Return PolishForums LIVE
  PolishForums Archive :
Archives - 2005-2009 / Life  % width 21

The School Year in Polish Schools


Anja  
22 Nov 2006 /  #1
School year in Poland starts on the 1st of September and ends on first Friday after the 18th of June. It lasts ten months and is separated into two terms by winter break, with two holiday breaks for Christmas and Easter. This year, however, new school year started on the 4th of September, which was on Monday, and many pupils were happy because they had one more weekend “free.”

Schooling system in Poland has undergone many changes since 1989 political transformation. In autumn 1999, a new reform was introduced. At present children start attending school when they are seven, but it is also obligatory for six-year-olds to attend so called “0” class (“zerówka”:), which can be either formed as a part of kindergarten or in primary school. In the “0” class kids get accustomed with learning, acquire basic knowledge in writing and counting, music, religion etc. but are not marked and their learning resembles fun rather than any serious schooling. A new project is being prepared for the act imposing an obligation for children to start their school education as early as at 6th year of age, but that is still being worked on; there are as many supporters as opponents for this idea. The later state that psychological and emotional development of a six year old is not the one which allows him or her to attend regular classes in school to a child’s full advantage and that the loss resulting from such an experiment might be bigger than any benefit expected.

The new idea supporters claim that the change is necessary in our rapidly growing and technologically changing society and thus it gives a child benefit to start earlier on with his / her education and to stand up to the requirements and challenges of the modern, united European market.

But as for the time being, children start primary school when they are seven. Primary school consists of 6 grades; then children have to set an exam enabling them to attend secondary school which lasts for 3 years. These 9 years of schooling are obligatory in Poland. After secondary school a child might choose a high school (college). Education here takes next 3 years and is finished with Polish “matura”, A-level exams which enable a person to seek academic education. After graduation young people might choose among universities or academies of various kinds.

The public opinion on Polish reformed educational system is divided, but since the nostalgic autumn approaches I would rather not go into discussing the subject in details. What I remember from my childhood in Cracow is that I would very impatiently be looking forward to the beginning of each school year, to choosing new notebooks, pencils, pens and newly printed, smelling with ink, books; to meeting with my school mates and exchanging our holiday stories. Everything seemed to be so simple and organized in a world ruled by the course of school days, breaks, class- tests and our school teacher “preaching”. I am sure that in this respect nothing has really changed and Polish pupils, regardless of any kind of reform whatsoever, still look forward to the ceremony of the first school day. They will gather solemnly dressed in a school gym and meet their friends and teachers and everything will start all over again.

September in Poland makes us all think about two important things: one is the beginning of World War II and the other the beginning of a new school year. Both are linked by one date. The first event, although remembered, remains in history, the other repeats itself every year and brings about the atmosphere of anticipation filled with a scent of fresh apples, ink, freshly redecorated classrooms and the feel of already cool mornings and a sound of an alarm clock waking you up for a new school day.

Anja
krysia 23 | 3,057  
22 Nov 2006 /  #2
In US first grade starts at age 6. Kindergarten at age 5. Pre-school at 3 or 4.
My daughter goes to kindergarten. She starts at 9:AM till 3:30 PM. She's there all day. I think it's too long for a 5-year old to be in school all day. This also was recently changed from being half-day in kindergarten, to full day.
makie  
10 Dec 2006 /  #3
whats the school fees like for Pre-school ( fully english medium of instructions) , my son is 4 years ??
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384  
10 Dec 2006 /  #4
makie,

As a guide, I can only tell you that ordinary private school in Wroclaw costs around 550 / 650 Zł per month. Payment is also due during holidays.

You will find that most schools have web-sites, so you should be able to check.

I assume that you are looking in Warsaw. Yes/No ?
matter  
6 Jan 2007 /  #5
I don't like going to school - no matter in Poland or somewhere else.
Eurola 4 | 1,909  
6 Jan 2007 /  #6
So, how do you intend to earn your living? Flipping burgers? That's what a parent in the US would say to kid...
School is very important. High education is not wanted by all nor needed. There can be only so many lawyers, CEO's, accountants and other pencil pushers..pardon me..mouse pushers. You can always go to school and learn a trade. We need new roads, new buildings, which need plumbing, electricity, painting, heating and air-conditioning, you name it.

Your statement make me think that you are still young and have some time to think about it. Some people are earning their dgrees in 50-ties or 60-ties because they had no opportunities earlier. If you have it - take it.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702  
7 Jan 2007 /  #7
Schooling is compulsory for all English children from the age of 5 to 16. The academic year in England runs from September to July and is divided into 3 terms:

Autumn Term: from the beginning of September to mid-December.

Spring Term: from the beginning of January to mid/late March (depending on the dates of Easter)

Summer Term: from early/mid April to mid July.

Each term is divided by a one-week break called half term, usually at the end of October, mid-February and the end of May.

Most schools also have 6th Forms - 16 to 18 (most decide to stay on for A Levels)

Uni - 18 to 21 (probably 40 per cent will go to Uni) and then there's your masters degree...blimy nearly 20 years at school before you finish!

So when if you think about it the average brit spends 13 years in School...
Ranj 21 | 948  
10 Apr 2007 /  #8
Today, 10:25 - Attached on merging:
The Polish School Year?

Thought I would add something outside of the Off Topic Thread, and this is what came to mind. Right now, schools here have students coming back from Spring Break Vacation/Holiday......My question is "What is the Polish School year like?" In the U.S. most school years begin in the Fall and end in the Spring (Sept. to May) with summers off. There are some that continue year round (Classes for 9 weeks, off for 3 weeks). Just wondered what the average school year is like in Poland?
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161  
10 Apr 2007 /  #9
1st September to ~22th June.
Ranj 21 | 948  
10 Apr 2007 /  #10
Thanks, G. I assume there are several vacation/holidays taken off during that time?
Karima 3 | 50  
10 Apr 2007 /  #11
I don't like going to school - no matter in Poland or somewhere else.

very wise words
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161  
10 Apr 2007 /  #12
Thanks, G. I assume there are several vacation/holidays taken off during that time?

2 weeks in late Jan/early Feb + Christmas/New year + national holidays.
CrapCakes  
29 Feb 2008 /  #13
Quoting: matter, Post #5
I don't like going to school - no matter in Poland or somewhere else.

High education is not wanted by all nor needed. There can be only so many lawyers, CEO's...You can always go to school and learn a trade. We need new roads, new buildings, which need plumbing, electricity, painting, heating and air-conditioning, you name it.

This sounds like fine advice to give somebody that is confused about the work and determination required to finish school. No sense in building up a young person's hope with those fancy smancy careers like law and business. Instead, let's just shoot for trade jobs, so that you will always have somebody to perform the work you feel is degrading.

How about a different approach? Say Billy, why don't you stay in school, get good grades, and apply yourself? Do you have any aspirations in life? No. Then you will certainly spend the rest of your life thinking that you could achieve greatness, while you’re breaking your back 60 hours a week building houses. If you work really hard and pay your taxes, you will help support privileged people like myself, which have spent a very very good life living off of the middle class!

Go get em tiger!
Guest  
17 Apr 2008 /  #14
wow, thats a lot of school
EmmaLee  
5 May 2008 /  #15
I'm 16 right now and live in Alaska, in the USA, and I'm going on Foreign Exchange to Poland next year, so I thought I'd get some idea of how long I'd be there in school....

When I was 6, I was in Kindergarten, and I never went to Pre-School. I turned 7 in Kindergarten, actually... I was only 2 months too young to be a grade higher... and my Elementary/Primary school lasts from Kindergarten to 6th grade, which is really the 7th year of school.

Middle/Junior High school is from 7th to 8th, tho about 30 years ago they were 7th through 9th. Some I think still are in various parts of the US.

High School/Secondary school lasts from 9th to 12th, or some 10th - 12th, and then you are a graduate. School is mandatory for anyone 16 years old and under.

After high school, here at least, you can just work for the rest of your life if you want, not going to any more school for anything, but those jobs aren't really all that good. There are trade schools to go to(some that even pay for you to be there), or Colleges/Universities to go to if you want a higher paying job and a better adult lifestyle. Everyone has equal opportunities to go, because scholarships are available for those who are really good at some things or who are waaay too poor to pay their way but who are smart enough to get in to colleges.

That's the jist, shortened version, of the school system in my part of America, at least....
Guest  
13 May 2008 /  #16
I'm currently doing some research, but I can't find out if the schools in Poland are co-ed or not. can someone tell me if there are strictly girls schools and strictly boys schools?
Guest  
25 Sep 2008 /  #17
we are currently doing a research project on poland have been asked to research on the schooling system in poland. we need to find out about the curriculum followed in polish schools and the qualifications needed to teach in polish schools.

could anybody help us please.
thank you
Switezianka - | 463  
26 Sep 2008 /  #18
I'm currently doing some research, but I can't find out if the schools in Poland are co-ed or not. can someone tell me if there are strictly girls schools and strictly boys schools?

Public schools are co-ed. There are some Catholic schools that aren't but there are very little of them.

qualifications needed to teach in polish schools.

Primary:
magister (M.A.) in pedagogy
Secondary:
magister in the subject taught + teaching methodology course

sometimes a teacher can get a course in some new subject and become quilified to teach it

we need to find out about the curriculum followed in polish schools

You must be kidding! That's a few hundred pages of data - a forum is not a place to get such info. Better try the Ministry of Education...
Guest  
5 Oct 2008 /  #19
how many kids in each class usually?
Switezianka - | 463  
6 Oct 2008 /  #20
About 30. For some classes (P.E, languages) the classes are divided into two groups.
drew  
29 Apr 2009 /  #21
Are there any good technology colleges in Poland?

Archives - 2005-2009 / Life / The School Year in Polish SchoolsArchived