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Remembering Polish Atheist Martyr Kazimierz Łyszczyński


Bieganski 17 | 896
5 Apr 2015 #1
While the awe-inspiring "Blood Moon" lunar eclipse which occurred this weekend has instead been spent behind closed doors by Jews marking their Passover and Christians their Easter events, it is appropriate to pause and remember the life of the enlightened Polish nobleman and philosopher Kazimierz £yszczyński who was tortured and murdered in Warsaw on 30 March 1689 for questioning Judeo-Christian fiction in his important treatise De non existentia Dei (the non-existence of God).

For freethinkers there is a video documentary about this great Pole available for viewing here:


johnny reb 31 | 5,725
5 Apr 2015 #2
Indeed a great lesson to be learned here and most appropriate on Christ's Resurrection Day.
Who was the 'enlightened one' and who was the "fiction one'.
I wonder if he still thinks God is 'fiction".
Lyszczynski had read a book by Henry Aldsted entitled Theologia Naturalis, which attempted to prove the existence of divinity. But its arguments were so confused that Lyszczynski was able to infer many contradictions. Ridiculing Aldsted, Lyszczynski wrote in the book's margins the words "ergo non est Deus" ("therefore God does not exist").

enlightened Polish nobleman and philosopher Kazimierz £yszczyński

That is an oxymoran to be 'enlightened' and 'ridicule God existence'.
This was discovered by one of Lyszczynski's debtors, Jan Kazimierz Brzoska, who was the nuncio of Brest in Poland or a Stolnik of Bracławice or Lowczy of Brzesc. Brzoska, reluctant to return a great sum of money to him lent by Lyszczynski, accused the latter of being an atheist and gave the aforementioned work as evidence to Witwicki, bishop of Poznan.

God handled it from there.

the awe-inspiring "Blood Moon" lunar eclipse which occurred this weekend

Yup, there are five "Blood Moons" in this period with all of them falling on festival dates.
Prophesy being fulfilled.
OP Bieganski 17 | 896
5 Apr 2015 #3
I wonder if he still thinks God is 'fiction".

£yszczyński's treatise was destroyed so only excerpts of it survived from what was catalogued in the unjust charges brought against him. However, since he saw religion and thus "God" as existing solely in the human imagination then he couldn't have believed in an afterlife either.

That is an oxymoran to be 'enlightened' and 'ridicule God existence'.

Not at all. £yszczyński logically saw "God" as a creation of humans and not the other way around. He simply took fanatical superstitious beliefs dreamt up by Middle Eastern cave dwellers and saw them for what they were.

The Age of Enlightenment in Western Europe spanned from 1650 - 1780 and is said not to have reached Poland until 1730. But clearly the Age of Enlightenment in Poland had its first sparks much, much earlier than this. Not only with £yszczyński's writings in the late 17th century but all the way back to 16th century Poland and the groundbreaking work of Mikołaj Kopernik.

Yup, there are five "Blood Moons" in this period with all of them falling on festival dates.

Yes. All the Abrahamic faiths attach many of their important religious festivals according to the seasons and astronomical events. That's why holidays like Passover, Easter and Ramadan always jump around on different dates each year. They are literally chasing the Moon! That makes all of them astrological cults. One might as well just read a horoscope from a newspaper to figure out life and humanity's place in the Universe.


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