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POLISH SUICIDES IN THE UK


wildrover 98 | 4,451  
12 Feb 2009 /  #1
polskieradio/thenews/human-interest/?id=102217 Rising Polish suicides in UK
From Polish news..

Created: 12.02.2009 11:58
According to Poland's Deputy Consul in Manchester, suicides committed in north England and Wales constitute one third of Polish deaths in Great Britain.

The rate is even higher in southern England, where industry is less developed and there are fewer job opportunities for unskilled or semi-skilled Poles.

The case of 22-year-old Pawal Lipinski, who killed himself last year in Bradford, northern England, is one of a growing trend of suicides, says the organization.

Psychologists say loneliness, lack of money and shame of not getting a proper job or not making enough money are to blame for an increasing amount of Poles feeling trapped in the UK with no prospects.

In the UK, men born between 1978 and 1984 are most likely to take their own lives. (is)

OP wildrover 98 | 4,451  
12 Feb 2009 /  #3
I think the pressure to succeed is very great , and those that don,t make it seem ashamed to admit defeat and go back home....I think too many Poles set off for the UK with geat visions of how wonderfull life is there , and don,t have a backup plan if things don,t work out....
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
12 Feb 2009 /  #4
Spot on, wildrover. You've hit the nail right on the head with that one. Some don't even have enough for the airfare home.
sapphire 22 | 1,241  
12 Feb 2009 /  #5
its all about keeping up appearances isnt it. They wont admit to family and even close friends that things are not working out as planned. It seems crazy not to be able to confide in those closest to you that all is not well, but that appears to be the case for many Poles working overseas...and the end result is loneliness, depression and in some cases.. this.

Surely this should be a wake up call for people to realise that a problem shared is a problem halved and it is not a crime to admit defeat. Im sure their families would rather have them alive and skint, than this situation. RIP.
MrBubbles 10 | 614  
12 Feb 2009 /  #6
Surely this should be a wake up call for people to realise that a problem shared is a problem halved and it is not a crime to admit defeat.

Agreed. It should also be a wake up call to Poles who think that they just have to come to the uk and offer to work for less than everyone else. Everyone needs skill these days.
Mister H 11 | 761  
12 Feb 2009 /  #7
Rising Polish suicides in UK From Polish news..

Do you have a link for this ?

It's a bad state of affairs indeed for people to get so low that they see no way out other than suicide.

For all the talk of the benefit system being milked by the Polish and others, it's a great shame that there seemed to be no one there from the "system" to help people in their darkest hour.

It's fine to sign-on the dole and get dagger looks from the British, but don't expect any real help when it all unravels and you want to stick your head in the gas oven.

The way we, the British, "help" people is so ass-about-face at times.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
12 Feb 2009 /  #8
there seemed to be no one there from the "system" to help people in their darkest hour.

The man doesn't have a human face.

Every suicide is a tragedy. I can't imagine how lonely someone could feel with no money, no job and no family close by, not even being able to afford the fare home. Suicide rates are highest amongst young men who are some of the least likely people to confide in family and close ones when times are difficult.
szarlotka 8 | 2,208  
12 Feb 2009 /  #9
The way we, the British, "help" people is so ass-about-face at times.

An element of truth here. As a counter argument I guess you have to know to be able to help sometimes. There are channels for talking to people, Samaritans etc. I know it is more difficult to a visitor to know of where to turn. GPs are an obvious place but again there are reasons why migrants may not be able to go there either. In the absence of any form of outreaching then it relies upon a sympathetic person to spot someone in trouble. I'm sure most of us would try to help if we knew. The one person I knew that took this step looked and behaved outwardly the same.
Calicoe 2 | 133  
12 Feb 2009 /  #10
This thread makes me really sad. All I can say is that bad times are just temporary. When you get past it, you will look back and think that if you gave up, you wouldn't experience the good times that are sure to come again.
OP wildrover 98 | 4,451  
12 Feb 2009 /  #11
There is a Polish organisation working in the UK and Poland to rescue those that have fallen on hard times and get em back home.....I spoke to them not so long ago , but right at this moment i can,t remember the name of the organisation....
Mister H 11 | 761  
12 Feb 2009 /  #12
An element of truth here. As a counter argument I guess you have to know to be able to help sometimes. There are channels for talking to people, Samaritans etc. I know it is more difficult to a visitor to know of where to turn.

Yes, there are many fantastic organisations out there that can help, if people know of there existence and can access them fairly easily. The Samaritans are just one example that could help assuming there isn't too much of a language barrier.

My general point was that however much people see the welfare state in Britian as over-generous and too easy to exploit, the help is purely financial. Beyond that, you're pretty much on your own.

Suicide rates are highest amongst young men who are some of the least likely people to confide in family and close ones when times are difficult.

I fear that there are many, many people out there carrying around their various sacks of misery. To have to lug it along familiar streets is bad enough, but to do it so far from home, it must feel ten times as heavy.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
12 Feb 2009 /  #13
Unfortunately, it's often a case of 'out of the frying pan and into the fire'. They escape what they see as domestic turmoil in Poland and replace it with a maelstrom of other complications in the UK.

Being stuck between a rock and a hard place presses you :( RIP
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498  
12 Feb 2009 /  #14
Fom the link the message is a bit unclear.
If the consul is saying that suicide is the third largest cause of death amongst Poles, this may actually be less than some population groups, where suicide is the main cause of death in those under 35.

It would be good if the figures stated could be referenced, particulary the statement that being born in the years 1978-1984 predisposes a person.

Some more useful info here

Choose Life
George8600 10 | 636  
20 Feb 2009 /  #15
Sigh I wish they wouldn't. WHy? They're the nicest people. If only I was there before they did it to stop them. Show them someone cares, give them care (even money if I could)....sigh.
sueswalkies 2 | 32  
20 Feb 2009 /  #16
i think part of the problem is the the high hopes the young poles have before comming here to uk. I know that the stories my sisters in laws have told to the villagers back home has every one of them thinking we are all millionares and that the steets are paved with gold. So they think that the answer to all there problems is to get over here and get a bit of the money that we have growing on the money trees over here.
Mister H 11 | 761  
20 Feb 2009 /  #17
I know that the stories my sisters in laws have told to the villagers back home has every one of them thinking we are all millionares and that the steets are paved with gold.

Why motive do they have for saying that though ?
welshguyinpola 23 | 463  
20 Feb 2009 /  #18
The way we, the British, "help" people is so ass-about-face at times.

Another one with a negative view of UK. Firstly, as said above, how can this person be helped if noone knows anything is wrong. Secondly, to commit suicide someone must be at their witts end, no amount of help would have stopped him.

Thirdly, there was always the option of returning back to Poland.

I heard that alot of these suicide cases amongst Poles and other ethnic minorities is that they get into debts with loan sharks and cant pay it back. Suicide is the easiest way out
Mister H 11 | 761  
20 Feb 2009 /  #19
Another one with a negative view of UK.

It's just my point of view and I'm British and I live here, so I think I'm qualified to have a view.

Thirdly, there was always the option of returning back to Poland.

I agree that is the case, but many don't for various reasons.

I heard that alot of these suicide cases amongst Poles and other ethnic minorities is that they get into debts with loan sharks and cant pay it back.

I think many are in debt to ordinary High Street banks, that they probably thought wouldn't screw them over.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463  
20 Feb 2009 /  #20
I think many are in debt to ordinary High Street banks, that they probably thought wouldn't screw them over.

Alot cant get loans from banks so they go to the loan sharks as they ask no questions. They dont relaise that these guys will hound them relentlessly until they get their money back
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498  
21 Feb 2009 /  #21
Secondly, to commit suicide someone must be at their witts end, no amount of help would have stopped him.

This is not true. The link is to Suicide "First Aid" information -

asist.org.uk

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