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So why did you give up learning Polish?


james2
11 Jul 2010  #1
If you have ever started to learn the Polish language but you stopped - why did you give up?
convex 20 | 3,978
11 Jul 2010  #2
No value outside of Poland. No long term plans to stay in Poland.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jul 2010  #4
Oh really? That's why I can make myself understood to around 40 million people? Communication is what makes a country work effectively. It allows for so many things. Useless? LOL
Miguel Colombia - | 351
11 Jul 2010  #5
That's why I can make myself understood to around 40 million people?

More like 60, but how many of them do you know?

Anyhow, you live in Poland and work there (as far as I am concerned), so it's useful for you.

Not for me.
jonni 16 | 2,485
11 Jul 2010  #6
More like 60, but how many of them do you know?

Or more pertinently, how many of the people you know, speak with most often and are a big part of your life are Polish speakers? This is the reason people learn Polish, not the number of overall speakers of the language.
Miguel Colombia - | 351
11 Jul 2010  #7
So like 2 or 1.

But I won't learn Polish just because of them. Fuck that.
sledz 23 | 2,250
11 Jul 2010  #8
Its a complete waste of time unless youre planning on moving to Poland.

Most Poles living in America speak English or theyll never find a decent job.

Powodzenia:)
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
11 Jul 2010  #9
convex wrote:

No value outside of Poland. No long term plans to stay in Poland.

face some facts, Seanus. the question was addressed to people who stopped learning. the thread is getting answers. and the above, well, that's why 99.9% of the non-poles living here don't bother.
jonni 16 | 2,485
11 Jul 2010  #10
So like 2 or 1.

But I won't learn Polish just because of them. Fuck that.

In many people's situation, far more - even (especially?)nearest and dearest. That's why it's worth persisting.
beckski 12 | 1,617
11 Jul 2010  #11
So why did you give up learning Polish?

Because, people laugh at me when I pronounce Polish words incorrectly :(
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
11 Jul 2010  #12
Because, people laugh at me

So how often do you have a chance to speak Polish in Riverside?
Eurola 4 | 1,906
11 Jul 2010  #13
Its a complete waste of time unless youre planning on moving to Poland.

Hey, how about impressing a polish bartender? :)

Anyway, it it certainly beneficial when you live and work in Poland. Even with a limited knowledge of the language you at least know what is going on around you. I can't imagine living in any country and not to make any attempts to learn the local language and culture.

I did not speak English when I came to the US at all and my priority was to learn as soon as possible. I hated not understanding anything around me.

So, I was in school within a month and the rest is history..
convex 20 | 3,978
11 Jul 2010  #14
Anyway, it it certainly beneficial when you live and work in Poland. Even with a limited knowledge of the language you at least know what is going on around you. I can't imagine living in any country and not to make any attempts to learn the local language and culture

I absolutely agree, it would be ridiculous not to learn at least enough to get you by and be able to have a little bar talk.

That said, I'm in Poland about half of the week, and travel the rest of the time. I conduct all of my business in German and English, and have no long term plans to stay in Poland.

I'm learning Russian at the moment, great traveling language.

I do like Polish though, it's a fascinating language, but just don't have the time to devote to it.
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
11 Jul 2010  #15
Useless language.

That depends.

If you have no practical use for it, or no interest in other Slavic languages, I'd agree. Although I rarely speak it more than once or twice a week these days, I hear it every day. Now that alone makes it useful, because if some Polish pr*ck decides to call me something disrespectful in Polish, and thought I wouldn't understand, they may be surprised to find that I'm calling them an ambulance :)

Seriously though, its helped me in other languages, saved various employers a fortune on interpreters, and helped me work my way round Poland. So for me at least, it's very useful.

However, I rarely bother "learning" any more of it, because I can speak it faster than English, I'm fluent enough to engage in conversation in virtually any subject, I understand it as well as English, and i can read/write as well as I'll ever need. So even if I wanted to, I could never forget it.

I used to think it was a useless language when I was in my teens, and even stopped speaking it completely for a few years, but I changed my mind and I've never looked back :)
beckski 12 | 1,617
11 Jul 2010  #16
So how often do you have a chance to speak Polish in Riverside?

Chances of bumping into other Polish people in Riverside, happen to be very slim. Usually, only places I see other Poles, are at the Polish churches in Los Angeles and Yorba Linda, CA.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jul 2010  #17
It's not a much sought after language in many parts. Poles are kidding themselves if they think most Brits are gonna pay 30 quid an hour which is what some ask for. Why would Brits want to know Polish outside of having acquaintances? They know English, a far more useful language.
Eurola 4 | 1,906
11 Jul 2010  #18
Hey Seanus, I'm glad you find polish useful and in your situation - understandably so.
We all know that English is the primary language (please don't tell the French) but some day it might be Chinese....so if you anyone thinks that polish is hard, think again. lol.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jul 2010  #19
Polish grammar is FAR more difficult than Chinese grammar. The pronunciation is a different story, though.
Sebas 1 | 38
11 Jul 2010  #20
In my case is a on and off thing. I have a son and my wife works in the day so I don't have time. I go to work in the afternoon and come back around 10pm. better the summer is the time of the year when i have more time for myself... my classes started again last week...

polish grammar is a headache!
Polish will be one day my 3rd language.
Eurola 4 | 1,906
11 Jul 2010  #21
Designate one day a week to communicate with your wife in polish only, no cheating.
You'd be surprised how much you can learn in a day! My sister and my brother-in-law did it to me when i was learning English.
Sebas 1 | 38
11 Jul 2010  #22
Designate one day a week to communicate with your wife in polish only

It's worth a try! thanks
Borrka 37 | 594
11 Jul 2010  #23
I'm learning Russian at the moment, great traveling language.

Interesting ... where ?
poland_
11 Jul 2010  #24
In many people's situation, far more - even (especially?)nearest and dearest. That's why it's worth persisting.

I agree with Jonni, if you do not make the effort to integrate u will always be on the outside. Poland has so much to offer when you can communicate. When you speak polish even at basic level, you can really have some fun.
plg 17 | 263
11 Jul 2010  #25
It's not a much sought after language in many parts. Poles are kidding themselves if they think most Brits are gonna pay 30 quid an hour which is what some ask for. Why would Brits want to know Polish outside of having acquaintances? They know English, a far more useful language.

i pay £4 quid for 2 hours- not bad eh.
polishcanuck 7 | 462
11 Jul 2010  #26
For most people learning polish is a waste of time. But for those livin in Poland it would probably be a good idea to learn polish.

The problem with this is that anglophones generally have a "language learning" problem. There are Brits on his forum who have been living and working in PL for +5 years, some like wroclaw even longer I think and still can't speak polish! I'm sure pride also plays a role - wh would a proud Brit learn another language when he can just expect others to speak English o him?

The only Non-polish PF user that I can think of atm who speaks polish is seanus - but he is a smart man and should probably be doing greater things.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
11 Jul 2010  #27
If you really like Polish culture and people, it's not a waste of time to learn Polish. It can be fun and theraputic, learning a different lingo. It's not easy to find Polish lessons and opportunities to take Polish culture classes in the US. You'd have to go to a University with a Polish landguage department for that and not all Universities have them. Most public Universities only offer French, German, Spanish, maybe some Russian. You are lucky if you can find Italian. There's oodles of Spanish classes.

This can make it tough for people wanting to learn Polish. If you do start, for goodness sakes, don't quit.
southern 75 | 7,096
11 Jul 2010  #28
Most Poles are surprised when I explain them how I derive polish from czech words.But slavic languages are always pleasant to the ear just to hear them brings you in a very nice mood especially when combined with pivo.
sledz 23 | 2,250
11 Jul 2010  #29
Hey, how about impressing a polish bartender? :)

You know I know enough already to do that,,,hehehe

If I had the time, sure it would be great to learn the whole language. Although theres not many people here that really speak it, and its not a necessity. So I take my time and that way its not so frustrating!!!!!! lol

If I were going to live in PL, you better believe Id be hitting the books!

Living in the USA a person would be better off learning Spanish
beckski 12 | 1,617
11 Jul 2010  #30
Living in the USA a person would be better off learning Spanish

Especially in California, where the English language is virtually on the endangered species list...


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