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Do any Poles miss the Communist era?


KingAthelstan 9 | 142
24 Sep 2011 #1
I was just wondering if there are any Poles who miss the Communist era in Poland?
pip 10 | 1,660
24 Sep 2011 #2
Probably those who had the most to lose when the wall came down. Gov't officials and other upper management positions.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
24 Sep 2011 #3
Gov't officials and other upper management positions.

Come on... those people "made" millions during transformation and are largly running this country now...
MyMom 6 | 137
24 Sep 2011 #4
Gov't officials and other upper management positions.

I'm afraid they did very well under new system.

Plenty of people miss communism and they don't even know about it - they expect to be given lifetime employment at some factory like it were their birthright and they will go on the streets protesting when their "zakład" goes bankrupt.
pip 10 | 1,660
24 Sep 2011 #5
Come on... those people "made" millions during transformation and are largly running this country now..

ya, I suppose you are right
pawian 177 | 14,635
24 Sep 2011 #6
=pip]Gov't officials and other upper management positions.

As other guys explained, its is rather a false conviction although I suppose that some ex-commie guys who are big shots in finance/business today prefer political power to economic power. So, I can imagine some of them regret the collapse of communism.

But people who truly deplore the fall of the system are these: workers of state farms called PGR.

Polish shoes
Seanus 15 | 19,706
25 Sep 2011 #7
Of course they do. Can't you see? ;) If sth is truly forced upon you and you truly want to shake it off, you will. True character should shine through thereafter. Has it?? They had a chance to change to a system that suited them better but they often stuck with commie ways. That's telling!
southern 75 | 7,096
25 Sep 2011 #8
Even Westeners miss the communist era.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
25 Sep 2011 #9
Quite a few are trying to bring it back in their own way. Barroso, for example. We need to update the textbooks for school students as the polarity that formerly defined ruthless capitalism and stauch communism has paled away, totally obfuscated. Look carefully and you will see what I mean. Poland is ripe for the pickings as there are undoubtedly many commie sympathisers here. It's a bit like what I might dub as the Thatcher phenomenon. Most spoke against her yet she won a landslide victory in the elections back in the day. There are many that were comfy under communism here and for different reasons.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
25 Sep 2011 #10
In 90's many people, who were screwed and ended up without any income (ironically often those who fought against commies) missed communism but right now It's rather becoming non-issue... a large part of population don't even remember those times.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
25 Sep 2011 #11
Define the key features of the communist era if you will, Greg. Please give some unfamiliar with the manifestation of it a flavour of what it was about and how one could tangibly see it at work. Thanks!
southern 75 | 7,096
25 Sep 2011 #12
Generally in communist era nobody took any initiative.They expected everything from the government.In this way there was no responsibility and a general passivity and laziness ruled but this is not bad as it is closer to the human nature.
milky 13 | 1,657
26 Sep 2011 #13
Sound like passive consumerism to me.
The international system at the moment that is prevailing is Inverted totalitarianism.
I think Poland is still Gods playground.
southern 75 | 7,096
26 Sep 2011 #14
Poland was the only country in the world to produce the fanatic communist and fanatic catholic type.The sly Czechs preserved the atheism as a positive communism heritage.
pawian 177 | 14,635
26 Sep 2011 #15
Poland was the only country in the world to produce the fanatic communist and fanatic catholic type.

Examples are needed to support such a thesis. Otherwise, it is just crap.
southern 75 | 7,096
26 Sep 2011 #16
You fail to understand the irony.
pawian 177 | 14,635
26 Sep 2011 #17
There is no irony when History, the Teacher of Life, is involved!!!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
26 Sep 2011 #18
Southern, I like your post 12. It's pretty much the same now in parts. So much laziness, walking around and not taking responsibility for anything. As long as jibber jabber, aimless drifting and ducking of this and that are permitted, it gives off the appearance of communism.
jochemczyk 1 | 35
1 Dec 2011 #19
'King Athelstan' I have met many in Poland and in Uk ,never met one yet that liked communism. I'm curious about your nationality and if you have travelled out of Uk, also your age and personal experiences with Polish people or other nationalities. Would you care to share? Lots of people on here with strong opinions ,just wondering what they are based on.Only a few are sharing their personal histories and nationalities. Also your user name is interesting,would you care to tell how you chose it? It is not a requirement to give this type of info., but I]m beggining to think that it should be.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Dec 2011 #20
My mother-in-law misses communism. She often talks of the certainty that existed then. Quite a few older Poles probably did ok under it.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
1 Dec 2011 #21
Quite a few older Poles

I don't think they miss communism they miss those days, their youth. The only good I can think of was order and respect for the law.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Dec 2011 #22
I don't think they miss communism they miss those days, their youth.

Where life is circumscribed, paradoxically freedom flourishes. Saudi Arabia is a good example of that today. Also organised socialism with its clubs, associations, co-operatives fostered cameraderie. Then suddenly it was every man for himself.

The only good I can think of was order and respect for the law.

That hasn't much changed - if anything people are becoming less cynical.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Dec 2011 #23
The socialist sentiment is stronger amongst them than you think, Penn. The state was their saviour.
a.k.
1 Dec 2011 #24
Also your user name is interesting,would you care to tell how you chose it?

Jo it's easy. He's an English nationalist. He came here to rant about Polish people taking British jobs and benefits and not integrating and et cetera.

You can find here also a resident Welsh nationalist (hudsonhicks) and a resident Irish nationalist (RevokeNice). We are only missing a Scottish one.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Dec 2011 #25
Noimmigration was. I won't fill his boots.

Most people here do balk at the mention of communism, right enough. Then again, they did the same to Thatcher in Britain but still she remained popular for so long.
pawian 177 | 14,635
1 Dec 2011 #26
The only good I can think of was order and respect for the law.

It is a myth.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
1 Dec 2011 #27
The socialist sentiment is stronger amongst them than you think, Penn. The state was their saviour.

Because it brainwashed them into thinking that way, the state was the people's mother nurturing, taking care of them (at least making people believe that). Meanwhile, they heard stories that people in the west have far more material things and more freedom.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Dec 2011 #28
Yes but capitalism was a roll of the dice that few would even have entertained had they had the chance. Now we can see a change towards avid materialism but as you said, entrenched attitudes take a long, long time to phase out.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
1 Dec 2011 #29
Yes but capitalism was a roll of the dice that few would even have entertained had they had the chance.

The way the Polish and all Eastern Bloc economies fell throughout the whole 80s I doubt if communism remained Poland would have been in a better state during those troublesome years of the early 90s.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Dec 2011 #30
I was talking more about the early days where people had jobs. They didn't have too much to complain about on that front but, as we know, there were harsh aspects which manifested themselves.


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