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Types of CHEESE in Poland





pingwin 2 | 117    
17 Apr 2007  #32

as for polish cheese... oscypki... oh yes...

oscypki.jpg

My favorite! My mouth is already watering for it. Love it and can't get enough of it. Everytime we go to Chicago I buy it by the tons. I think it's because of all the salt and I love salt.:)
TheDude - | 50    
17 Apr 2007  #33

TheDude likes Mragowski and Krolewski cheese. Both are excellent cheeses :) Oscypek is also fantastic...only if purchased in the Tatry region.
pingwin 2 | 117    
17 Apr 2007  #34

Oscypek is also fantastic...only if purchased in the Tatry region.

So True! Even better when it's nice and warm.
miranda    
17 Apr 2007  #35

Rolada Bieszczadzka - smoked Polish cheese is good too
shopgirl 6 | 929    
17 Apr 2007  #36

My favorite! My mouth is already watering for it. Love it and can't get enough of it. Everytime we go to Chicago I buy it by the tons. I think it's because of all the salt and I love salt.

What does it taste like? Brie? What is it traditionally served with?
It looks like it is pressed into a mold, so it must be soft. Tell me more, prosze!
GrandeSande 2 | 119    
29 May 2007  #37

Polish Cheese

When a recipe (such as that for Sernik) calls for cheese, what kind of cheese is it? Is it what we in America call cottage cheese?
Eurola 4 | 1,912    
29 May 2007  #38

Chicago Delis have cheese called "brick cheese". It's the best for sernik. Cottage cheese is not good for it. You can use "farmers cheese", unsalted. It works too.

Oscypek is made of sheep milk. Górale (Mountaineers) are masters in making it.
It's quite salty, but the flavor is great.

you can see more at:

oscypki.com.pl/oscypek.php?lng=en&OSCYPKI=cafa3d4cd7d8323b264a7a5f7068 a97e
ukpolska    
30 May 2007  #39

Maybe we could introduce this game into Poland, there are enough mad Poles around to try it lol Just a thought are there any mad games like this in Poland? The object of the game is to chase the cheese down the hill and catch it and try not to break your neck at the same time hehe

youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7e5vE-6LDb4
Another view on it:)
sledz 23 | 2,262    
30 May 2007  #40

If you want cheese..

Krysia has a cheese farm in Wisconsin

ya hey dere
krysia 23 | 3,067    
30 May 2007  #41

Chasing cheese down the hill...!
Is it worth it???
sapphire 22 | 1,245    
30 May 2007  #42

it is if you are a hungry mouse... or live in an English village with a strange cheese fetish.
szarlotka 8 | 2,210    
30 May 2007  #43

Chasing cheese down the hill...!
Is it worth it???

Yes - it upholds our fine traditional country ways. Trouble is the liberal do-gooders want to stop all our fun. There is a tradition to run through the streets of a small Devon village, Ottery St. Mary, with a burning barrel of tar on your back. It has gone on every Guy Fawkes night for centuries but now the Health and Safety loonies want to stop it. Just because of a few third degree burns and the occasional singed bystander. We cannot even play conkers anymore without protective eyewear. Go home liberals and let us live dangerously.
clunkshift 2 | 82    
30 May 2007  #44

Oscypek is also fantastic...only if purchased in the Tatry region.

A note for holidaymakers to southern Poland, visit Zakopane on your last full day before coming home; then you can visit the market and slowly wander round all the cheese stalls, eating free samples of the different flavours at each one, and then buy some choice cheeses to bring home.

The different types of country cheeses - goat or sheep, smoked and unsmoked, eaten with wine, port, and beer, (depending on the flavour of the cheese) are wonderful.
krysia 23 | 3,067    
30 May 2007  #45

I was walking through Zakopane's market and they were giving grilled samples of oscypek. That was good....
GrandeSande 2 | 119    
30 May 2007  #46

OK, so I have Googled Oscypek cheese and cannot not find what we have here in CA that is anything like it.

I don't have a Polish deli near me... what sort of cheese would I look for in the supermarket?

What is Brick cheese?

Thanks
Eurola 4 | 1,912    
31 May 2007  #47

Brick cheese is like a farmers cheese, but much less water. Excellent for polish cheesecakes :)
I never met anything similar to oscypki in american grocery stores. There are variety of smoked cheeses, but they are not "it".
GrandeSande 2 | 119    
1 Jun 2007  #48

Thank you, Eurola

I guess I have never seen brick cheese or farmer's cheese called that in the supermarket and I am still confused. So I will have to look more closely for this item.

Have you seen it labeled by either of the above names, or is it called something else, i.e. cheddar, gouda, havarti, etc.?

PS...
I feel like I am rolling down the hill trying to find the cheese I never heard of!

Chasing cheese down the hill...!
Is it worth it???

bunia 1 | 134    
1 Jun 2007  #49

i HATE cheese !
But i absolutely adore polish white cheese - YUMMY !
TWAROZEK *-*
FISZ 24 | 2,117    
1 Jun 2007  #50

goat cheese is the best!!!!

But Cheddar is better :)

Vermont Cheddar that is ;)
sapphire 22 | 1,245    
3 Jun 2007  #51

wenslydale with cranberries is my choice of cheese
drew128 3 | 55    
3 Jun 2007  #52

I just got back from Zakopane and they sell a fantastic cheese there, looks like bread rolls almost, but a great taste. I was told its a local thing, so I guess Asda will not do it:-(

Andy
krysia 23 | 3,067    
3 Jun 2007  #53

Yup, that's oscypek allright
PolishAmerican 1 | 6    
8 Jun 2007  #54

What is the polish spelling for farmer's cheese? Does anyone know?
krysia 23 | 3,067    
8 Jun 2007  #55

There is a similair cheese in Poland called "twarożek"
Lanterna - | 6    
8 Jun 2007  #56

If you like blue cheeses try Lazur, my friend brought it from Poland it's yummy! But when talking about cheeses I start thinking, it has been 6 months since my last visit to Paris........
GrandeSande 2 | 119    
8 Jun 2007  #57

I guess I have never seen brick cheese or farmer's cheese called that in the supermarket and I am still confused. So I will have to look more closely for this item.

Have you seen it labeled by either of the above names, or is it called something else, i.e. cheddar, gouda, havarti, etc.?

Sorry to repeat myself, but...
I never got an answer.... if I want to make Sernik, what kind of cheese do I use here in US?, I don't know what brick or farmer's cheese is called here!!!

Thanks
pennyroyal999 1 | 15    
10 Jun 2007  #58

Very common cheese is "white" cheese (directly translated). It's kind of like cottage cheese, maybe it even IS cottage cheese but it's not as watery. Sometimes people add a little sugar to it and eat it with noodles or small macaroni. I'm not a huge fan of the taste, but if done right it can be very good. This is a common meal in the countryside, considered more of a "poor man's meal" though. Other ways to eat it is to just put it on a sandwich with some butter.
Eurola 4 | 1,912    
10 Jun 2007  #59

add a little sugar to it and eat it with noodles

You can also make white cheese spread with chives and sour cream, salt and pepper to taste. Tons of calories, but very good. You can make it also with sour cream, sugar and cinnamon if you prefer.

I did not see any real white, polish cheese in any large American supermarkets. I don't know where the polish delis are getting it from...I did not buy it for a while and I did not pay any attention to see where it was made.

"poor man's meal"

This poor man's meal is very good if done right! :)
Big Rob - | 72    
14 Jun 2007  #60

If your in the UK, try the Sainsbury's 'taste the difference' range. They are all full flavour, and beautiful. Not processed or homogonised. All other supermarkets fall short. (And I work for one of the other supermarkets)

This is of course for the God of English cheese... Cheddar! Emmental, Brie and Edam are continental cheese's, and beautiful, but I cannot recommend varieties! I hope this helps at least 1 person to a new flavour sensation!




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