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Study Shows Irish Voters Rejected the Nice Treaty Referendum Due to Poland's Entry Into the EU


jon357 67 | 16,836
23 Mar 2019 #31
things of the sea

That phrase has puzzled me for decades. I use it now. It can't be to do with "sailboats" which she mentions separately.

Love her politics or hate them, at least she's an actual Irish politician who certainly knows what she's saying.

Anyway, the song rhymes...
Atch 16 | 3,255
23 Mar 2019 #32
unjustifiably by xenophobic welfare queens in Ireland.

I notice you still haven't managed to answer any of the questions I put to you. At least give me the details of the alleged catalogue of rapes, murders and robbery of Poles in Ireland.

And yes, Poland's accession was hard fought and richly deserved.

As was Ireland's in the context of its 800 years of suffering. Read about it, as you clearly don't know any Irish history. Oh and btw we actually fired shots and gave our lives for our independence, unlike Poland who had it handed to them on a platter in 1918 :)

Love her politics or hate them

We can't ignore the fact according to Sh"tty that she is singlehandedly and maliciously responsible for preventing Poland's accession to the EU. Incidentally she also recorded a song in which she taunted Sh"tty about his 'fairytales'.

youtube.com/watch?v=-SWUAXVp-hQ

"I do believe that you believe your fairtyale" la, la, la.
pawian 177 | 14,627
23 Mar 2019 #33
Your ill-informed posts on this topic

No, I just said you are lying and other posters corroborated my opinion. No need to write such lengthy diatribes about nothing, unless you want to practice rhetorics because you will convince nobody.

So, can you finally refer to your lies pointed out to you by Atch?

I notice you still haven't managed to answer any of the questions I put to you

their time has been divided between their big city apartments

That envy of yours is really disgusting. :) Can`t you afford a decent place to live? :):)
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
23 Mar 2019 #34
not a bad record for a neutral country.

Yes,not bad,but the fact remains that Ireland,at least officially,remained neutral during the war.
Despite the support they gave us unofficially,I think that was still a disgusting stance to take.
Especially when loads of Germans were allowed to waltz about in Dublin.
jon357 67 | 16,836
23 Mar 2019 #35
I think that was still a disgusting stance to take.

They had no choice. Geographically, Ireland is extremely hard to defend from invaders.
pawian 177 | 14,627
23 Mar 2019 #36
Despite the support they gave us unofficially,I think that was still a disgusting stance to take.

It is quite understandable and I am amazed you don`t realise it. When did the Irish liberate themselves from the English? In 1921 as far as I remember. 20 years later, if they had joined the allies, they would have had to work with the English again. Come on, do you really suppose that a nation oppressed for centuries will forget everything after 20 years?
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
23 Mar 2019 #37
They had no choice. Geographically, Ireland is extremely hard to defend from invaders.

That is utter BS.
England is even harder to defend and we did not go yellow.
jon357 67 | 16,836
23 Mar 2019 #38
You're about as wrong as it's possible to be.

A small population, a huge coastline in relation to its size and exposed to the Atlantic.

Plus of course they were right in the middle of the Emergence.
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
23 Mar 2019 #39
A small population, a huge coastline in relation to its size and exposed to the Atlantic.

Exposed to.......The USA.......oh yeah,big threat......whereas England was just 22 miles from occupied France.....
Go away Jon.....
jon357 67 | 16,836
23 Mar 2019 #40
Looks like history isn't your strong point.
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
24 Mar 2019 #41
Looks like geography is not your strong point..... :-)
Atch 16 | 3,255
24 Mar 2019 #42
England is even harder to defend and we did not go yellow.

More American English.........dearie me. Although I don't believe the Irish have any reputation for cowardice, quite the opposite. You're confusing us with the Italians :)

Jon is right. If the Germans had landed, with our lack of manpower and military hardware we couldn't have survived a week. Actually, Britain would have had to help out and defend our coastline as well as their own, using resources needed elsewhere.
jon357 67 | 16,836
24 Mar 2019 #43
Although I don't believe the Irish have any reputation for cowardice, quite the opposite. You're

Many examples of bravery throught the years, and many who served in the UK forces during the war.

Looks like geography is not your strong point..... :-)

This from someone who seems to think America is as close to Ireland as France is to Britain.
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
24 Mar 2019 #44
More American English

Oh give it up dear......you must have left England a long time ago not to realise how many "Americanisms" have slipped into our language.

This from someone who seems to think America is as close to Ireland as France is to Britain

Did I say that?
No.
All I said was that England was/is far more exposed to invasion from Europe than Ireland.
Atch 16 | 3,255
24 Mar 2019 #45
"Americanisms" have slipped into our language.

The only people who use that one are Kenny Rogers fans - 'folks just called him yella'.

Read about Operation Green. It might interest you and you might actually learn something.
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
24 Mar 2019 #46
I already knew about this.
It was a ridiculous and impossible plan and was shelved for that reason.
More "Smoke and Fireworks"from you and obfuscation.
jon357 67 | 16,836
24 Mar 2019 #47
All I said was that England was/is far more exposed to invasion from Europe than Ireland.

Oh dear...
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
24 Mar 2019 #48
And what?
The idea that Germany would try to invade Ireland before attacking England is preposterous.
jon357 67 | 16,836
24 Mar 2019 #49
The idea that they'd try to invade Russia is preposterous too.
Atch 16 | 3,255
25 Mar 2019 #50
More "Smoke and Fireworks"

I think you mean smoke and mirrors. You're a bit hazy on your idioms. I don't see that there's any obfuscation involved in stating the undeniable fact (and all the evidence is available if you choose to research it) that Ireland wasn't 'completely neutral' as Sh*tty alleged, because they rendered assistance to the Allies and whilst they interned captured German airmen, they let alllied ones go. Treating the two sides differently is not being neutral. The Irish embassy in the Vatican also smuggled out hundreds of Jews and Allied prisoners of war. That's not being neutral either.
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
25 Mar 2019 #51
I think you mean smoke and mirrors.

No,I meant smoke and fireworks because fireworks are a more powerful symbol than mirrors.....but of course,you think I'm American.....
As for The Irish in WW2,I have nothing but admiration for those that fought alongside The Allies.
And nothing but disgust for the craven behaviour of the Irish government in their subterfuge.
Atch 16 | 3,255
26 Mar 2019 #52
,I meant smoke and fireworks because fireworks

So you invented your own idiom - but you don't understand the original idiom, it seems because 'smoke and fireworks' doesn't have the same meaning.

you think I'm American...

I don't know what you are, but I know that you're not what you profess to be, like so many here. You tell quite a lot of big old porky pies.

subterfuge.

Seems you don't understand that word either ' deceit in order to achieve one's goals'. What deceitful actions did we carry out and what were our goals?
Miloslaw 9 | 2,825
26 Mar 2019 #53
And my response to you got moved to another thread......I wonder why?
Can't be bothered to repost it here.
Atch 16 | 3,255
27 Mar 2019 #54
Because we were wandering too far off the subject of the thread, I should think.

So let's get back to the original allegation, that Ireland specifically rejected the Nice Treaty because of Poland - not because of any of the other accession countries you notice, but of because of Poland in particular. Lies of course. And then we have the supposed violence perpetrated by the Irish against the Polish community in Ireland, More lies. And finally Sh*tty, when asked by Pawian, had no explanation as to why the treaty was accepted second time round especially as the Irish are apparently filled with 'visceral' hatred for the Polish people. Actually, the second time round,we got a concession/opt out from participating in a common European defence pact. One of the reasons the original treaty was voted down was because of perceived threats to Irish neutrality. That was also one of the reasons for the failure of the Lisbon Treaty first time round and the same thing happened, we got an opt out and it passed.

Then of course we have Sh*tty's bizarre reasoning that Poland deserved to join the EU and get 'handouts' because they 'suffered' in WWII (funnily enough he didn't mention the PRL years) but Ireland apparently didn't deserve the same, despite 750 years of oppression,genocide, starvation etc.

Now we just have to wait for Sh*tty to come back and finish what he started - except he won't because he's made a fool of himself and has no intelligent arguments to make.

Worst of all for the Irish was the knowledge that any money taken away would be redistributed to Poles and other Central and East Europeans

The people of "Eastern Europe" were not completely unknown to us Sh*tty because the greedy Irish were the first to put their hands in their pockets, years before any other nation, for the people of Chernobyl back in 1986, and to this day have pumped tens of millions into that community, gone out there in our thousands to help and welcomed the disabled children of Chernobyl into our own homes. We were also among the very first people to go out to Romania when Ceaușescu's regime collapsed and in 1989 Irish people adopted almost a thousand children from Romanian orphanages. Countless Slavic lives have been saved and enchanced through the direct generosity of the Irish people. According to Ukrainian Dr Igor Polivenok who appealed for help in 2015:

"It is unbelievable. It's like a miracle that such a small island has such a big heart. I cannot find the words to express how grateful I am. You have given these poor children a chance of life."
mafketis 24 | 9,139
27 Mar 2019 #55
Ireland wasn't 'completely neutral'

Didn't the president send condolences to Germany's representative in Dublin when Hitler died?

Was that sincere and misguided or a cunning form of the shiv?
Atch 16 | 3,255
27 Mar 2019 #56
He did, the great lummox. I have no idea what 'the shiv' is but De Valera was an odd character in many ways.
mafketis 24 | 9,139
27 Mar 2019 #57
I have no idea what 'the shiv' is

a shiv is an improvised knife (not made of metal, which would be a shank), metaphorically it's a comment that's neutral or even complementary but which has malicious meaning...

For example Trump to Nancy Pelosi who helped engineer the government shutdown: "Due to the Shutdown, I am sorry to inform you that your trip to Brussels, Egypt and Afghanistan has been postponed." sent while she was on the way to the airport...
Atch 16 | 3,255
27 Mar 2019 #58
malicious meaning...

Thanks Maf :) At whom would the malice be directed? Do you mean he was trying to annoy the British or that he was being facetious towards the Germans? I don't think it's the latter as there's no evidence that Dev was burdened with any kind of sense of humour. I think he was just being infuriatingly literal in observing diplomatic protocol. I wonder if he might have had a touch of Asperger's syndrome or some other kind of high functioning Autism. His demeanour would certainly suggest it.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,839
27 Mar 2019 #59
I wonder if he might have had a touch of Asperger's syndrome or some other kind of high functioning Autism

they all do,, Atch, to one degree or another.
mafketis 24 | 9,139
28 Mar 2019 #60
Well some people say that autism is an extreme version of the male brain (and some autistic habits like raising the heels when walking and wanting to jump over things) seem related to hunting skills in a pre-technological setting..

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