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Did someone say "Work in Poland"?


SevenSeaS  
24 Jul 2009 /  #1
Hi everyone :) First of all I want to tell that I've been reading polishforums for a long time (3 years-since my first trip to Poland) and I really find it useful. I'm from Turkey, I used to live in Saskatchewan in my childhood, had my Bachelor’s degree in Turkey and during that I had the chance to study in Poland with Erasmus. I also had an internship in Poland at a global firm. However after applying to 20-30 positions, I see no chance of being hired in Poland. I’m a recent graduate of finance, had internships at different well-known(one in Poland) companies, fluent in English and Turkish (also speak German and Polish altough not fluently). I’ve been working at an insurance company in Turkey for a while. Applying to many suitable vacant positions in Poland, nobody calls for an interview. I noticed that Poland has a great number of entry-level jobs but it seems that none of them is for non-EU citizens. I’m skilled in various accounting packages, SAP, MS Excel, etc and used to make a good earning from web design during my studies… Currently I am totally pessimistic about being hired in Poland, either full/ part time.
frd 7 | 1,399  
24 Jul 2009 /  #2
Doesn't internship work that way, if you are good they are just hiring you? Why didn't you stay in the company you had internship in? As for web design can't you still do it remotely from Poland?
prasz - | 5  
24 Jul 2009 /  #3
get a polish wife. That should let u work without hassles but I doubt if they will call you for interviews. Count yourself lucky if you can get work at McD's
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475  
24 Jul 2009 /  #4
I noticed that Poland has a great number of entry-level jobs but it seems that none of them is for non-EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the hassle required to get work permits for non-EU citizens means that unless you really bring something to the table, it's easier to simply hire an EU citizen instead. If you become fluent in Polish, then you may have more of a chance - but as it stands, your best bet would be to work for a multinational and then attempt a transfer to Poland.

The problem is that you're applying for entry-level jobs, along with everyone else. And why bother with the hassle of a non-EU citizen who doesn't speak Polish fluently when you can get a EU citizen (with a passport allowing him travel all over Europe with no fuss) who speaks fluent Polish and other languages too?
Tommy8  
24 Jul 2009 /  #5
Teach English it's a way to start better than no job but then again teaching is something you need to enjoy if you don't, it might seem like the worst job out there.

If you know English and Turkish there might be some companies that hire Customer Service reps. Other than that it’s hard to find a job in just English. You need to speak Polish and 20 % of that job might be in English but the rest in Polish. Maybe somebody here had luck that can further give you information.
OP SevenSeaS  
24 Jul 2009 /  #6
frd
I had to return to my country to graduate that's why I couldn't stay at that company, currently that company (which is in automotive sector) doesn't recruit due to the recession.

prasz
That's nonsense, I already have a rather good job here, I seek a job in Poland because I enjoyed living&working there, it's also close to Turkey&EU countries.

I think the main problem is EU work authorization. There are suitable bilingual jobs for me but they usually prefer to recruit someone who already has work authorization and don't bother to give a chance to a person who can make the difference. I had some phone interviews but then they got someone with Polish or German passport anyway.Well, thanks for the proper replies.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475  
24 Jul 2009 /  #7
I think the main problem is EU work authorization. There are suitable bilingual jobs for me but they usually prefer to recruit someone who already has work authorization and don't bother to give a chance to a person who can make the difference. I had some phone interviews but then they got someone with Polish or German passport anyway.Well, thanks for the proper replies.

Put yourself in their shoes and you'll understand why - the hassle with work pemits simply doesn't make it worthwhile to recruit a non-EU citizen for a job that can be filled by an EU citizen. If you were looking at a director-level position, you'd find that you would be considered equally - but for entry level jobs, there's so many graduates in Europe that it's simply not worthwhile.

It's not about 'bothering to give a chance' - it's all about the fact that you are much more hassle than an EU citizen.
OP SevenSeaS  
24 Jul 2009 /  #8
delphiandomine
Well, that'snot that much hassle, as I know from other people, it's just choosing the easy way... Anyway I just wanted to share my observation here, you don't have to agree with me and make so much generalized comments, moreover a company had already "hassled" for me last year, I was offered the job but I had to return. I'mnot really in need of a job in Poland but I am considering my options, I also think about going back to Saskatoon where I don't have any legal status problems but I consider Poland for the short-term because of the distance to my home.

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