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I'm half Polish American, but I'm very Patriotic about my ancestry


BraveRedHussar 1 | 1
8 Jan 2012 #1
Some of my Great grandparents came to America in 1914 from Kraków. Today my paternal family still has strong Polish roots. Now I am obsessed with my Polish heritage.

For instance in my new comic I've been working on there's a character who I implied is from a central-Eastern European nation, a composite of Poland, Hungary, Lithuania and some Czech. And stories I write always have a Polish token guy. I also am a fan of the Polish Winged Hussars (hence my name) and I am very defensive about my ancestors culture.

Does anyone else feel this way? I mean like American or descended Poles like myself. Is this patriotic feeling a normal one?
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
8 Jan 2012 #2
This is a highly subjective area. Attitudes towards one's ethnic roots in America range from total indiffernce (who cares about all that quaint Old Country stuff?!) to the strong patriotic attachment you apparently feel. Those are the extremes and there are countless intermediate shadings in between.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
9 Jan 2012 #3
Some of my Great grandparents came to America in 1914 from Kraków. Today my paternal family still has strong Polish roots. Now I am obsessed with my Polish heritage.

Despite the fact that they came from Austria-Hungary and not Poland?

As for "strong Polish roots" - do they speak Polish fluently?

For instance in my new comic I've been working on there's a character who I implied is from a central-Eastern European nation, a composite of Poland, Hungary, Lithuania and some Czech.

Not bad going - only three of the countries have hatred towards each other.

Is this patriotic feeling a normal one?

You'll grow out of it.
Harry
9 Jan 2012 #4
Fancy a year in Poland working for the good of Poland?
PeterWeg03
9 Jan 2012 #5
Despite the fact that they came from Austria-Hungary and not Poland?

How smart of you to point out Poland didn't exist in 1914. C***.

The definition of nationality is il defined, but religion and a combination of surname and language is sufficient.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,858
9 Jan 2012 #6
Despite the fact that they came from Austria-Hungary and not Poland?

was there really a country called 'Austria-Hungary'? I think not.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
9 Jan 2012 #7
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austria-Hungary

Common usage is to say "Austria-Hungary" to refer to the state that existed after the Dual Compromise of 1867. In Polish - Austro-Węgry.
a.k.
9 Jan 2012 #8
Despite the fact that they came from Austria-Hungary and not Poland?

Delphiandomine are calling into question roots of every single Polish person? All of our great grandparents lived under partitions. Why are you attacking all people from American continent? There is nothing wrong with his intrests in his ancestry.

Not bad going - only three of the countries have hatred towards each other.

Could you stop talking rubbish? How many real life Czechs who has something against Poles do you know? Or how many Poles who "hate" Czechs (I have no idea why anyone could hate Czechs)? There are some strains in Polish-Lithuanian ralationships right now but who really cares from all those oridinary people in Poland?

You'll grow out of it.

Do you wish Polish people who live abroad or of Polish ancestry had no sentiments about Poland?

BraveRedHussar

I'd really wish to see your comics! It must be great!
But remember there are many people who are using patriotic feelings of Polish Americans to gain some political backing. Many of them are manipulating you. Don't let yourself to become a far right-wing nationalist. It's good to be a patriot but when patriotism bacomes angry nationalism then it's against the real idea of patriotism.

but religion

Do you dare to say that Polish non Catholics are not real Poles?
polmed 1 | 216
9 Jan 2012 #9
Despite the fact that they came from Austria-Hungary and not Poland?

It is meaningless to this thread what you have stated and don`t play fool, please

Is this patriotic feeling a normal one?

I would search for your answer somwhere else, because this forum is overtaken by non -Polish posters ( among them the most active are Jews ) for whom Polish patriotism is a form of disease .

For me the answer to your question - yes it is normal and the vast majority of Polish people is highly patriotic .
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,858
9 Jan 2012 #10
OH ok my mistake, I thought it was the 'Austro-Hungarian Empire'. Good old Wiki...;)
But why are you giving this guy a hard time? As Peterweg said, nationality is about language and name (and self identification).
Why does it matter to you if some American guy is getting into his 'roots'.......?
PeterWeg03
9 Jan 2012 #11
Do you dare to say that Polish non Catholics are not real Poles?

Who said anything about Catholics or non-Catholics? Its also only one part of the definition and not exclusive.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
11 Jan 2012 #12
It is not unusual for those that persistently knock people who appreciate and activley cultivate their ethno-religious heritage to secretly envy them. All too often the detractors come from broken homes devoid of any real traditons, are at loggerheads with their families and are gauled at the thought of those who come from big,tight-knit, loving families that gather for Chrsitmas, Easter, engagement parties, weddings, christenings, First Holy Communions, anniversaries, graduations, funeral banquets, etc. No pub crawl with drinking mates can match that sense of togetherness, belonging and fellowship!
Harry
11 Jan 2012 #13
It is not unusual for those that persistently knock people who appreciate and activley cultivate their ethno-religious heritage to secretly envy them.

Yes, in reality I'd love to be a racist bigot too.
Sidliste_Chodov 1 | 441
11 Jan 2012 #14
I'm half Polish American, but I'm very Patriotic about my ancestry

How can you be patriotic about ancestry? I think you mean you are patriotic towards the nation of some of your ancestors.

And stories I write always have a Polish token guy.

lol :) I bet he looks like Andy Sipowicz :D

Does anyone else feel this way?

Well, I was brought up to speak the language in a family of Polish immigrants, I married a British-born Polish woman, and I maintain contact with Poland and its culture. But I work and pay taxes over here, and my entire daily life revolves around the UK, so I have no reason to claim that I should defend Poland. I have much more reason to defend the UK, if it became necessary to do so.

Poland (and Polish-born people) couldn't care less about people like me anyway - we're just "Angole" to them. It's sad that Poles feel this way, as not all nations consider their descendants like this; but that's the way it is, and I don't lose sleep over it.

So I'd say that I'm patriotic towards the UK, not Poland. Claiming to be a Polish patriot would effectively be like joining the Foreign Legion and claiming to be patriotic towards France. I may be of Polish origin, but Poland's not my country.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
11 Jan 2012 #15
Brave,etc. This guy should be your role model. I have rarely heard such good sense regarding Polish roots on this forum.
Nice one Sid.
Jednoralski 1 | 5
11 Jan 2012 #16
I have split loyalty. My great grandparents on my father's side were exiled by the Germans in 1884, from the area around -alno, Poland, and I am very interested in learning more about the family and area. The Germans apparently followed the family to the USA, possibly killing my great grandparents first three sons, in the USA. Now since my grandparents and parents have passed away, it is hard to find out information. My father changed his last name in 1918, when his uncle was killed in the Chicagoland area (unsolved murder) and his older brother died. I am proud of my Polish roots and changed my last name back to the Polish family name and a member of the Polish Genealogical Society of America, in Chicago. I grew up in Chicago.

My mother's side has three American Revolutionary War ancestors, two American Civil War GAR great grandfathers and Kansas homesteaders. My aunt on my mother's side was into genealogy, and has my mother's side tracted back in Europe to about the 800's.

I wish I could go half that far back on my father's side, and with an uncommon name (in Poland and the USA) of Jednoralski, I have got back to about 1750's in -alno.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,858
11 Jan 2012 #17
Poland (and Polish-born people) couldn't care less about people like me anyway - we're just "Angole" to them

right Sid, it's like me with the Irish.....I have an Irish name and immigrant dad, and a certain family vocabulary, but if I went over to Ireland I am just another Brit to them. Which is why I identify with my accent, my mum, my passport, and my place of birth, that is, England.

Spot on post.
Just imagine if every Plastic Pole and Paddy from America came back over.......;D
polmed 1 | 216
11 Jan 2012 #18
we're just "Angole" to them. It's sad that Poles feel this way, as not all nations consider their descendants like this;

It is just your life`s ezperience not mine or other Polish citizens feelings , so don`t generalize about our feelings toward British Polonia , because it is not true.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
11 Jan 2012 #19
Some of my Great grandparents came to America in 1914 from Kraków. Today my paternal family still has strong Polish roots. Now I am obsessed with my Polish heritage.

this to me sounds like a made up thread to get the whole forum going again..

who in their right mind would come in saying this??

Does anyone else feel this way? I mean like American or descended Poles like myself. Is this patriotic feeling a normal one?

and this sounds like a del statement cause he has never felt that Americans of Polish decent should be patriotic

I dont need a crystal ball to figure that out. :)

all I can say is,, what ever floats your boat.. and if your boat dont float you have a problem!!
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
11 Jan 2012 #20
Despite the fact that they came from Austria-Hungary and not Poland?

As for "strong Polish roots" - do they speak Polish fluently?

Man.. Delph, why you always come at people at with this ****? Poland was still partitioned at that time, didn't exist on the map so what the Poles born in Austria, Russia or Germany weren't Poles anymore? wasn't their fault their country was gone. Blood is more important than some piece of paper, the Germans got that one right. The language? 2nd generation still speak the language of their fathers but later on little or nothing it's like that with any nationality.
hythorn 3 | 580
11 Jan 2012 #21
Delph, why you always come at people at with this ****? Poland was still partitioned at that time, didn't exist on the map so what the Poles born in Austria, Russia or Germany weren't Poles anymore?

it is getting a bit wearing

you need to find another axe to grind

perhaps put some of your energy into the charity work which you expound to undertake rather than wind up Pol Ams
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,858
11 Jan 2012 #22
too rite Hythorn, as isthatu2 rather succinctly pointed out before his post was banished, how do Harry and Delph have time for their successful careers, charidee work, etc, when all they do is slag off PolAms, and anyone with a plan, on here....
legend 3 | 664
11 Jan 2012 #23
Blood is more important than some piece of paper, the Germans got that one right.

I wish every knew this.

A Pole living in Taiwan is not Taiwanese.
A Brit living in India is not Indian.
A Russian living in the Philippines is not a Filipino.

Everyone will always see them as a white person from which country they or their parents were from.
And genes are their to prove it.
Ironside 50 | 11,145
12 Jan 2012 #24
Why you call yourself red-hussar ?
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
12 Jan 2012 #25
Despite the fact that they came from Austria-Hungary and not Poland?

Interesting, according to your logic there was no such thing as Polish-Jews in second republic either over the age of 19, all foreign Jews - Russian, German, Austro-Hungarian. I Love it! Couldn't agree with you more, explains their eagerness to collaborate with the enemy too.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
12 Jan 2012 #26
I wish every knew this.

A Pole living in Taiwan is not Taiwanese.
A Brit living in India is not Indian.
A Russian living in the Philippines is not a Filipino.

Yes thank you

it is getting a bit wearing

you need to find another axe to grind

Where did you come from? I don't wind anyone up, but no one should put anyone down for feeling a certain way. It should even be encouraged.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
12 Jan 2012 #27
I have an Irish name and immigrant dad, and a certain family vocabulary, but if I went over to Ireland I am just another Brit to them. Which is why I identify with my accent, my mum, my passport, and my place

If your dad is Irish, so are you. In the eyes of the law. You arean Irish citizen. You dont even need to apply for it. If you are born to an Irish parent, you are, de-facto an Irish citizen.Betcha didnt know that, eh?

In some parts of the world, they are a lot more welcoming to Irish citizens than British citizens. It would be in your interests to obtain an Irish passport as there is no charge.

I wish every knew this.

A Pole living in Taiwan is not Taiwanese.
A Brit living in India is not Indian.
A Russian living in the Philippines is not a Filipino.

And vice versa. Very aptly put. You cannot be Irish/Whatever at lunch time and then suddenly morph into a Pole/Whatever by dinner time(due to naturalisation).

Delph, why you always come at people at with this ****?

Good question. He was an uber Brit. Then a Scot. Then a Pole. Next he will become a europhile.
BBman - | 344
12 Jan 2012 #28
Do you wish Polish people who live abroad or of Polish ancestry had no sentiments about Poland?

Delphi hates the US and americans in general. He also feels superior to Poles. His greatest nemesis is an American of Polish descent and therefore always lashes out when someone like this shows interest in their polish heritage. he is just a miserable british twat living in Poland. I suspect he is jealous that poland is enjoying her freedom whilst the english are firmly holding his scottish brethren by the balls.
Harry
12 Jan 2012 #29
" A Brit living in India is not Indian."
They most certainly can be Indian and British. My grandparents were.

But here's one for you: a Canadian who lives in Canada on money which h he extracts from the Canadian government is a what? I'd be thinking that he is very much a Canadian.
pip 10 | 1,659
12 Jan 2012 #30
i think many of you are mixing up ethnicity with citizenship. A russian born man most certainly can become a taiwanese citizen- their slavic ethnicity doesn't change but their citizenship does.


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