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Most important Poles and Slavs that ever lived



NoToForeigners 7 | 853    
7 Feb 2017  #61

@Polonius3
Nope. Not all Poles do that. Many lost respect to him after he was proven to indirectly protect church paedophiles.


Najade - | 19    
7 Feb 2017  #62

@Polonius

let's just say that in a list of geniuses of science and arts, religion should not have a place.
Seeing as religion usually hampers and opposes both.
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
8 Feb 2017  #63

religion should not have a place

Outstanding humanists, ethicians and thinkers such as Albert Schwietzer and John Paul II definitely have a place in the history of human development. Only if we were a society of robots would the pantheon be reserved for the inventors of the better mouse-trap and various e-gadgetarian gizmos.
OP Crow 138 | 5,830    
8 Feb 2017  #64

Pope John Paul II for sure comes among 10 most important Slavs that ever lived. Its because of weight of his historical role and contribution to future of Slavic civilization. We Serbians would remember his outstanding defense of Serbians in the wake of unjustified and illegal NATO bombing of Yugoslavia and Serbia. Without his efforts, pressure on NATO and back then leadership of Poland, NATO, led by mad Clinton clan would initiate full scale ground campaign of my country. It was time when Pope used his authority to stop NATO hawks within Polish government that even so tried to hijack Pope`s efforts and continued to rise voice of official Poland in favor of attack on Serbians, even no matter that great majority of Polish people, parliament and Pope himself sided with Serbia and asked for end of NATO attacks. But finally, NATO stooped, after more then 70 days of bestial bombing of Serbia, with depleted uranium, cluster bombs and guided missiles, where total amount of damage for the country was more then 100 mlrd USA dollars.

So, great thanks to Pope John Paul II for rising his voice for Serbians. Without that voice, my people would face extinction and in turn that would effectively result in the end of Slavic South.
OP Crow 138 | 5,830    
8 Feb 2017  #65

among best candidates:

*** Mikołaj Kopernik (mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe)

*** Maria Sklodowska (physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity, developed theory of radioactivity, techniques for isolating radioactive isotopes, and the discovery of two elements, polonium and radium)

*** Mikhail Lomonosov (polymath, scientist and writer, who made important contributions to literature, education, and science. Among his discoveries were the atmosphere of Venus and the Law of Mass Conservation in chemical reactions. His spheres of science were natural science, chemistry, physics, mineralogy, history, art, philology, optical devices and others. Lomonosov was also a poet and influenced the formation of the modern Russian literary language)

*** Konstantin Ciolkovski (rocket scientist and pioneer of the astronautic theory, among founding fathers of rocketry and astronautics)

*** Dmitri Mendeleev (chemist and inventor, formulated first the Periodic Law of elements)

*** John Paul II (first Slavic Pope, man of peace, gave enormous contribution to freedom of man)

*** Nikola Tesla (scientist, inventor, thinker, philosopher of physics, invented radio (that radio: not Markoni but Tesla invented radio; 40 years after Tesla`s death USA court declared that patent for radio goes to Tesla not to Markoni who stole it while worked for Tesla), designed modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system, father of IIend and IIIrd industrial revolution; III rd ind. rev. still didn`t happen- humanity still isn`t ready, Tesla was more then 200 years in front of his time; by Smitsoniam institute in USA Tesla is considered to be among 10 most important humans that ever lived)

*** Peter The Great (tzar, statesman, humanist; without his contribution Russia wouldn`t exist today, with it Slavic world would be lost because no matter all internal antagonism within Slavic world, Russia still giving balance of power necessary to existence of all Slavs)

*** Yuri Gagarin (first Slav and human being in space)

*** Milutin Milanković (mathematician, astronomer, climatologist, geophysicist, father of modern climatology, explanation of Earth's long-term climate changes, explained the ice ages occurring in the geological past of the Earth, as well as the climate changes on the Earth which can be expected in the future)
NoToForeigners 7 | 853    
8 Feb 2017  #66

Maria Sklodowska

I find the fact of Maria Skłodowska-Curie being called "Maria Curie" in the West very offensive. Maria Skłodowska-Curie was very patriotic, loved Poland, named her first radioactive element she discovered Polon and often fought for polish case. She would be very angry if she could see that her Polish surname is being ignored.
Ziemowit 8 | 2,583    
8 Feb 2017  #67

Maria Skłodowska-Curie being called "Maria Curie" in the West

She was very patriotic, no doubt about it. But as to her name "Skłodowska", she might have legally changed it into "Curie" on marrying Pierre Curie. Thus, she couldn't have been angry about the "rotten" West calling her with such a name.
Ironside 44 | 8,292    
8 Feb 2017  #68

I find the fact of Maria Skłodowska-Curie being called "Maria Curie" in the West very offensive.

It is not offensive. A fact that they actually think that she was French is annoying, by the pop culture she is seen as a raven-haired French lass.
mafketis 16 | 4,725    
8 Feb 2017  #69

I find the fact of Maria Skłodowska-Curie being called "Maria Curie" in the West very offensive

Well in the US, she's always "Madame Curie"

by the pop culture she is seen as a raven-haired French lass

Actually in the US she's a middle aged respectable married lady (maybe with grey[ing] hair).
NoToForeigners 7 | 853    
8 Feb 2017  #70

might have legally changed it into "Curie"

Nope. She legally changed her surname to Skłodowska-Curie not just Curie.
Ziemowit 8 | 2,583    
8 Feb 2017  #71

Damn it! You may be right. On her Nobel certificate it is written MARIE SKLODOWSKA CURIE.

On the other hand, she undersigns her letter in French:

marie
Atch 12 | 1,749    
9 Feb 2017  #72

"Maria Curie"

She's actually known as Marie, the French form of her christian name.

in the West

ec.europa.eu/research/mariecurieactions
history.aip.org/history/exhibits/curie/brief/index.html
web.archive.org/web/20110814005026/http://cosmopolitanreview.com/articles/40-musings/342-2011-the-year-of-marie-sklodowska-curie

She legally changed her surname to Skłodowska-Curie

Where's your source? She was known to use both names certainly, but that's not the same thing.

On the other hand

Yes, she signs herself Marie Curie which indicates that she had no objection to being known as such. Perhaps in her early days it was a bit of a feminist rather than nationalistic gesture, retaining her own name and identity, especially for professional use. Perhaps that's why her Nobel certificate acknowledges her 'separate' status as a scientist in her own right by adding her maiden name.

She would be very angry

I doubt that very much. She was far too intelligent to be so small minded and petty. I think she would be delighted that she is still remembered to the extent that she is virtually a household name in so many parts of the world, whatever form that name takes.
OP Crow 138 | 5,830    
9 Feb 2017  #73

Everything Slavic is regularly ignored in Anglo, Franco, Germanic worlds. Poles should more care if they want their identity and contribution to global science to be known. MARIA SKLODOWSKA CURIE was her name. She was Polish woman and scientist and she was married to a Frenchman. Official Poland should see to protect her name.
Ziemowit 8 | 2,583    
9 Feb 2017  #74

Where's your source? She was known to use both names certainly, but that's not the same thing.

It has crossed my mind, too. I thought that the Nobel prize commitee issuing the certificat for her used the name SKLODOWSKA CURIE on it since it was her legal name. But you say the commitee may have had other reasons for putting the SKLODOWSKA part of the name, so her marriage certificate could clear all doubts. Anyone ready for volunteering to search through France's archives?

Hey, I've just found another Nobel prize certificate for both of them, Marie et Pierre, where the name is Marie CURIE only.




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