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Expats in Poland: Are you going to live in Poland long or short term?


Lonman 4 | 111  
14 Sep 2007 /  #1
Thanks for the warm greatings so far...

Those of you who are expats, do you like living in Poland for the short or long term?
hello 22 | 891  
14 Sep 2007 /  #2
I'm not expat, but I think most of expats in Poland live short term there - those who live long term are married to Polish women (or men). Maybe some elder expats prefer to live in Poland too...
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
14 Sep 2007 /  #3
I don't like the term Expat and never think of myself as such. I'm here for the long term.
hello 22 | 891  
14 Sep 2007 /  #4
But the term expat refers to a foreigner who lives in Poland, not a native Pole living in Poland :)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
14 Sep 2007 /  #5
I'm not a native Pole. I was born in the UK.
hello 22 | 891  
14 Sep 2007 /  #6
OK, so then then you are right.. :) But what were the reasons you moved to Poland? I guess you married a Polish woman and stayed there or got a GREAT job and stayed there..
ukpolska  
14 Sep 2007 /  #7
I have lived here for over seven years now after I met my Polish girlfriend (wife now) in London where I was working for Lloyds of London. I moved here because my wife didn’t want to move to England and be apart from her family and I must say it was the best choice I have ever made. Polish families are very close and the support that we get from her family is amazing; I suppose that is religion for you at least that is the case for my wife and her family. Personally it’s not my cup of tea!! :o)

Now we have a five-year-old daughter and to be honest I don’t think I will ever move back until she is old enough to care for herself, because the education system here is much better than the UK and getting better.

I have a business here as well and I think it is easier for a Brit to make a living and provide a good life for his family than bashing your head against the wall in the UK.

I would advise anyone who is coming to Poland to go self-employed as in the 1st two years you only pay 50% national insurance contributions and this helps a hell of a lot when you are setting up a business here.

All in all it’s a good life here, cheep beer, cheep vodka, and the weather is great as well, you get a cold winter with snow along with a hot summer (usually).
OP Lonman 4 | 111  
14 Sep 2007 /  #8
I guess this is my first thread…
At the moment I am fact finding. Currently I am an American living in Beirut so coming to Poland, if I do, is a step up.

For the short term what is rent like for an apartment in central Poland say Kutno for example. Utilities costs and food?
How do you like the people ( I assume you like them since you are there)? How about one positive and one negative? For example Lebanese are known for their hospitality.

If a guy was coming to spend 6 months what advice would you give?
As far as long term, if I do meet the next (first) Mrs. Lonman in Poland, that would be fine. But not the main reason visiting.

I also see the value of the dollar keeps going lower, how is that effecting life for people living off the dollar? I see a post that all the important stuff, beer is cheep but how about the rest like Nutella (yes addicted now)?

I don't like the term Expat and never think of myself as such. I'm here for the long term.

from Encarta dictionary:
a citizen who has left his or her own country to live in another, usually for a prolonged period
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
14 Sep 2007 /  #9
a citizen who has left his or her own country to live in another, usually for a prolonged period

I know what the dictionary definition means. But in real life the term suggests: someone with cash who has gone to retire in another country.
Avalon 4 | 1,068  
14 Sep 2007 /  #10
Agree with "Wroclaw" and I am also here for the long term, love Poland.
w/ Bydgoszcz  
14 Sep 2007 /  #11
I'm here for at least two years.
Polanglik 11 | 303  
14 Sep 2007 /  #12
because the education system here is much better than the UK and getting better.

I am also planning to move my family over to Poland , hopefully in the next year or two. My wife is Polish born (Wroclaw), whilst I consider myself a Pole who was born in England; (parents and grandparents are Polish born).

We have two young children, aged 5 and 4 who are already bi-lingual; they are in a very good Roman Catholic school here in London, and the only concern is that they get a good education once we go to live in Poland.

What would people recommend - once we move to Poland, it will be either Warsaw or Krakow; is an international (English speaking) school better than the Polish state schools ? I know the International schools are quite expensive, but when it comes to my kids education one will make sacrifices to make sure they get the best :o)

England has changed considerably over the last 5-10 years, unfortunately for the worse, and I feel that Poland will give us a better quality of life. I am in Poland nearly every month and feel very much at home there; I suppose being able to speak the language fluently helps.

I am in Poland next 29th Sept to 12th October, in Krakow for about 3-4 days and then mostly in Warsaw. Anyone want to meet up for a drink or two send me an email.

Polanglik
OP Lonman 4 | 111  
14 Sep 2007 /  #13
someone with cash who has gone to retire in another country.

one of te reasons I am thinking Poland because I am not retired and don't have a lot of cash by US standards... but compared to the rest of the world I'm rich.
joda 3 | 24  
15 Sep 2007 /  #14
Hi Lonman,
My wife and i just moved to Poznań, 6 weeks ago. We're retired.
The reasons we moved are........
1.ALL my ancestors are from Poland.
2.I have a large family in Poland I never knew about.
3.We very much like Poland and, of course, it's people.
4. Even with the huge cost of living changes since Poland joined the EU, it's still cheaper here than the U.S.
5.We plan on staying.

I keep a daily blog since we moved here with observations, prices, papers we needed to make the move, problems and solutions, comments, etc, etc.. Maybe it could be of some use to you.

david-polanddavid.blogspot.com
Poznan  
15 Sep 2007 /  #15
My Polish born wife and I plan on staying a year or so, longer if any opportunities present themselves.

Living in Poznan.
Mobs - | 1  
15 Sep 2007 /  #16
My wife and I are here on leave from my work for the next 2 years. We came on a 2 year contract but then we must return to Aus. to finish working there. It hasn't been an easy start (the bureaucracy is a nightmare here) but we are enjoying the place and the people we have met. If the weather improves, things should start looking up!
OP Lonman 4 | 111  
15 Sep 2007 /  #17
Joda thanks for the comments and the blog... I took a look and bookmaked it for further reading.

Mobs
yes understand bureaucracy as I have been in the Middle East for 5 months now...

So maybe poland will be sort of Same same but different. as they say...

I could be probably find this out but how long can u stay on a tourist visa?
Marius 1 | 33  
18 Sep 2007 /  #18
I know what the dictionary definition means. But in real life the term suggests: someone with cash who has gone to retire in another country.

Why do you think so, Wroclaw?

I will be an expat as from next week, moreover since I have an international background and education I know some expats, none of which fit your description actually. As for myself, I like working international and being part of a dynamic, developing environment, which will stimulate me to grow and develop as well. The expats I know are all young, ambitious and driven people, preferring to working in an international environment.

I am interested in your feedback and ideas on this.
ukpolska  
18 Sep 2007 /  #19
But in real life the term suggests: someone with cash who has gone to retire in another country.

Maybe its a personal definition. I really don't like the term either, it reminds me of the old colonial empire in Africa; so I sort of understand where Wroclaw is coming from, toodle pip, chocks away, and all that old twoddle.

If your children are already bi-lingual then I would search out a good Polish school for them. In Pulawy we are quite fortunate that the schools here are very good and although our daughter is only in the 1st class we can see that she is doing well and she is very proud of her homework that she brings home, which to be honest is nothing hardly, but she is getting used to the idea. One funny thing though, she has English classes as she doesn't want to be left out from the rest of the class, and the teacher is scared to ask her any questions as she keeps on correcting the teacher on her English, and we have had to have a word with our daughter because the teacher is embarrassed. The trouble is at that age almost anyone with a basic FCE English can teach children, and the standard is not very high.
OP Lonman 4 | 111  
19 Sep 2007 /  #20
I'm in Krakow the 29th and part of the 30th. Ill drop you a PM with my hotel phone if you will be in Krakow then. Will be solo until the 30th when I meet my local friends.
IanEngland - | 1  
23 Sep 2007 /  #21
Dzień dobry! My wife and I will be in Kraków from the 27 Sep for 5 days to check out the lifestyle.

We will also be on a roller-coaster ride of hitting the tourist spots and taking in the Polish culture.

Ref your e-mails (quoting both: Lonman and Polanglik), if you would like to meet up for a drink or two send me an e-mail and I'll send our contact number.

Dziękuję.
paulinuk - | 12  
15 Dec 2007 /  #22
I wanted to come here to live but due to prperty prices going crazy i cannot afford it pity,should have bought 8 years ago pity
telefonitika  
15 Dec 2007 /  #23
paulinuk

depends where you look and what to be i guess?

Im going in next two years starting ball rolling already by looking into areas i wish to be in, hope to secure employment first then relocate permenantly there.

Enquiring about schools and things as well in the areas so i can look into these as moving with my daughter, she doesnt speak polish at the minute but i even if myself have only been learning a year so far am trying to teach her a few things first :)
wildrover 98 | 4,451  
15 Dec 2007 /  #24
Expats in Poland: Are you going to live in Poland long or short term?

I am going to die in Poland....hopefully not in the near future tho.....
johnkelleran  
16 Dec 2007 /  #25
I just moved here with my Polish wife and our two American born kids. We moved here to open our coffee roasting business and improve the quality of our lives. We also like the education here much more than in the states. And later for University, we felt they'd be much better off in the EU. Now our challenge is to sell enough coffee beans so I won't have to fly back to the states so much to do jobs.
Mufasa 19 | 358  
16 Dec 2007 /  #26
But in real life the term suggests: someone with cash who has gone to retire in another country.

Don't you think this is a bit narrow? It is certainly not true for us. (We've been here 16 months, and plan to stay until 2010)
johnkelleran  
16 Dec 2007 /  #27
As I said, I thought I was registered as I'm requested to use my password when I attempt to post. I'll make myself some more coffee and stay up until I can figure it out.
johnkelleran - | 9  
16 Dec 2007 /  #28
registered. Now I can stay here in Poland.
rex - | 37  
16 Dec 2007 /  #29
good to you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
telefonitika  
16 Dec 2007 /  #30
Ignore Rex also known as Zeze previously known as Zion!!

He is an immigrant in Poland that hates it but married a polish girl for a visa to work in an IT office in Warsaw.. so he is kinda hating the situation but ignore his crap and you will be okay :)

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