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Irish man wanna move to Poland


SeanBM  
5 Dec 2008 /  #31
terminal disease.

suicide

Yo'll have fun now, ya hear!.
And don't come back.
jedrula  
5 Dec 2008 /  #32
Im Irish and im hoping to move to Krakow at the end of January, coz herself is Polish and im mad about her and i want to learn the language also. I have taken Polish lessons so i have a basis in the language I have been to Poland a number of times at this stage.

Just wondering do u have any tips?
SeanBM  
5 Dec 2008 /  #33
Hello jedrula,
I am Irish and I live near Krakow.

I think the best thing you can do is learn the language.
I do not speak very well but I am learning.

Have you a job here?
Teaching English can be good money.
jedrula  
13 Dec 2008 /  #34
Yeap i was looking into that, im a qualified civil engineer with over 2 years experience so i was hoping to get work in this area,but the job opertunities in this area seem only to be in Warsaw. Its very frustrating. Is nice to hear an Irish person is hanging around the place and is not in Krakow just for a stag party
SeanBM  
13 Dec 2008 /  #35
im a qualified civil engineer with over 2 years experience

There should be loads of work here for you so.
Poland is going through what Ireland went through years ago and there is huge amounts of roads being built.

but the job opertunities in this area seem only to be in Warsaw.

It should be nationwide and civil engineers are in demand for the work load.
The language of course is a draw back, i do not know how that would work but you should be able to find something.

Is nice to hear an Irish person is hanging around the place and is not in Krakow just for a stag party

I enjoy living here very much.
It is very similar and very different to Ireland.
Extreme temperature differences but good craic .
eejit  
13 Dec 2008 /  #36
Sean BM how on earth can you describe living in Poland as good craic?! I lived there for two years and whilst people can be quite nice, friendly and good natured they're quite stiff compared to the Irish, and the sense of humour does not pervade everyday life as it does here.
SeanBM  
13 Dec 2008 /  #37
Sean BM how on earth can you describe living in Poland as good craic?!

I enjoy living here.

I lived there for two years and whilst people can be quite nice, friendly and good natured

Agreed

they're quite stiff compared to the Irish

I know what you mean, northern Europeans are a bit more serious.

the sense of humour does not pervade everyday life as it does here.

I wouldn't agree with that.

Do you speak Polish?
Where did you live?




Sean BM how on earth can you describe living in Poland as good craic?!

Just for context, which post did I describe living in Poland as good craic?
I do not think the bureaucracy is fun but as i said, I enjoy living here very much.
Seanus  
13 Dec 2008 /  #38
Many Poles are shocked that I'd want to live here. I got the 'why are you staying here?' piece from the secretaries from my school. I prefer to see the glass as being half full. There are many positives here.

The ones who aren't victims of voodoo economics may find life harsh here. Tightening the belt does become important, esp if you want to build a family and commute to work. Still, Poland has its rewards.
jedrula  
15 Dec 2008 /  #39
In Kraków at the moment, its so much easier to learn the language when you can hear everybody speaking it, however it does get a little depressing when i see very young kids who can speak it better then me. Is there much of an Irish community over hear? never really heard much about it. GAA club perhaps? seeing as there is one of those in every other major city around the world.
Seanus  
15 Dec 2008 /  #40
SeanBM is your man in the know
SeanBM  
15 Dec 2008 /  #41
Hello jedrula,

I think there are a few of us on the loose around.
Try the Irish arms bar.
There are a few Irish bars in Krakow but this is the best, in my opinion.
There is also "Nic Nowego (translation is "nothing New") which is also one of the older established (Irish owned)bars in Krakow. "Nic Nowego" is Irish owned but does not play the "Irish" card.

I have only been to each of these about 5 or 6 times. The Irish Arms has a football team. There are more irish bars the "Irish Mbassy" and a couple more but I have never been to them. My information is old and things might have changed or premises might have changed hands, I do not know but it might help your homw sick blues.

And yes it is a lot easier to learn the language once here .

Good luck
polishstaff  
15 Dec 2008 /  #42
You are more then welcome in Poland but under one condition:
You will bring all of those pubs with you mait :-) they are closing down any way :-)
krakow  
31 Dec 2008 /  #43
SIXTH STAGE: MULDUNEK!!
backhander  
10 Jan 2009 /  #44
Hi, I have recently moved to Poland with my beuatiful polish girlfriend. We have a nice apartment in Katowice and have been here for one week now. I dont have work yet but will be starting my TEFL course online and will also start to learn polish and have some savings which will last about 6 months. Are there any other brits in the Katowice area who can offer advice/tips on anything really, to do with living in Poland and finding work etc
kmoursy  
10 Jan 2009 /  #45
Been here almost 7 years now from Blackrck,theres a shiteload of us here.
ES  
8 Feb 2009 /  #46
Hi, I have a boyfriend from Ireland and he is thinking of moving to Poland (Szczecin), could anyone share some expirience or fancy for a meeting?

Hi Jinky, I know Irish man (construction-build-scaffolding), he will be in March in Poland , let me know if You would like to contact
Johnny_Trotter  
12 Feb 2009 /  #47
I'm Irish, and my Polish wife and I are considering moving to Poznań in a few months. She'd like to finish her studies (that she put on hold) and I'd like to work on my level of Polish.

However, its a bit interesting for us; I am very keen for us to move there, and she has been more reluctant, but she is coming around to the idea of us going thre. I've spent a few days reading through the main highlights on this site, and it's been... interesting! Many positives and negatives, but it hasn't detracted from my interest so far.
jesse23  
16 Feb 2009 /  #48
I don't think i went through those stages, Yes I miss my friends and family but iam not depressed over it lol.
My boyfriend is Polish and teaches me the best things about Poland like the culture, history and family, I'm an English native and i come from England I teach English although i'm without a certificate and will be taking the TEFL in the summer i am still working with a school and have many private students.

I like it here and anyone who wants to move here I say go for it, yes it may not be for everyone but enjoy this country and culture and in the summer is the best time to see Poland they show there true bright colours.
malolo  
7 Mar 2009 /  #49
hi everyone!

i'm polish and i'm living in ireland at the moment,

just reading away your posts...

wishing you all the best in getting used to living in poland, finding jobs, and picking the language!

you're more than welcome anyway!

and i'm sure you'll be all fine! :)
SeanBM  
7 Mar 2009 /  #50
Hello malolo,

Whereabouts in Ireland are you living?.
I'm from Dublin and i live near Krakow.
We traded places :)
malolo  
8 Mar 2009 /  #51
hi SeanBM!

living in cork, are you from here? :)

how do you find living in krakow anyway?
have you been there long?

oh yea, you're from dublin! just got it now :)
trevorisimo  
12 Aug 2009 /  #52
Hi guys my name is Trevor and im 25, ive first hand experience living in poland.

I moved there in Sepetember 2007, was fed up with my job here and my gf wanted to move back home so we tried it for while. At the time people were screaming to hire me, literally when I got off the plane I was rushing immediately to a school, got hired within 3 days of being there which is unheard of in Ireland.

We moved to Warsaw, stayed with my gf parents for few weeks until we got our own rental property(in Piaseczo, 45 mins from Warsaw). We just stayed 3 months as I had bad job experience there and my gf job was poorly paid and far away so we decided it was time to return back to Ireland to make more money.

We are in the process of building property in Poland, her dad gave us some land. However its been 2 years and the paper work is still going through so its long old process.

We have just bought house here, our ultimate plan is to build the house there, and when our mortgage is paid off here, we sell up in Ireland and move there, almost retirement but will have alot of money saved by then.

I wont lie, it was awful being a foreigner when your abroad, you can only then realise what the polish go through when they come abroad to work. Its so lonely when nobody speaks fluent english, id always advise you to complete at least intermediate polish before moving, they say you can pick it up as you go along but that wouldnt really be practical in my opinion.

I couldnt get a NIP number there, think you have to be resident and nobody could tell us where to get one of those numbers. In most of the big cities there is company called 'The British Council', they are the mecca for any teachers going over there, lots of learning resources, its basically a library and also you can do courses there and rent english DVDs.

Thinking back, I regret I came back to Ireland because I did intend to go for a year but we took the easy option and came back here.

When I first got to Warsaw, maybe you too will find you will latch onto anyone who speaks english, you hear someone speak english and you hang in their vicinity so they they may hopefully strike conversation with you,,, or maybe its just me then.

I only ever met 1 irish person there, mostly Brits and Australians, people backpacking and of course some Americans whose great great grandfathers pigeon had some polish heritgage,lol. Just messing.

Any questions just ask me, from someone with experience.
jedrula  
17 Aug 2009 /  #53
Trevorisimo

Im irish and also lucky enough to have a Polish girlfriend :) I hoping to move there soon (i have being trying to move there for the past year) but i would like to get a job first. Im a civil engineer but like most engineers in Ireland at the moment im now out of work :( i was in Krakow recently completing a 2 week intensive language course so my polish isnt so bad now. I have been to Poland maybe 16/17 times now so there is nothing too new now with regard to the country itself.

I see some similarities with Ireland but in other ways i see big differences, but any advice with regard to everyday life in poland?
vndunne  
18 Aug 2009 /  #54
Jedrula, would you like to know anything specific about everyday life?
Vincent
tim  
18 Aug 2009 /  #55
Hi,

I am Irish and my wife is from Katowice. We have a few investments there and are considering moving to Katowice in the near future. Would be really nice to keep in touch. My e-mail address is ewaobrien@aol.com. I am looking forward to your reply. Please send me your e-mail or contact phone number.

Regards.

Tim
SeanBM  
18 Aug 2009 /  #56
Hello jedrula and tim,

And welcome to the Polish forums.

any advice with regard to everyday life in poland?

I think what you are doing, learning the language is a must.
And living in a city, at first anyway, will help a lot.

I don't know if either of you have ever lived in a country that you don't know how to speak the language but it does isolate you.

Even though most people in cities in Poland speak some English, it is still not enough.
Also just for the common curtsy.
I speak Polish but not as well as I would like, it is hard but not impossible.

Krakow is a great city on almost all levels, i am not too familar with Katowice.

I see some similarities with Ireland but in other ways i see big differences

Yes, Catholicism, a history full of tragedy and alcohol :)
These three similarities has a huge effect, we have very similar sensibilities and humour.
I feel more at home here then other countries I have lived in.

The big difference is what communism left behind. Although communism can be seen as a kind of occupation of the country, the bizarre systems and frustrating bureaucracy is mind boggling to say the least but it continue to change for the better.

Although teaching English is probably the number one option here for English speakers, you should probably try to find something you are interested in (if you are not interested in teaching) but teaching English is not a bad fall back position if anything goes wrong with your primary work.

Also getting some credible teaching certificate can help you in the beginning until you find your feet.

I will stop there, if you have any questions just ask.

Best of luck to you both.
Mala24  
18 Aug 2009 /  #57
Hi

I am Polish and my boyfriend is Irish. We made a decision to move to Poland and try to settle there for a while. He just graduated and got his degree. He is doing TEFL course at the moment cause he wants to teach in Poland. We have sent so many CV's to many schools but nobody has replied yet. I am so worried he will not get a job or will be so lonely over there.

Has anybody any idea how to get into teaching any other way?I am thinking as well that he has a basic polish.is it enough?

Thank you for any help.
SeanBM  
18 Aug 2009 /  #58
Hello Mala24,

And welcome to the Polish Forums.

Has anybody any idea how to get into teaching any other way?

It depends on where he is teaching.
A lot of English schools are open during the academic year and close for the summer holidays.

I am thinking as well that he has a basic polish.is it enough?

I recommend living in a big city in that case and teach him more Polis :)

Good luck!.
Mr Grunwald  
19 Aug 2009 /  #59
I recommend living in a big city in that case and teach him more Polis :)

Good luck!.

The great guide for the future!
I want that job! :(

You all folx, here are some facts. It's all crap in Poland, but you will get soo attached that you will watch it as non crappy and have problems forgetting it or leaving it :)

So I wish you all good luck and I hope you will stay here on the forum and in poland ;)
jedrula  
20 Aug 2009 /  #60
vndunne

Vincent,

Im just wondering how everyday life goes in Poland e.g is it better to have a car or not? i have one and its only when i moved to Poland for the 2.5 weeks i found that i depended alot. I also found the whole "not really understanding" what was going on in the TV very frustrating (not that i watch too much TV) but i usually watch some when im relaxing.

did you come across these issues?

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