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Poland to make cuts amid gloomy economic forecasts


Prince 15 | 590  
30 Jan 2009 /  #1
topnews.in/poland-make-cuts-amid-gloomy-economic-forecasts-2117893

Warsaw - Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk was to meet with his cabinet ministers Friday on slashing government spending, amid forecasts of slowing economic growth

But Tusk on Tuesday said the country's GDP could grow by as little as 1.7 per cent in 2009, while inflation could be up 1.9 per cent, PAP reported.

Expenses like investments, vehicle purchases and building renovations would all be looked over to make cuts and compensate for what could be lower revenues in 2009, Tusk said

mazzastaffordsh 2 | 68  
1 Feb 2009 /  #2
Job losses here in the UK are growing and there are already various sympathetic strikers. It is likely to get worse as many more companies are choosing to employ workers from Spain, Portugal, Italy etc. Many Polish workers may be thinking of leaving the UK as our cost of living is high whilst European workers are paid less and foreign owned companies in the UK are discriminating against the British worker. British workers do have for some reason a reputation of being lazy but for the people that I know in particular the engineering industries are very hard workers.

Is Poland's economy going to follow the same pattern?

Latest news from Staffordshire in the UK. Local engineering company in Stoke on Trent have cut everyones wages by 20% and overtime will not be paid, just time off in lieu of wages.

Be warned out there it could be coming your way!
szkotja2007 27 | 1,499  
21 Feb 2009 /  #3
Just been speaking to a mate that has had his work increased, more hours - same pay.

Went to the boss to complain and was told....go complain to the eight guys I just paid off !

Hard times ahead......
mazzastaffordsh 2 | 68  
21 Feb 2009 /  #4
Seems like the gloom is on it's way. There are thousands over here losing their homes as well as their jobs. I think that there has been too much money given to footballers, celebrities and high flying money managers and they have taken so much that there is not much left for the ordinary man in the street. Surely a few bad debts in the housing market of the USA could not have caused such a downturn in the global economy. I think governments think we are stupid. What do we vote for in the next election in the UK more of the same or a conservative party that have no ideas what to do? Maybe if everyone refused to vote they may think "dooh what have we done"? Then maybe not do politicians actually think?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
21 Feb 2009 /  #5
Gloomy forecasts, yes, but Poland's best bet is its belief.

Please watch the following,



this is interesting too. Katołice, LOL. The views of foreigners on Poles.
mazzastaffordsh 2 | 68  
22 Feb 2009 /  #6
Hi Seanus have checked out the links and have to agree Poland is beautiful and a great country full of very nice people. Yes I would like to live there but have to say that home is where the heart is and that is the UK but my second choice would be Poland the land of my father.

I think somehow the UK has got lost and we certainly need some very forward thinking politicians who are not just working to line their own pockets, but to bring the very best ideas and to work with the people and for the people. The greatest asset any country has is its people and governments should be judged on how they treat its people. At the moment that is not very well at all. We can no longer just sit back and let the wealthy do just as they please. That wealth needs to be put back into circulation and get the UK moving again. Maybe we need some of that confidence that the Poles have who knows? I for one hope that sometime soon things settle down and in the mean time we just work hard, get paid less money, try to keep a hold on our homes and maybe things will work out ok.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
22 Feb 2009 /  #7
You wonder how work contracts are affected. Under Employment Law, it is technically illegal to lower salaries in such a fashion. Bankers have to realise that they didn't put the brakes on and actually encouraged loans. The magazines did their part to encourage overspending.

Unless I have my blinkers on, Poland is a huge credit nation. Their sums just don't add up so I'm quite sure of it. There have been hysterical reactions to the financial crisis here but it has real applicability. Therefore, hard times lie ahead.
mazzastaffordsh 2 | 68  
22 Feb 2009 /  #8
Apparently work contracts don't really count for anything, companies just go to court with their plans and state that any change is good for the company (including pay cuts) and the plan will be approved. Such is life, stuff the workers, give plenty of benefits to the shirkers and the bankers say great.......more money for me.

Contracts what is the point!!!!

The truth about greedy bankers is now coming out. Greedy men at the top have secured themselves fantastic amounts of money for their own pensions and the workforce will get next to nothing. I just wonder why the great workforce who toil in factories etc are really presumed to be worthless even though it is they that produce the goods for companies and make the profits very lucrative. Do executives think they are clever taking all these bonuses? Eventually the money will run out - these executives should get down onto the factory floor and learn about manufacturing and they may have a greater respect for the hard working labour force because at the moment ordinary men and women are treated like scum. What will be left for the younger generation? Hm, let me think, shops, shops and more shops because that is what England is becoming, but many will only be able to look through the windows at what they can't have. Seems like the return of the post war years to me, my grandmother told me a lot about those times.
moonlight 6 | 103  
1 Mar 2009 /  #9
Here in Ireland the government announced it was going to introduce pay cuts for public sector employees, of course unions sought legal advice but it seems it can be done.

But government have thought of a different way to reduce wages...a pension levy!!!!
most people have no problem doing their part why should ordinary people have to pay for the mistakes of a Government who had no vision, greedy bankers(could replace with better word) and corrupt business men!

while the outlook is not good, people need to stay positive and support each other. I have heard too many stories of people ending their lives over this.

really my point is dont let this doom and gloom consume you, times will change eventually.
Ireland32 2 | 172  
1 Mar 2009 /  #10
Thought Id add a comment on this post......Im a Senior Manager at a company in Ireland. All the SMT have been asked to take a 20% pay cut at end of this week for next 5 months.......no one is ammune to the big 'R'.......only this time there aint no coffin ships heading for the shores of America !!
mazzastaffordsh 2 | 68  
1 Mar 2009 /  #11
The ordinary working mans redundancy package is certainly no where as big as what some Senior Managers get. You have not answered my question though, why do the people on the factory floor get treated as though they are scum? Please don't tell me that they don't because I have personal experiences. When you have your large executive houses and are made redundant yes it is difficult but you can at least downsize. The family in a smaller less well off situation can only downsize to maybe a caravan, council or housing association property, and have probably had to go into bankruptcy.Also my husband has had a 20% pay cut and is expected to work overtime with no overtime premium. There is a huge problem in the business sector and that is Management seem to think that they are superior beings and the people getting their hands dirty are worth less. Maybe Ireland32 you may not be one of these superior beings as I do not know you and can only speak as I have found through experience.

Seems like Mr Brown (who is he you might ask) our unelected Prime Minister and Mr Obama have got a plan to save the world. Pity he didn't know about the plan months ago then the UK in particular could be in a better financial state instead of the mess we have got now.How can it be that a democratic country like the UK has an unelected Prime Minister?
Ireland32 2 | 172  
4 Mar 2009 /  #12
Maybe Ireland32 you may not be one of these superior beings as I do not know you and can only speak as I have found through experience.

I may be a Senior Manager but believe me 20% is alot. I am also losing 3 of my staff so yes that means more work for me and as a Senior Manager I do not get overtime. I already work 55 hours a week. Im not looking for sympathy but I do have sympathy for those people on the factory floor. They have families and homes.....I know that. I am divorced. I have children who I love and adore. I rent a 2 bedroom apartment. I gave up my family home to my kids. Times are hard. No one is immune but you can rest asssure that the governments who helped the banks will not come to help me or you when the balliffs come knocking on our doors.
Randal 1 | 577  
4 Mar 2009 /  #13
A big part of the problem are labor union contracts which for years have been crafted and bullied through with blind disregard for economic realities.

Can unions really think that their absurdly generous contacts will be respected the same during these tough economic times as when things were good?
Here in the States they are demanding so called “no layoff” clauses. During these times? Gimme a break. They need to wake up to the reality of the current situation.

Every union contact should include language tying it to the fluctuating economy.
mazzastaffordsh 2 | 68  
4 Mar 2009 /  #14
Hello Ireland32 thanks for your reply.You obviously are having it tough and care for your family very much. There is though a great divide between the "factory floor". For example where my husband works they have stopped any overtime payment, they do not have a company pension scheme at all so we have to pay privately - I think you would agree that this is very expensive and we could never put away the amount that would keep us in a high standard of living on retirement. Also no work no pay and that means if you are too ill to work (meaning hospitalized and not just shirking). The management organized a 3 shift system and it is running to the minimum of breaks ie the men have to leave their machines when the buzzer goes, go to wash hands and toilet, eat their meal and be back on the machines, for this they have 20 minutes. There has been a few people having heart attacks and other health issues because of the 3 shift system. Also people have to keep rearranging child care where the wives work. Maybe senior management could come together with the factory floor, hear each other out and maybe a better quality or work arrangements could be met. I firmly believe that the children of today are missing out on quality family life and maybe more attention to our children would do so much more good and less hooliganism and disrespect might be the result.

To Randal I would say that Unions are not all that bad in today's climate. There are other advantages of belonging to a union.Fistly members are insured on their way to work and home again - this must be good. Secondly where my husband works there has been cases of bullying by supervisors (proved cases not made up). Thirdly when there are reduncies the union is a great help to get people into training - again this has been proved to be good as we know someone who has had training in plastering and has done really well, he is now in employment. The union where my husband works haveally good job and they have not called out strikes or huge pay demands they have acted reasonably within structures that management require. Good result

Have just heard of a winner in the redundancy situation. Engineer my husband knows was made redundant after a lot of years in the industry. He got around 13k redundancy and was immediately snapped up by another engineering company (his reputation for good work had gone before him) and the old company have got to pay him his wages for 12 weeks as well. To this man I say Best of Luck you deserve it.
peterweg 37 | 2,321  
12 Mar 2009 /  #15
eems like Mr Brown (who is he you might ask) our unelected Prime Minister and Mr Obama have got a plan to save the world. Pity he didn't know about the plan months ago then the UK in particular could be in a better financial state instead of the mess we have got now.How can it be that a democratic country like the UK has an unelected Prime Minister?

You obviously don't know anything about the UK's democratic system.We don't elect Prime Ministers, never have, never will.

We elect MP's who select their leader. Simple.
Polanglik 11 | 303  
13 Mar 2009 /  #16
We elect MP's who select their leader. Simple

true ... in UK one votes for a particular party who has a leader, and that person will become Prime Minister if that party wins the election.

I think the point mazzstaffordsh is trying to make is that when the UK people voted Labour in the last election , they were voting for Tony Blair & not Gordon Brown. If I remember correctly, and I'm sure someone will put me right if I'm wrong, Tony Blair said he would see out the full term as Prime Minister if Labour were to win that election. :o))

The UK people were voting for Tony Blair to be their Prime Minister ..... had Gordon Brown been leader of the party would the same people have voted Labour ?
ragtime27 1 | 146  
13 Mar 2009 /  #17
I'm sure someone will put me right if I'm wrong

You're right,however poeple vote for different reasons

vote for their MP's(local issues for example).
you can do that in by elections,but voters can use general election for that as well.

Parties create shadow government(largest opposition),so voters can cast their vote for that.
if you can't stand a politician and he's going to be in the government it may put you off voting for that party.

I personally happy with Gordon Brown,remember main reason Labour stayed in power is the economy performance(GB was behind that).
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
13 Mar 2009 /  #18
What is the unemployment rate in the UK, the U.S.A and Ireland?.

silobreaker.com/DocumentReader.aspx?Item=5_2262128766576754715

Poland's January 2009 unemployment rate rises to 10.5%
pgtx 30 | 3,158  
13 Mar 2009 /  #19
the U.S.A

8.1 %
Randal 1 | 577  
13 Mar 2009 /  #20
What is the unemployment rate in the UK, the U.S.A

Right now we’re at 8.1% but they’re projecting 10% by the end of the year.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
13 Mar 2009 /  #21
Does that 8.1% figure include illegal immigrants.

I know it is impossible to say accurately but because of the huge amount of illegals in the U.S, it is a factor.
ragtime27 1 | 146  
13 Mar 2009 /  #22
for UK 6.3% nearly 2 million
niejestemcapita 2 | 561  
13 Mar 2009 /  #23
What is the unemployment rate in the UK,

8.1 %

10%

arent these figures just kind of arbritary and massaged down by various gov't schemes of either finding ways of pushing ppl off lists or onto other lists?
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
13 Mar 2009 /  #24
Ireland's unemployment rate is expected to rise to 6.6 percent next year from 5.5 percent in 2008.

I know unemployed people can claim benifits from the government in the U.K. and Ireland but what about the U.S.

I am also not clear on the benefit system in Poland, does anybody know.
I think it has changed recently?.

The price of living here in Poland is very high compared with Ireland, the U.S?. and the U.K.
Many things are the same price as Ireland/U.K but the wages here (in Poland) are significantly lower.
Accommodation (depending), Kitchen utilities (cookers, refrigerators etc...) are the same price, which is madness.
Vegetables are cheaper.

It would be interesting to do a price check.
We could compare average prices of things in our respective countries.

arent these figures just kind of arbritary and massaged down by various gov't schemes of either finding ways of pushing ppl off lists or onto other lists?

I know what you mean but we have to work with something but you raise a good point.
ragtime27 1 | 146  
13 Mar 2009 /  #25
arent these figures just kind of arbritary and massaged down by various gov't schemes

Hmmm.... I don't think Government need to temper with the data.

Non-governmental institute can give you the numbers
Randal 1 | 577  
13 Mar 2009 /  #26
arent these figures just kind of arbritary and massaged down by various gov't schemes of either finding ways of pushing ppl off lists or onto other lists?

Yes, we use a very complicated and convoluted calculation to determine the number of unemployed people. It involves comparing the average number of the past month with the previous month and somehow they arrive at an estimate. But people who have exhausted their unemployment benefits no longer get counted. It compares the working rolls so the lazy, terminally unemployed don’t get counted. I don’t know that it includes illegals but it certainly could. I don’t fully understand it and I’m not sure many people do. Seems to me it is needlessly and perhaps intentionally confusing. But that's the number we use.
Jimbo Jones - | 3  
13 Mar 2009 /  #27
What is the unemployment rate in the UK, the U.S.A and Ireland?.

The numbers they publish are inaccurate. The government is lying to you. Doesn't matter the party, doesn't matter the president or prime minister.

tampabay.com/news/article473596.ece

The political blame for the slow, piecemeal distortion is bipartisan - both Democratic and Republican administrations had a hand in the abetting of political dishonesty, reckless debt and a casino-like financial sector. To see how, we must revisit 40 years of economic and statistical dissembling.

Transparency is the hallmark of democracy, but we now find ourselves with economic statistics every bit as opaque - and as vulnerable to double-dealing - as a subprime CDO.

Second is the Gross Domestic Product, which in itself represents something of a fudge: Federal economists used the Gross National Product until 1991, when rising U.S. international debt costs made the narrower GDP assessment more palatable. The GDP has been subject to many further fiddles, the most manipulatable of which are the adjustments made for the presumed starting up and ending of businesses (the "birth/death of businesses" equation) and the amounts that the Bureau of Economic Analysis "imputes" to nationwide personal income data (known as phantom income boosters, or imputations; for example, the imputed income from living in one's own home, or the benefit one receives from a free checking account, or the value of employer-paid health- and life-insurance premiums).

The Bank of England has already begun to print money. The Fed might have to follow suit. Add Obama's multi-trillion "stimulus" to the mix and there looks to be an inflationary monster 18 to 36 months out.

All I know is I'm steering clear of cash, bonds, and most equities. I'll get into energy ETF's and commodity currencies. Your strategies may vary.
mazzastaffordsh 2 | 68  
13 Mar 2009 /  #28
Thanks Polanglik you have explained the point that I was trying to make in a much better way. Tony Blair dropped out of government at a most strategic point I think, he timed it so well for himself and just handed Gordon Brown the job. Now then in a normal work situation any job vacancy is usually advertised and people apply for that position. In this case it didn't happen. Tony handed over to Gordon. When the next election comes round it is going to be so difficult for me to vote because I cannot see that any of the parties have clear policies for the people to vote on at the moment. Voting Liberal is a wasted vote, voting Conservative because Labour has made a hash of things would make them think that they had got in by a huge majority (if we all did this of course). In fact voting Conservative would really have been a protest vote against Labour and not because the Conservatives were the best choice. I haven't seen any Politician taking a 20% pay cut like many ordinary workers are doing.

On a lighter note did anyone see the 21 year old girl who won £250,000 on Deal or No Deal last night (UK game show) well I say great hope she manages to find somewhere safe to invest it maybe not a UK Bank.
Wroclaw Boy  
13 Mar 2009 /  #29
Poland to make cuts amid gloomy economic forecasts

Yep afriad so, by wifes brother is laying off four people this month.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
13 Mar 2009 /  #30
Hmmm.... I don't think Government need to temper with the data.

Figures are "fudged"

The UK people were voting for Tony Blair to be their Prime Minister ..... had Gordon Brown been leader of the party would the same people have voted Labour ?

No - he's a bloody fool! and just to be clear I didn't vote the other bloody fool in either!
______________________________________________________________________ ____

Regarding the unemployment figures - I'd double what they have and add a few more 100 thousand! They have learnt over the years how to manipulate these figures, when the miners lost their jobs, they were "advised" to sign on sick rather than to sign on unemployed - firstly they would receive more money and secondly they are not on the national statistics for unemployment figures. This trend has continued over the years to mask the real problem in this country. It's only now we can see on the news that 2,000 hear and 10,000 there have lost there jobs people start to think.

article.wn.com/view/2009/03/01/Hungary_warns_of_new_economic_Iron_Curtain_f8/

The above peeves me, why should other member states who have already had large handouts be given more?

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