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Who's thinking of moving to Poland?


RJ_cdn - | 267  
1 Jan 2008 /  #31
Michal, to refresh your memory: polishforums.com/polish_dentists_good_cheap-7_16501_0.html

Quoting: Lukasz
you have been to Poland 20 years ago ...

Ponad dwadzieścia lat temu.

Michal - | 1,865  
2 Jan 2008 /  #32
I am not sure what you are referring to but the last time I was in Kraków was in August 1986.
polishcanuck 7 | 462  
2 Jan 2008 /  #33
Michal, i really don't want to hear from you at all. Your knowledge of poland specializes in the communist era. To me you're just a wiesniak/prostak.
Michal - | 1,865  
3 Jan 2008 /  #34
Another example of a another rude Pole who so loves his 'ojczyzna' that he prefers to live five thousand miles away in Canada. In Moscow all I heard from the Poles, Churchill sold us to Stalin. Very, very strange lot you Poles. Has it never ocured to you that Poland itself sold itself to Jozef Stalin?
Macduff 9 | 69  
3 Jan 2008 /  #35
A & D but still work offshore
Michal - | 1,865  
3 Jan 2008 /  #36
Anyway, to answer your question, certainly NOT me! I would never live in Poland with all the crime and corruption. You can get knocked over the head and robbed and traveling by train is out as they will steal your wallet and then throw your body out on to the railway line to hide the evidence. What a way to finish off a holiday. You certainly can not beat Southend-On-Sea for a day out!
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
3 Jan 2008 /  #37
I think u have been reading about Red Watch Michał. They are brutal skinheads but many countries have such people. I never fear for my life on a train
Macduff 9 | 69  
3 Jan 2008 /  #38
I feel safer in the streets and trains than I do in most big citys in Scotland!
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498  
3 Jan 2008 /  #39
That was how I felt when I was there.
CaleyJags 1 | 38  
4 Jan 2008 /  #40
Czesc

I'm Scottish and have lived in Warsaw for one year, i was transferred here by my company but my contract finished last summer, so instead of moving to another country with my old company i stayed in Warsaw to work with a new company which was one of the best decisions i've made in my life.

I have a great circle of friends who are in a similiar position as myself (working in a foreign country) and i'm learning Polish which is difficult and frustrating but i'm enjoying the challenge so far.

I can only really speak for Warsaw and from the people who i've met i can assure you that there are alot more Brits here than i first thought and all have a very good opinion of Warsaw including the culture and people, Poles are some of the nicest people i've met and i've worked in a few countries.

If you have the chance to move here i would highly recommend it.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Jan 2008 /  #41
I agree with my Scottish compadres, I feel safer here in Poland than in Aberdeen for example. Gliwice is a city of study so there are many academic types. There is a definite mafia contingent here but they aren't hostile towards us foreigners. Scots tend to like Poles. Noimmigration, u'd c it 4 urself if u came out here man. The Poles like us!!
CaleyJags 1 | 38  
4 Jan 2008 /  #42
I feel safer here in Poland than in Aberdeen for example

Anywhere is safer than Aberdeen Seanus, the damm seagulls are the worst :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Jan 2008 /  #43
Inverness is generally quite safe tho, I'm only aware of 1 bad part, the Ferrylands or sth u call it? My grandparents live on Annfield Road, it's near the 2 big parks and not so far from the Caledonian Hotel. I like going up to Inverness. Popular with Poles too. It's good 2 c Scots having a good time here
CaleyJags 1 | 38  
4 Jan 2008 /  #44
I'm only aware of 1 bad part, the Ferrylands or sth u call it?

Yeah it's called the Ferry, very nasty place but tame compared to other Scottish towns.

I was back for xmas and had a great time, saw some sexy football and sampled some fine Scottish Malts.

I know where your Grandparents live, i am from Cradlehall which is just beyond Raigmore hospital.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Jan 2008 /  #45
Raigmore is where my grandad was a psychiatrist for many years. He was quite well known in his day, Ronald Caddell. The family house was Burnside which I think was beside Raigmore
CaleyJags 1 | 38  
4 Jan 2008 /  #46
Which part of Poland do you live in Seanus???

I know Burnside, it's next to Raigmore.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Jan 2008 /  #47
I live in Gliwice, Silesia.
CaleyJags 1 | 38  
4 Jan 2008 /  #48
Very nice.

What made you move out there, woman???
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Jan 2008 /  #49
Nah, u've gotta like ur job. I'm a teacher here. Poland has a booming TEFL market and are keen to learn so I figured it made sense to come out here. I've been here for 3 years now. Women are just one part of life.
Michal - | 1,865  
4 Jan 2008 /  #50
The Poles like us!!

I think you meant to say that the Poles like the colour of your money!
CaleyJags 1 | 38  
4 Jan 2008 /  #51
Sorry for thinking it was a woman who was responsible for dragging you to Poland Seanus.

I have lots of Friends who teach in Warsaw, some love and some hate it.

I think in Warsaw we have too many English teachers so maybe it is better to work in smaller towns and cities.
Harry  
4 Jan 2008 /  #52
I think in Warsaw we have too many English teachers so maybe it is better to work in smaller towns and cities.

No way! Schools are always looking for teachers in Warsaw.
CaleyJags 1 | 38  
4 Jan 2008 /  #53
You are right Harry. I've seen lots of advertisments online. I have met lots of Teachers in Warsaw, just thought that there must be too many but obviously i'm wrong.
Michal - | 1,865  
7 Jan 2008 /  #54
No way! Schools are always looking for teachers in Warsaw.

Yes, they will be looking but have you seen what an English Language Teacher earns in Poland? He/she will be lucky to earn more than £100 per month. You would do better by staying in England and living on Social security. What is the point of being exploited by the Poles, they will steal all your knowledge and then they just throw you out or replace you with another teacher. I have never been a teacher in Poland, thank God, but I do know someone who was and it was not a very pleasant experience. If the students do not like your lessons they simply complain and you are thrown out and replaced by another teacher. The Polish heads of these schools are not daft and know that they can induce enough Americans and Canadians to refill their vacancies on a day to day basis if they have to.
ukpolska  
7 Jan 2008 /  #55
He/she will be lucky to earn more than £100 per month.

Where on earth do you get these figures??
It is simply not true.

I have never been a teacher in Poland, thank God, but I do know someone who was and it was not a very pleasant experience.

So you are saying one example makes a rule. Jesus, what a dinosaur you are!!
I thought you was getting better Michal but still you come back with this outdated crap.

To the poster ignore this twit, just go to his profile and read his posts and you will see what he is like.
I know  
7 Jan 2008 /  #56
lets say 40zl an hour, 5 hours a day. 5 days a week. I'd say thats 1000zl a week for 25 hrs. That is much more realistic.
telefonitika  
7 Jan 2008 /  #57
I'd say thats 1000zl a week for 25 hrs. That is much more realistic.

that would work out at £206 a week x 4 = £824 a month before deductions i would say that is not bad for Part Time hours which is what 25 hours a week is
lef 11 | 478  
7 Jan 2008 /  #58
Thats assuming a lot.... what about the tax ? 25 hrs ends up being much more..
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
7 Jan 2008 /  #59
£206 a week x 4 = £824

or

206 x 52 / 12 which equalls 892 GBP per month - that extra 70 quid buys a lot of beer
I know  
7 Jan 2008 /  #60
This is more than feasible. Teachers who teach Callan, with little or no experience can earn between 25zl and 45zl after deductions. Private lessons between 40zl to 60zl. Qualified native speaking Tefl qualified teachers anywhere between 45 to 70zl. This is all calculated at an hourly rate. Then there are specialist teachers and in-company training. Which pushes the rate much higher. Depending on a variety of factors.

This is before mentioning the many native speakers who are Directors of Studies and or own their own language schools. Again cunning linguists with talent and skill will always be in demand.

Oh did I forget to mention proof reading, in fact there are numerous spin offs.

The path of a language teacher abroad, fraught with difficulties momments of being suspended in reality and lost in translation. Is however, a rocky road of discovery and despite the curse of the odd bods who inhabit the travelling teacher circus the possibility of new worlds and a sense of achievement is out there. Here endth the lesson.

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