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Double faith - the origin of Crylic writing and Poland


call1n 2 | 138
7 Dec 2012 #1
I would like to know what the Polish position is on the origin of Crylic writing, if the Polish believe his story, on how the pre-christian Slavics could not write, and that those symbols were pulled out of that saints ass!

I also would like to know how double faith played into Polish society as catholic, how that operated under the Grand Duchy of Lithuania Poland, and how that changed under communism.

Thanks!
p3undone 8 | 1,135
7 Dec 2012 #2
calll1n,what country started using cyrillic first?What do you mean by double faith?
Ironside 50 | 11,105
7 Dec 2012 #3
the Grand Duchy of Lithuania Poland

What?
johnb121 4 | 184
7 Dec 2012 #4
WTF does this post mean? And does he not know there was 150 years between the Commonwealth and communism, during most of which Poland did not exist as an independent country?
Bieganski 17 | 896
7 Dec 2012 #5
Cyrillic used in East Slavic languages emerged from the missionary work of the Byzantine Greeks Cyril and Methodius. So the Cyrillic alphabet is based on the Greek alphabet but modified for various Slavic languages. Literacy in Slavic lands grew under church influence just as it did in West European countries.

Ruthenian, which uses the Cyrillic alphabet, was once the dominant language spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. However, during the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth Ruthenian eventually gave way to Polish which uses a Roman based alphabet.

Poland has long been a multi-faith and multi-denominational society.

Christian Orthodoxy once held sway in the early era of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (which by the way was the last pagan country in Europe to convert to Christianity). Again, with the Polonization of old Lithuanian territories, Orthodoxy also lost favor in preference to Roman Catholicism. Although Orthodoxy declined it never disappeared and even splintered in the formation of the Uniate Church.

Communism didn't eradicate Christianity in Poland. The Roman Catholic church played a supportive role to the Solidarity movement.
OP call1n 2 | 138
8 Dec 2012 #6
Cyrillic used in East Slavic languages emerged from the missionary work of the Byzantine Greeks Cyril and Methodius. So the Cyrillic alpet is based on the Greek alphabet but modified for various Slavic languages. Literacy in Slavic lands grew under church influence just as it did in West European countries.

Yes, Do the Polish truely believe this story... that they (the slavics) were too dumb to think of a writing of their own, that Cyrillic could possible be based on....!?

Ruthenian, which uses the Cyrillic alphabet, was once the dominant language spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. However, during the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth Ruthenian eventually gave way to Polish which uses a Roman based alphabet.

I am not refering to the writing, but another interesting point....
I am talking about double faith.... meaning Polish Catholics who still have aspecs of their old faith in their belief.... how would merging with a recent pagan Lithuania effect that double faith?

Christian Orthodoxy once held sway in the early era of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (which by the way was the last pagan country in Europe to convert to Christianity). Again, with the Polonization of old Lithuanian territories, Orthodoxy also lost favor in preference to Roman Catholicism. Although Orthodoxy declined it never disappeared and even splintered in the formation of the Uniate Church.

Yes, and how did this effect underlining pre-christian pagan beliefs omong the Polish?(that secretly coincided with Catholic beliefs)

Communism didn't eradicate Christianity in Poland. The Roman Catholic church played a supportive role to the Solidarity movement.

What was the communist standpoint on pre-Christian beliefs in God?
Was communism scientific rationalism and is was just as forbidden on Catholicism or Orthodoxy?
Or did the Commies view catholicism as pagan, and thus change Catholicism to be more leaned towards Orthodox Christianity?
What about pagan beliefs that are Russian in nature that might have escalated to Poland, how would the Communist view that?

AND LAST BUT NOT LEAST:
What about now?
Zibi - | 336
8 Dec 2012 #7
Call1n must be another uneducated Russian teenager visiting our forum. Sigh......
Bieganski 17 | 896
8 Dec 2012 #8
Yes, Do the Polish truely believe this story... that they (the slavics) were too dumb to think of a writing of their own, that Cyrillic could possible be based on....!?

If there was an earlier purely Slavic alphabet it would exist in some form or another either today in use or in artifacts. I'm not aware of anything that has survived.

It seems you are excluding the reality that early migration and settlement of people look nothing like how we live today. If they weren't nomads then most people worked the land or other craft and usually did not have a very long lifespan anyway. There were no systems of formal or compulsory schools. People were taught languages from family and their interaction with others. Religious orders and the ruling elite tended to be the ones with improved literacy but this does not mean they were literate in the local languages especially if they were foreign conquerors or a stronger organizing force such as the Kievan Rus, Byzantine Greeks, Romans, etc. There are still people today all around the world who can communicate verbally in a language but are unable to read or write in it. Since the same held true in earlier centuries some would have seen no particular use in codifying their language with an alphabet if they had no use or tradition for texts which at one time in human history were extremely expensive and labor intensive to produce and obtain by the general population. One example of the illiteracy of our ancestors can be seen today in the stained glassed windows used in places of worship. They weren't just used for adornment but as a teaching aid for the faithful who could not read or write otherwise.

I am talking about double faith.... meaning Polish Catholics who still have aspecs of their old faith in their belief.... how would merging with a recent pagan Lithuania effect that double faith?

Most would not recognize any pagan influences in their faith. The Christian calendar follows closely with pagan holidays going back to the days of the Roman empire. In Slavic lands you still see the use of pisanki adorned with pagan inscriptions used during Easter celebrations. Some churches are often decorated with branches from trees or reeds during other festival seasons. And perhaps more so in the past than now people or their children with wear traditional folk costumes which are often embroidered or accessorized with pagan symbols and colors. And some areas still celebrate pre-Christian holidays such as dożynki and Noc Kupały.

In order to be successful in their work many missionaries made adaptations or drew comparisons between Christianity and the local customs of the populations they were aiming to convert.

Yes, and how did this effect underlining pre-christian pagan beliefs omong the Polish?(that secretly coincided with Catholic beliefs)

See my previous comment. I'll add that paganism was marginalized by was not completely erased with some elements still surviving today.

Officially communism did not recognize religions as being valid. In practice it was difficult for them eliminate. Too many people grew up with a tradition of one religion or another and in post-war Europe - like any population which suffers a disaster - most people were seeking to preserve traditions as they rebuilt their towns, cities and lives. Such traditions included religion. The communist knew they couldn't alienate their own population by closing down and destroying their places of worship and then look to the West and say how tolerant of a system communism is.

As for today people, especially the young, are mostly not very keen on the idea of being blindly devoted to any religion. But that is not to say they want to see religions as a form of personal expression and tradition be eradicated from the societies from which they live. This is due to many factors such as increased education and experience including exposure to other cultures both the good (like charitable work) and the bad (like institutional child abuse, fanatical intolerance, etc.).
OP call1n 2 | 138
8 Dec 2012 #9
If there was an earlier purely Slavic alphabet it would exist in some form or another either today in use or in artifacts. I'm not aware of anything that has survived.

It survived but anything found, is accounted as being either German, or Greek, or Cryic... but who is to say that Slavics did not originate any of these symbols?

I am not sure you are aware... Lithuanian pagans definately did have a writing system... some could speak some sort of Hindu dialect... And those people could write...

Most would not recognize any pagan influences in their faith

I am not christian. I have no loyalty to say that one sect is pagan and one is not.... I think all Christians in all sects originate in paganism;... Most Majang players think that their way to play Majang is the only way to play... but majang is actually not a single game but many games.... all based somewhat on games existing before it....

Is that a good enough analogy for you?

Officially communism did not recognize religions as being valid.

That does not answer my question: If Catholicism is not valid, doesn't that validate Slavic paganism?

What about slavic union, what is their opinion of pre-christian slavic writing?
And what incentive do non-orthodox Christians have to say, that the Crylic writing was not based on such?


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