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Being ashamed of Polish ancestry?


slavia
23 Feb 2012  #1
Do people with at least second generation polish ancestry in a foreign western country feel ashamed of their polish descent? I'm polish myself living in poland and I often notice americans of polish ancestry very often hide their polish ancestry here and act arrogantly like they were anglo. To be honest when I speak face to face with western people I feel somewhat inferior even in my own country. But I guess it has much to do with the fact that my interlocutor speaks better english.
terri 1 | 1,621
23 Feb 2012  #2
If you have time, read David Crystal on the subject.
You will find that second generation are somewhat 'ashamed' of having Polish roots,
Third generation will feel themselves 'natives' of their birth-country and the fourth generation will stand up and say: "Some of my ancestors were of 'foreign extrction' why have my parents not taught me anything about my ancestors and their language - and these 4th generation people they will go hell for leather to get to know everything about Poland and their own roots.

This is how it always was and how it will be.
ladykangaroo - | 165
23 Feb 2012  #3
act arrogantly like they were anglo

They are :)
a.k.
23 Feb 2012  #4
americans of polish ancestry very often hide their polish ancestry

It's because they are objects of humilating jokes. On this site you can also find such people - they not only deny their ancestry but also resort to putting down other Poles.

It's only an American thing.
polishmama 3 | 280
23 Feb 2012  #5
I assume you are also specifically meaning a particular generation. I highly highly recommend reading the book by Mieczyslaw Biskupski, "Hollywood's War with Poland, 1939-1945". It will clue you in just how bombarded a couple of generations were by Hollywood's racist attitude towards Poland and the reasons why. It all comes down to Politics.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
23 Feb 2012  #6
It's only an American thing.

Desperation to belong I suppose, not quite sure of what they are so there’s the need to prove themselves. I do not view them as Polish, you are what you feel in your heart, the right to be Polish has to be earned.
billpawl - | 32
23 Feb 2012  #7
Is this thread serious or a satire? Polish-Americans tend to be quite proud of their ancestry. If anything, some Polish-Americans apparently put some people off by being too vigorous in their pride, as witnessed by several threads on this site where they are chastised for feeling any connection to their ancestry and are called "plastic".
EM_Wave 9 | 311
23 Feb 2012  #8
Polish-Americans tend to be quite proud of their ancestry.

Not really. Just the ones that visit this site (naturally).

Anyway, not all Americans boast about their ancestry. This isn't something exclusive to Polish-Americans.

For example, I have mixed ancestral roots but I don't really see the need to take great pride in everyone of my ancestors' nationalities.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,700
23 Feb 2012  #9
For example, I have mixed ancestral roots but I don't really see the need to take great pride in everyone of my ancestors' nationalities

well if you choose to not know or dont care thats your choice, if you have like 10 different mixes it would be hard to
figure out, none the less interesting if you could even count that high. :)

Not really. Just the ones that visit this site (naturally).

oh we have a new cencus enumerator who happens to know that the whole population of Polish Americans that he knows
Personally Arent Proud of their Ancestry.

put some people off by being too vigorous in their pride

Yeah, supposedly we wave keilbasa and make t-shirts and prance around..

I think those that spend so much time thinking about all of this need some serious help, because I certainly dont
spend so much time wondering why so many other nationalities that come to this site (POLISHFORUMS) why they
are wannabe Polish Either. its not my style.. and it would be wrong of me to accuse so many people of something
so foolish as that now wouldnt it.

because they obviously come here because they feel connected in some way, otherwise they would be on another forum
making waves now wouldnt they? Or would they?

Tune in next time for Trollers of the forum continues saga.

Please lets grow up folks, please lets discuss it like adults, we all can do this, its the accusations and stupid comments
like this one which sounds so bi-polar its not funny.. well it is funny, but thats beside the point.

Desperation to belong I suppose, not quite sure of what they are so there’s the need to prove themselves. I do not view them as Polish, you are what you feel in your heart, the right to be Polish has to be earned.

Thug, you shouldnt have wrote you are what you feel in your heart cause it takes away from the other stupid part of your paragraph

now I have to wonder WTF your saying.. cause it sounds like your nipping the bottle babe.

anyways... I love that I am American of Polish decent, I love my grandparents for bringing our family here, the struggles, as a kid
I didnt know any of this, but bullys would say stupid shyt to us as kids and we would hate being Polish, least thats my younger view

now as an adult, learning that this was only bullying, I appreciate that my grandparents came here, they sacraficed alot but made it
thru it and they did what they had to like anyone else's grandparent would to survive.

And to boot they had to put up with jealous family on top of it.. no one was stopping those who decided to stay from coming here too

they had options they choose to stay.. the world is a big place and if you have the wind against your back you will only move forward

Thats what they did

so thats my story and I am sticking to it.. :)
billpawl - | 32
23 Feb 2012  #10
Not really. Just the ones that visit this site (naturally).

I don't know if you live in the US, but I really wouldn't agree with that. Then again, the US is a huge place, so maybe some areas are different than others. I certainly wouldn't agree that that's the case within 100 miles of Chicago or Buffalo(where I live). And to the original poster, its been almost 20 years since I've been to Poland, but I never felt superior to Poles, and I certainly hope I never gave that vibe to anyone.
EM_Wave 9 | 311
23 Feb 2012  #11
Well, certain areas like Chicago and Greenpoint are exceptions, but in general people don't go around wearing a shirt with their ancestors' national flag.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,700
23 Feb 2012  #12
people don't go around wearing a shirt with their ancestors' national flag.

does the general population in Europe and other countries go around wearing their national flag?
EM_Wave 9 | 311
23 Feb 2012  #13
Listen patrycja, even Polish immigrants who come to America are sometimes willing to totally forget where they came from. I've banged my fair share of Polish women and most of them have said they want a green card so they never have to return to Poland.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,700
23 Feb 2012  #14
I've banged my fair share of Polish women and most of them have said they want a green card so they never have to return to Poland.

so your basing your observation on that?

There was also a fair share that came to America only to work and went back to stay in Poland,

I know there are plenty who wanted to forget, this was typical of some ( not all) Polish Immigrants during early
Immigration.

As for all the chicks you banged.. TMI EM_WAVE MY FRIEND>> TMI
peterweg 36 | 2,316
23 Feb 2012  #15
Polish women and most of them have said they want a green card so they never have to return to Poland.

They don't need a green card to never have to return to Poland, they have a EU passport - far more valuable and versatile.

Then again, you're a a bullshitter with an agenda, so its probably best to ignore your comments.
EM_Wave 9 | 311
23 Feb 2012  #16
I honestly never heard that an EU passport can let immigrants live and work in the USA permanently. lol...
billpawl - | 32
23 Feb 2012  #17
Well, certain areas like Chicago and Greenpoint are exceptions, but in general people don't go around wearing a shirt with their ancestors' national flag.

So, are you saying if people don't go around wearing a shirt with their ancestors' national flag, they are ashamed of their ancestry? I wouldn't agree with that. I can be quite proud of my ancestry without outward displays of it(although my in-laws have come to love our Polish cooking, funnily the biggest fan is my Ecuadoran sister-in-law(and she is an immigrant, not a plastic Ecuadoran, as some of the vernacular tends to be around here))
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
23 Feb 2012  #18
Ancestry isn't something that anyone can choose and certainly nothing that anyone should either be ashamed or proud of.
EM_Wave 9 | 311
23 Feb 2012  #19
So, are you saying if people don't go around wearing a shirt with their ancestors' national flag, they are ashamed of their ancestry?

No, I'm not saying that. What I am saying is that people are usually indifferent to what their ancestry is.
Krystal 6 | 95
23 Feb 2012  #20
Do people with at least second generation polish ancestry in a foreign western country feel ashamed of their polish descent? I'm polish myself living in poland and I often notice americans of polish ancestry very often hide their polish ancestry here and act arrogantly like they were anglo. To be honest when I speak face to face with western people I feel somewhat inferior even in my own country. But I guess it has much to do with the fact that my interlocutor speaks better english.

Hi I thought I post this one:

I think you might be interesting to know Polish American born aren't shames to be Polish. I believe they are educating and well known for their roles. You can check it out Famous Polish American born. You should be proud of who is your ancestors.

Famous Polish People born in Poland

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Polish_people

Famous Polish American Born In America or Poland
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Polish_Americans
polishmama 3 | 280
23 Feb 2012  #21
And there are a ton more that are missing off that list. :)
billpawl - | 32
23 Feb 2012  #22
No, I'm not saying that. What I am saying is that people are usually indifferent to what their ancestry is.

If we met today in "real life", would you assume I am amongst these vast leagues of the indifferent because I don't walk around with outward displays of my ancestry?

Anyway, to relate back to the original post, however many Americans may or may not be indifferent to their Polish ancestry, those who are not indifferent are far far likelier to be proud of it than ashamed.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
23 Feb 2012  #23
I have to wonder WTF your saying.. cause it sounds like your nipping the bottle babe.

Nipping on the bottle? I wish, Lent - you know. Nothing of the sort babe; so stop wondering, reading comprehension goes a long way therefore reading what I was responding to as that might shed some light on what actually was said is required not an option if you truly seek understanding.

Ps. How typically Yankee of you. Anyway, I'm glad to see you have acclimated so well.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
23 Feb 2012  #24
Dunno about anybody else, but I'd be ashamed to be called an Anglo, WASP, Brit or suchlike. In terms of geographic extent, the Brits subjugated more people than even the Russians. They conquered, killed, enslaved, exploited and otherwise persecuted entire native populations around the globe. Indeed, the sun never did set on the Union Jack, under which such crimes were committed. In America, it was mainly the Anglos who exterminated the Indians, introduced Negro slavery and persecuted non-WASPs. To top it off, the arrogant Anglos jabbering away in that God-forsaken tongue of theirs, contaminating perfectly good tea with milk (ugghh!) and swilling their medicinal-tasting whisky have the gall to act superior to the rest of mankind!
beckski 12 | 1,617
23 Feb 2012  #25
americans of polish ancestry very often hide their polish ancestry here

No Polish shame here. Just an immense amount of Polish pride :)
Kuba TK 4 | 17
23 Feb 2012  #26
I am a "second generaton" Polish person and I admit that sometimes I am embarrassed to be Polish but only because of those idiots in government and forgive me, but also the "faggots", or offspring of most first generation Americans. Excluding myself, the "faggots" are spoiled "bad eggs" that in some cases don't deserve to live. I curse my parents everyday for bringing me to this country (I was born in the US). I do however attend Polish school every Saturday and have joined a few organizations that have enlightened me of my ancestry. I am proud to be Polish, but I just hate the politicians. I travel to Poland every year to my "other families"(awesome people), and you don't get much information about what is going on in politics. But when I come back to America and turn the TV or computer to read and listen to Polish events, I have heart ache after heart ache. I read a lot of history and I have this bias for Polish events. I tell my friends that Poland has the richest history but they don't want to hear any of it. Well, much said, that's what I think.
BBman - | 344
24 Feb 2012  #27
I would say most are neither ashamed nor proud. It is more likely to come across an American/Canadian of Italian or Greek descent (2nd, 3rd, 4th gen or just part Greek or italiano) who proudly points out his/her Italian or Greek heritage. People of Polish descent here tend to keep quiet about it, not surprising though as Poles (also the irish, Italians (albeit not as long as the Poles), catholics) have been ridiculed by English Americans ever since they first began coming to the US.
Youknowwho
24 Feb 2012  #28
I'm polish myself

No,you are not.You are troll.

often notice americans of polish ancestry very often hide their polish ancestry here

No,you don't.You just trolling here.

To be honest when I speak face to face with western people I feel somewhat inferior

I on the other hand feel superior but not because I am Polish and they are not but because majority of them seem to be retarded.

But I guess it has much to do with the fact that my interlocutor speaks better english.

That's your problem.I am yet to meet a western (or Eastern for that matter) non native English speaker speaking better English than I do.
noreenb 7 | 557
24 Feb 2012  #29
If they hide their Polish ancestry it simply means they have a reson for it.
polishmama 3 | 280
24 Feb 2012  #30
And what reason would that be?


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