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Cooking Polish kiszka


Polonius3 988 | 11,713    
26 Feb 2012  #61

Kaszanka (as it's called in Poland) or kiszka (by the US Polonia) is not raw but sold fully cooked. Most people fry or bake it and serve it warm but it can be consumed like any cold cut.


delphiandomine 57 | 15,127    
27 Feb 2012  #62

Kaszanka (as it's called in Poland) or kiszka (by the US Polonia)

Sorry, just had to quote this.

And the thought of eating it raw is frankly disgusting.
croggers 7 | 109    
27 Feb 2012  #63

I think it tastes dreadful, just saying
JonnyM 12 | 2,634    
27 Feb 2012  #64

Kaszanka (as it's called in Poland) or kiszka (by the US Polonia) is not raw but sold fully cooked. Most people fry or bake it and serve it warm but it can be consumed like any cold cut.

Kaszanka is most certainly not for eating raw 'like any cold cut'. It must be cooked first and can only then be eaten cold.

Kiszka (as made and eaten here in Poland) and kaszanka are very different things by the way.
Polonius3 988 | 11,713    
28 Feb 2012  #65

No, what is called kaszanka in Poland is sold at butcher's across Polish Amewrica as kiszka. There was even a comical hit back when called 'Who stole the kiszka from the butcher's shop?'

And contrary to your erroneous information, kaszanka is fully cooked. Most prefer it warmed up, even crusty, but it can be eaten just as it comes (not raw -- it''s fully cooked). Same wioh parówki (wieners), Most eat them hot off the grill but they too are fully cooked and can be eaten just as they are.
JonnyM 12 | 2,634    
28 Feb 2012  #66

but it can be eaten just as it comes

If your American kiszka is anything like our Polish kaszanka, that would be a very bad idea. Even worse to eat Polish kiszka uncooked.
Polonius3 988 | 11,713    
28 Feb 2012  #67

If you haven't tried it, don't knock it! Admittedly a nip of 50% wódka is highly recommended to promote digestion.
JonnyM 12 | 2,634    
28 Feb 2012  #68

Admittedly a nip of 50% wódka is highly recommended to promote digestion.

Never a bad thing.

Worth mentioning that it's always a good idea to wash any kind of kielbasa before eating.
beckski 12 | 1,619    
28 Feb 2012  #69

Try frying it with chopped apples

Sounds like a tasy combo. Will the recipe work with compote style apples?
JonnyM 12 | 2,634    
28 Feb 2012  #70

It could work well like that but the result would be different. I just add big chunks of apple (red ones seem to work better than cooking apples) to the frying pan. I think that's how the French sometimes cook their version of kaszanka. It works with the potato filled Polish kiszka too.
musicwriter 5 | 87    
29 Feb 2012  #71

Lots of good suggestions for kiszka (barley sausage). It reminded me of a song sung by the leader of a Chicago polka band about 50 years ago; his name was Frank Wojnarowski and the song was entitled 'Who Stole the Kiszka'.
beckski 12 | 1,619    
29 Feb 2012  #72

My dad had the record by Frank Yankovic. He bugged the crap out of my mom, when he'd sing that silly Kiszka song :)
peter carl    
10 Mar 2012  #73

So then Kiszka CAN be eaten right from the package and it doesn't have to be fried first?
Polonius3 988 | 11,713    
16 Mar 2012  #74

Kaszanka/kiszka lovers check this out:
easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/polishsausages/r/kiszka.htm
polishmama 3 | 281    
16 Mar 2012  #75

I've also never heard of eating it raw. I even just asked my Tato about this (who learned to cook from his mother, the best cook in the world). He said "Yuuuuck!" to translate from the Polish version (phew!). To each their own.

wedlinydomowe.com/sausage-recipes/kaszanka
I found this link in English explaining how Kaszanka is made.
Polonius3 988 | 11,713    
18 Mar 2012  #76

If something is fully cooked, then it cannot be raw. It may be warm or cold but not raw!
carter1689!yaho    
9 Sep 2012  #77

Fry it in a table spoon of butter and a table spoon of olive oil,
when cooked crack some eggs ontop, cover , cook utill eggs look done. GREAT!!!
alexa    
25 Oct 2012  #78

I LIVE IN CAPE CORAL,FL,AND COME FROM THE POLISH COMMUNITY OF BUFFALO,N.Y. I HAPPEN TO BE DRIVING IN FT MYERS,AND HAPPEN TO SEE A POLISH INTERNATIONAL MARKET SO I STOPPED...WHAT NOSTALGIA, ANYWAY, I CAME OUT WITH KISZKA AND PIEROGI, AND POLISH TEA., AND I CANT HARDLY WAIT TO TRY THE KISZKA,WHICH I HAVENT HAD SINCE I WAS A CHILD.FROM READING ALL THE POSTS, I REMEBER HOW MY MAMA USE TO MAKE IT...THANKS..ALEXA
Joe D.    
26 Feb 2014  #79

Kiszka is great fried and served with sunny side up eggs and a potato pancake or 2 or 3 or....! If you want to have a real treat fry some onions and a few softened zyby,( Polish dried mushrooms), and add as a garnish. One more thing, if you are frying kiszka use a screen to cover it. It can snap, crackle and pop! I'm getting very hungry now and I just might have to take a drive to Greenpoint!!!
Pol474    
23 Mar 2014  #80

I love Kiszka raw with a little salt. It's a fast start to your day. Just cut off a chunk and go. If you want something more filling add butter and bread or a few crackers. When I do cook Kiszka I like to sauté some onions in a small amount of oil, then add 3/4 inch slices of the Kiszka (about 1/2 the link) and cook till the casing starts to come lose and easy to remove. I then add it all to a bowl of hot, buttered egg noodles and toss. Add salt and pepper to taste. Wonderful for lunch or dinner.
terriblesue    
22 May 2014  #81

Slice in half in pieces, fry in a little oil until krispy on each side. Add a couple or more eggs and scramble together. That's how I've had it since I was a kid. I grew up in an all Polish family. Oh! take the skin off before frying.
kiszkaluvr    
22 Jun 2014  #82

Just eat it cold.
jimsmagnum    
14 Feb 2015  #83

I purchase my KISZKA from Andies deli in Chicago and have it shipped to me in Idaho.. The sausage is great and I really like how it is packaged and shipped, especially in the warmer months. My Polish families live in Omaha..Fry it uncased with chopped green onions..

Jim Sempek
Deb T    
3 Mar 2015  #84

From frozen state, cover the bottom of a pan with vegetable oil; bake 350F for 30-40 minutes. As the kiszka starts to soften poke one side with a large needle flip and poke again. This will prevent the kiszka from exploding. Your kiszka will be brown and crispy on the outside and moist and delicious on the inside.
Bill7777    
6 Nov 2015  #85

I like to cut off a piece about 4 inches long, slice it in half the long way, remove the skin, and fry it on high ( for about seven minutes). I flip it a few times and mash it up to get most of it crispy. I serve it on toast or a roll. I either put a slice of American cheese on it (while in the pan) or I put ketchup on it. Either way, it is delicious. I fail to see why people bake it for long periods of time. It is already cooked and just needs a few minutes to heat it up. I like it crispy, which is why I cook it on high. If you don't want it crispy, you could fry it on medium, covered, and it would be done in about 3 minutes. Grilling or boiling is not the way to cook Kiszka because it is made with liquids that will cause it to pretty much just fall apart when heated. Kiszka is a lot like pieces of meat and barley all mixed up with jello and stuffed in a sausage skin...........you wouldn't grill that and expect it to stay together, would you?
tomandbobby    
22 Mar 2016  #86

Sawa Market at Colorado Blvd. and Illif in Denver Coloradoa has Kishka and many other Polish Sausages and various Polish Products... Just google it for the actual address!
RSMBob    
24 May 2016  #87

Having grown up in Chicago with Polish ancestors, we would get kiszka and eat it raw (on crackers or on bread as a sandwich) or else my mom would fry some up in a pan for a few minutes. Normally it would come in a ring, but I still remember one time as a kid 40+ years ago we were at my great aunt's house and she brought one one warm from the market and it reminded me of a beating heart. I was a little afraid to eat it but I remember it being oh so good.
Jardinero 1 | 380    
25 May 2016  #88

Having grown up in Chicago with Polish ancestors, we would get kiszka and eat it raw

What the hell is this stuff, anyway - must be some regional thing? The name itself in Polish is enough to make one vomit - especially a vegetarian ;-)
jon357 55 | 10,796    
25 May 2016  #89

some regional thing

Yes, very much from the east. Nice in a stodgy way but not a big part of the diet here in Poland.
dmarse    
14 Jun 2016  #90

Cut in 4" pieces. Slash casing, microwave on a covered plate 2 minutes per 4" piece.



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