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praca magisterska (master's degree) - any impact on career in Poland


irishborn 1 | 9  
23 Sep 2008 /  #1
for a pole who didn't achieve their praca magisterska, how (if at all) will this affect their career and life prospects?

I ask as i know something about poland and i know someone who didn't get, so i'd like to know a bit more about what will come next

thanks
loco polaco 3 | 353  
23 Sep 2008 /  #2
it surely depends what they are into, no? it could have hardly any effect or it could mean death to their career.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163  
23 Sep 2008 /  #3
for a pole who didn't achieve their praca magisterska, how (if at all) will this affect their career and life prospects?

Well, he/she just won't have a master degree and how will affect his/her career ? Some people are billioners without any degree, some other with a degree aren't even making avg salary but It's definately better to have It.
clouddancer - | 25  
23 Sep 2008 /  #4
how (if at all) will this affect their career and life prospects?

Oh I don't know, they might get elected president for example :D en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksander_Kwa%C5%9Bniewski#Degree
OP irishborn 1 | 9  
24 Sep 2008 /  #5
seriously
she studied english "filology"
and doesn't have her praca magisterska
her parents are STRICT
will this harm her chances working in this field?
or any field for that matter?
Magdalena 3 | 1,837  
24 Sep 2008 /  #6
If you study to get your degree, and then don't get it, chances are you will have some problems getting a good job in your field, but you can usually - not always - overcome those with hard work and dedication. E.g. as far as I know all teachers are now required to either hold at least a B.A. or study for it. On the other hand I had a wonderful teacher at University who had no degree at all and taught translation - but he was a very good practising translator at the time. So it really does depend on the circs. What exactly would the person in question want to do with her life? And can't she make the effort to write her thesis after all? Because if she has her "absolutorium" - all exams passed, all credits obtained, no master thesis - she can do the thesis part later, she just needs to let the Uni know.
Switezianka - | 463  
24 Sep 2008 /  #7
I'm still studying that thing (so I've got no masters yet) and I earn quite a lot on translations - so for that no masters is needed. You just have do be good at this.

If she hasn't got licencjat (going the 'old' system), I think she should write her masters. In this case she's still got only secondary education and it doesn't look too good on your CV. I've seen a lot of job ads with 'higher education required' but not a specific one - you just have to have any higher education. If she wants to be a teacher at school (which most English Philology graduates get), she must have higher education.

So, if she's got licencjat, it's OK, but if she hasn't, it would be better to write her masters and have the 'higher education' paper.
Ewcinka - | 27  
24 Sep 2008 /  #8
praca magisterska... I still need some 6 or 8 pages ... and I have only 2 days left... wish me luck...
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163  
24 Sep 2008 /  #9
wish me luck...

Good luck.
Michal2 - | 78  
25 Sep 2008 /  #10
t achieve their praca magisterska, how (if at all) will this affect their career and life prospects?

None whatsoever. Most Polish qualifications are not recognized in the West except for Kraków University and the Politechnic of Waszawa. In England there are loads of so called educated Poles who are sweeping the streets.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837  
25 Sep 2008 /  #11
Most Polish qualifications are not recognized in the Wes

Not true.
Also kindly consider the possibility that the person in question is actually living in Poland.
OP irishborn 1 | 9  
26 Sep 2008 /  #12
she's thankfully not living in england - fuj
she's living in beautiful poland

good luck ewcinka

thanks for all the help guys

pa pa
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
26 Sep 2008 /  #13
Most Polish qualifications are not recognized in the West except for Kraków University and the Politechnic of Waszawa.

I studied in Wroclaw and Zielona Gora. I was admitted to Vanderbilt (personal invitation of the then Chair of the English Department). I was also admitted to a Canadian University solely based on my Polish academic curriculum. In a way you are right though. I didn't have my M.A. then. I was a 3rd year student of English in Wroclaw.

When I studied computer science in Canada, two of my profs were Poles, with very thick accent actually. One was from U of Warsaw, the other from Silesian University. Both highly regarded, and both taught the toughest of the courses and were the most demanding among the staff.

A friend of mine (U of Wroclaw) was admitted to doctoral studies at Fordham University. He teaches English lit. at UCLA.

Another buddy of mine (U of Wroclaw) didn't suffer any rejections because of his M.A. being from a Polish university.

I also knew two American citizens who studied medicine in the Wroclaw Medical Academy. One is a family doctor in L.A., CA, the other is a surgeon in Chicago, IL.

There is more, but that would reveal too much about myself.

In England there are loads of so called educated Poles who are sweeping the streets.

Interesting.
This friend of mine (M.A. from U of Warsaw) teaches advanced topic in Japanese language semmantics in a British University.

In other words, irishborn, go ahead. Poland's academic standards may vary, but based on what I read from Michal, they are much higher than what he experienced in Moscow.

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