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AMERICAN-STYLE SLOB CHIC IN POLAND?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
24 Sep 2008 /  #1
To what extent has the American-style slob chic taken root in Poland? You know --people gouing round in scuffled adidas sports shoes, trainers or T-shirts, wearing baseball caps, swilling beer straight from the bottle or can, talking 10 decibels too loud in public, burpuing, breaking wind, using foul language and thinking this makes them o so trendy. And females trying to act just as yobby and slobby.

Or do most Poles regard such behaviour as "niekulturalny"?
rdywenur 1 | 157  
24 Sep 2008 /  #2
Since when has this been just an American style form of behaviour...eeeeeeeeeeeeexuse me. Bad behaviour is bad behaviour and it is never been bound by American boundaries only......it exists all over the world and don't blame us for it.
joepilsudski 26 | 1,389  
24 Sep 2008 /  #3
'Slob-chic' in America was created by Black Americans and mass-marketed by Jews...Later, some low class White Americans, sometimes referred to as 'Wiggers' adopted this 'fashion-style' and added various touches...IMHO, it is disgusting, and a sure sign of lack of culture...I would suggest Poland develop it's own 'Slav-Chic', as there are surely many talented Polish fashion designers who could create such a style...I am serious...Some elements of traditional Polish dress/design could be updated and re-interpreted...A good idea, I think...Why Paris, Paris, Paris for fashion, and not Warsaw?
Ozi Dan 26 | 569  
25 Sep 2008 /  #4
'Slav-Chic'

My dad's idea of 'Slav chic' in the 1980's was European leisure pants, a mesh vest, kung fu shoes and wrap around Rudi Project cycling glasses - perhaps a revival along those lines?
jonni 16 | 2,485  
25 Sep 2008 /  #5
Poland is the land of baseball caps and beer from the can. Nothing new, and I'm not sure how American that is - seems to be standard attire in east/central Eurtope. Also popular here now are rather garish tracksuits and sneakers. It's a shame because they don't suit 90% of the people who wear them.

One good thing in PL is that older people still dress very well.
ParisJazz - | 172  
25 Sep 2008 /  #6
Why Paris, Paris, Paris for fashion, and not Warsaw?

You might as well carry on:

Why Milan for the Prêt à porter and not Warsaw
Why the City of London for capital markets and not Warsaw
Why Ibiza for the coolest parties and now Warsaw

Cause Warsaw is a grey and dull post-communist city that most ppl wouldn't be able to locate on a map.

Also, things develop over time and cant just be legislated or imposed. Fashion in Paris started in the end of the 19th century, Ibiza's culture was built by the early hippies who went there in the 70s, and London has always been a major financial hub since the days of the British empire.

I admire your enthusiasm for the city of Warsaw but u have to admit that some things will never happen. Prague, for instance, is a much cooler place with a lot of chic, flair and a vibrant city life.

PJ
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
25 Sep 2008 /  #7
t

Why Paris, Paris, Paris

Thats like asking why athletes prefer Adidas rather than Ellesse
loco polaco 3 | 353  
25 Sep 2008 /  #8
'Slob-chic' in America was created by Black Americans and mass-marketed by Jews...Later, some low class White Americans, sometimes referred to as 'Wiggers' adopted this 'fashion-style' and added various touches...

wtf are you talking about.. why just make up ****?

Prague, for instance, is a much cooler place with a lot of chic, flair and a vibrant city life.

sure is losing it's "charm". warsaw and krakow are way better. up and coming if not completely there yet. 3city is up there too.
ParisJazz - | 172  
25 Sep 2008 /  #9
sure is losing it's "charm". Warsaw and Krakow are way better

Prague might be losing its charm, although I personally disagree, but Warsaw never had any and will never have any
loco polaco 3 | 353  
25 Sep 2008 /  #10
i guess you've never been to warsaw then because it's awesome.
ParisJazz - | 172  
25 Sep 2008 /  #11
I guess it doesn't take much to get u in awe :)

Been to Warsaw over 10 times, and counting.
Somerled 5 | 93  
26 Sep 2008 /  #12
I think some are starting to adopt the "frat boy douchebag" look. Popped collars on pastel shirts, uncombed hair, a blank facial expression...

I've seen a few of these mouth-breathers around. More prevalent thought are the "sport handsomes" in their dashing track-suits and over-gelled hair.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
26 Sep 2008 /  #13
i guess you've never been to warsaw then because it's awesome.

er, warsaw awesome... i think not

perhaps you have never been anywhere awsome to compare

there are those in poland who are wonderfully creative in their dress sense - born of a desire to be cool and different combined with a lack of money and choice. the results look good and they carry it off well
Kilkline 1 | 689  
26 Sep 2008 /  #14
My dad's idea of 'Slav chic' in the 1980's was European leisure pants, a mesh vest, kung fu shoes and wrap around Rudi Project cycling glasses - perhaps a revival along those lines?

Brogues with tracksuit bottoms and a woolly sweater anyone?

Its difficult for Poles to dress well though as outside of the major metropolitan areas the shops are lousy and the cost high relative to income.
rdywenur 1 | 157  
27 Sep 2008 /  #15
I have never heard of Slob Chic except here. The blacks wear Hip Hop style and then the whites wear Grunge which is outdated so I'm thinking you must mean the Hip hop style. Pants worn at the ankles, giant baggy t-shirts, hat sideways and backwards. tons of chunky Bling....y-U-K and they call that style. (well I guess it s a style but tasteless)
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
28 Sep 2008 /  #16
Thread attached on merging:
Poland's American-inspired slob chic

When I asked to what extent was American-style slob chic was accepted in Poland, I made the mistake of introducing clothing styles which led the discussion off on a fashion tangent. However, what I had wanted to establish was whether and, if so, why the bad manners associated with that style, all the is rude,crude, brutal and vulgar has gained acceptance among Poland's younger generation. That would include loud, foul language in public, lack of respect for others, failure to give up a tram seat to an OAP, also stadium violence (although obviously Euro/Brit, not US-inspried). Is the term "niekulturalny" still used in Poland to describe such underclass behaviour?
rdywenur 1 | 157  
28 Sep 2008 /  #17
You have underclass behaviour in all countires around the world. Maybe the vulgar behaviour also relates to the vulgar style of dress. Like youa re what you eat ...you also are what you wear. Clothes are only an extension of one's personality.
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240  
28 Sep 2008 /  #18
"niekulturalny"

the term pyskate sukiwould be more appropriate here

;)
LondonChick 31 | 1,134  
28 Sep 2008 /  #19
Not sure what you're getting at here, Polonius3.

I've witnessed some ugly behaviour from the suited and booted types.
rdywenur 1 | 157  
28 Sep 2008 /  #20
Yes there are many wolves hiding in sheeps clothing :P
Switezianka - | 463  
28 Sep 2008 /  #21
I've witnessed some ugly behaviour from the suited and booted types.

Were you watching Polish Sejm session?
Somerled 5 | 93  
28 Sep 2008 /  #22
Is the term "niekulturalny" still used in Poland to describe such underclass behaviour?

It wasn't already?
LondonChick 31 | 1,134  
5 Oct 2008 /  #23
Were you watching Polish Sejm session?

Um, sorry... what does this mean?
Foreigner4 12 | 1,769  
5 Oct 2008 /  #24
talking 10 decibels too loud in public

soooooo not only an American thing buddy, i'd say Poles are naturally VERY LOUD talkers

using foul language

ohhh yeah that one is completely American, if it wasn't for the yanks all the louts on the buses and trams would be "proszę" this and "proszę" that...

mr. sar meet mr. casim

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