:)
gumishu 11 | 5,991
8 Feb 2011 #73
pozór is mainly appearance in Polish £yzko - like in 'don't judge by appearances' - ' nie sądź po pozorach'

there is a verb pozorować from the noun which means to feign and similar though its use is limited to certain fields and situations and words like udawać are used much more frequently
southern 75 | 7,096
8 Feb 2011 #74
I used the word pozor quite often in Ukraine thinking it would be the same as in Czech and people looked at me strange.
chichimera 1 | 186
8 Feb 2011 #75
Poles who claim to be able to understand a good 60% or 70% of what a Russian says

many of us obligatorily learnt Russian as children at school. I haven't used Russian for years, but I still remember quite a lot and understand a big deal - and I'm pretty sure it's because I learnt it as a kid, not so much because of similarities between the languages. Czech is much more similar to Polish, but I understand less of it than of Russian
southern 75 | 7,096
8 Feb 2011 #76
Czechs understand Russians quite well I saw that myself in Karlovy Vary.Also Czechs understand Poles but Poles do not understand czech I don't know why this happens.
chichimera 1 | 186
8 Feb 2011 #77
Czechs understand Poles but Poles do not understand czech

Really? That's interesting. I don't know many Czech people, but the few times I tried to apply Polish-Slovak conversation rules (which is: a Pole speaks in Polish and gets answered in Slovak and everyone is happy) to my conversations with Czechs, it didn't work. Probably mainly on my part, if what you've said is true
southern 75 | 7,096
9 Feb 2011 #78
Try with Czechs from Ostrava.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 Feb 2011 #79
That's cheating. Ostraváci speak a dialect which sounds more than half Polish to Czech ears ;-)
Lyzko
9 Feb 2011 #80
Gumishu, I'm more familiar with the phrase 'Pozory często milą' = Don't judge a book by its cover (lit. 'The appearance often deceives')-:))

Figured the words just looked similar.

"....mYlą..", I apologize for misspelling it.LOL 'milić' is incorrect, as the verb comes from 'mylić', to be wrong.
Olaf 6 | 956
9 Feb 2011 #81
Да, они похожи, но не так много:)
Lyzko
9 Feb 2011 #82
Spassibo, Olaf-:)
Jellief
9 Feb 2011 #83
Я думаю что русский язык лучше чем польский:D И они не очень похожи..
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
9 Feb 2011 #84
Неправильно думать.

Языком этого форума является английский
Sasha 2 | 1,083
9 Feb 2011 #85
Неправильно думать.

"Nepravilno dumat'. Rasstrelat'!"

Makes me think of how the fascists were pictured in the old Soviet movies.

Jellief, every man to his taste.
finland
22 Mar 2011 #86
i can speak finnish and i live in finland and finnish is the second hardest language in the world because of the cases and the endings' that you add to the end of the words. i think polish would be way easier to learn.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
22 Mar 2011 #87
Nobody's saying Finnish is easy, but the world has an awful lot of languages.

As, one might say: ǃqháa̰ kū ǂnûm ǁɢˤûlitê ǀè dtxóʔlu ǀnàe ǂʼá sˤàa̰.

Or even, on a good day, Na-Dené Bizaadjí tʼáá ałʼąą átʼéego saad dah náánáshjaaʼígíí éí Athabaskan dóó Eyak dóó Tlingit daolyé..
Leopejo 4 | 120
22 Mar 2011 #88
i can speak finnish and i live in finland and finnish is the second hardest language in the world because of the cases and the endings' that you add to the end of the words. i think polish would be way easier to learn.

Wrong.

Finnish is actually quite a simple language. Contrary to Slavic or Romance language, the first steps are quite steep, but you will eventually reach a plateau: there isn't so much grammar after all in Finnish.

The problems of Finnish are:
- different feel from Indoeuropean languages, different vocabulary - which is paradoxical, as most lexicon is Indoeuropean, though this usually doesn't help much, as both Finnish and Indoeuropean languages have changed the original words in different directions;

- pronunciation, but there actually isn't any sound you don't know from English/French/German. Ä, Ö, Y aren't so difficult after all.
- cases, a good number, 14(15), but of these six are locational (w, na, do, od/z) and some are very rare, relics from the past. That leaves only 3(4) cases: nominative, genitive, partitive (and accusative, which is equal to one of the others).

- consonant gradation: word stems, both nouns and verbs, get specific changes, especially with K/P/T - something Polish is full of too.

On the other hand:
- the verb system is easy, there's even no future tense
- almost no prepositions, which cause so many headaches in other languages (w vs. na in Polish, all Romance languages, English phrasal verbs)
- you pronounce as it's written, fixed stress, no omophones (u/ó, rz/ż, ...)
- very easy sounds, for example only one sibilant (?), s and one affricate -ts-, as opposed to s/ś/sz/z/ż/ź/c/ć/cz/dz/dż/dź
- no gender

Just to debunk a myth.
Lyzko
22 Mar 2011 #89
Prepositions are actually "postpositions" in Finnish, I recall. Oh, then there's the partitive genitive vs. accusative-:))

Admittedly however, the above arguments for the comparative 'ease' of Finnish are also fairly strong cases for its difficulty LOL
DRaWz
25 Jun 2014 #90
Dats true so now u make me wanna learn Polish nw... lol


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