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WHY POLISH PEOPLE DON'T USE THEIR NATIVE FIRST NAME WHEN ABROAD?


pamlarouge 3 | 56  
1 Nov 2007 /  #61
my ex was called Piotrek too and it always annoyed me when he told people his name was Peter

I second that!!! Piotrek is not hard to pronounce at all...and generally people will catch on after a few times, but he's the kind of guy who wants to make things easier for everyone so he won't listen to me :)

As for surnames, well thats another story altogether!

So true-his first name isn't so hard, but his last name took some practice for me to get it right :)

You're welcome.

LOL Language lazy people everywhere should appreciate this gesture :)
Magdalena 3 | 1,837  
3 Nov 2007 /  #62
How about this - my name, as you know, is Magdalena. There is not a single fricative or affricate in sight (I mean those terrifying consonant clusters like "rz"). ;-)

In fact, my name is Hebrew and comes from the Bible, so it's recognized all over Europe.
Or is it?
I have had British people ask me repeatedly what my name was when I introduced myself:
they couldn't get it right - they would change it to Macdolena, Magalena, Madgalina, and other monstrosities! ;-(
I still introduce myself as Magdalena but am always prepared to spell it.
In the light of the above, I understand people with names like Katarzyna, Przemysław, Janusz or Marian (which is a man's name in Poland, but a woman's for English speakers), who decide to "change" their name for the sake of convenience.
Mufasa 19 | 357  
3 Nov 2007 /  #63
I don't think Poles are ashamed of their given names, and we don't consider that some names are more or less civilized. We do know, however, that most English, or French or other not smart enough to pronounce those names properly. Therefore, changing the name to sound more, is a gesture Poles make towards language lazy people.

lol lol lol

This was razor sharp.

Just for the record - all other people are not language lazy. When a Polish person introduces themselves with an English name, I always ask for their Polish name. In the beginning, it took a little practice, but as you practice more and more, you kind of develop a feel for pronunciation, and then it's not difficult anymore, so I think the 'language lazy' term is spot on.

:)
telefonitika  
3 Nov 2007 /  #64
xcrital

i found it is because it saves people trying to attempt to pronounce the name mainly within a work environment:)

Like Asia = Joanna
Katarynza = Kasia = Kate

depends on the person really and what they prefer personally
isthatu 3 | 1,164  
3 Nov 2007 /  #65
that most English, or French or other not smart enough

come on,sweeping generalisation there Darius, If people are given a choice between Greg and Grzegorz they will go for Greg, if they are told "This is my name,this is how I pronounce it" they will ,in most cases give it a good go,pronunciation may be a bit clumsy at first but I know very few Poles who speak English without an accent and hence may not say someones name precisely as a native, I dont considor this impolite or some sign of lazieness/stupidity, I just see it as part of the patch work of accents that make up the UK now.

on a tangent(ish) Does it anoy/grate on native Poles when you here the strange pronuntiations given to Polish last names in America/Hollywood,and for that matter the amount of women with mens surnames? ie ,er,Linda Kowalski(pronounced Cow) from croc' dundee?
Dawidusiek  
11 Nov 2007 /  #66
The only time this actually happened to me was when I went to Poland and this girl named Kasia called herself Kate....Other than that it happens with Asians around here all the time, this girl named Hye-Won calls herself Ashley, its really random...
slick77 - | 127  
11 Nov 2007 /  #67
ARE YOU ASHAMED OF YOUR POLISH NAMES?

I am not ashamed of my first name.

Some people decide to change their names for practical reasons. Some names maybe hard to pronounce for the natives. Some people stick with their original names and some people yes change their name because they think it may somehow make them more native.

ARE YOU TRYING TO MAKE IT SOUND MORE... MORE CIVILIZED?

so you consider polish names less civilized or uncivilized? lol
z_darius 14 | 3,965  
11 Nov 2007 /  #68
come on,sweeping generalisation there Darius, If people are given a choice between Greg and Grzegorz they will go for Greg,

I was just kidding there.
Still, sometimes I am surprised at the difficulty people have in pronouncing names. Mine is Dariusz. It confuses the heck out of so many locals here. If I drop the "z" then it makes it kinda easy for them. In the end, I give them just one try and then I suggest they use a name they are most comfortable with, and from then on I react to anything weird that starts with the letter "d" ;)

My wife's name is Agnieszka. As a nurse, she has to wear a name tag so by now she's used to people spending more time trying to read it than it takes them to read an entire sport section in the local paper. Pronouncing it to others doesn't help a whole lot, so she reacts to Agnes (she doesn't like that one), Aggie, Ageeshkah, Agzheeka and a host of other I can't even remember, but they start mostly with "ag"

Funny incident with an East Indian guy who asked me about my wife's name. When I pronounced it he froze for a second and then smiled. In a hindu dialect he spoke (related to Sanskrit) agni-shishka means "trial by fire"
Minka  
12 Nov 2007 /  #69
I live in Poland and It happens the other way round too, my daughter is called Rhea (silent H) and introducing her to polish people never works out well, they cannot hear the Re we get Mia, Tia everything but Rhea, so now we introduce her using her family nickname much easier !
pawellewap - | 5  
24 Nov 2007 /  #70
since i came to england i have been introducing myself with my real name.. english started to be very confused couldn't pronounce that.. tried simplify to pav.. i said 'no worries mate' to make them a bit better. they felt much better.. i don't mind.

pawel (pavew)
sausage 19 | 777  
25 Nov 2007 /  #71
this girl named Kasia called herself Kate

My girlfiend's name, Kasia. Short for Katarzyna. She likes to be called Katie when she is in the UK
krysia 23 | 3,058  
25 Nov 2007 /  #72
My girlfiend's name, Kasia.

My little girl's name is Kasia too. But in US it's Kaitlyn.
sausage 19 | 777  
25 Nov 2007 /  #73
Kaitlyn

Nice name. Hopefully not too much scope for unflattering nicknames at school. KitKat is the best I can manage!
MoldSystem - | 3  
25 Nov 2007 /  #74
go ahead and pronounce Przemysław,
When i introduce myself and hear "HUH??" i just say "forget it".
Thats why everyone knows me by my nickname not my first name.

Lol that made me laugh mate, not in a fun poking kind of way but in a light hearted sense of humour way.

To be honest I don't see the point in the OP!!!

I have not read the whole thread so apologies if this has been covered in a post above but here in the UK WE DON'T ALWAYS USE OUR GIVEN NAME!!!!

William - Billy or Billy, Thomas - Tom, Patricia - Pat and so on.

So what is the original posters point? Was he just looking for an argument or something?
Eurasian 2 | 24  
26 Mar 2009 /  #75
I was just kidding there.
Still, sometimes I am surprised at the difficulty people have in pronouncing names. Mine is Dariusz. It confuses the heck out of so many locals here. If I drop the "z" then it makes it kinda easy for them. In the end, I give them just one try and then I suggest they use a name they are most comfortable with, and from then on I react to anything weird that starts with the letter "d" ;)

Oh my this sounds similar to my problem as well. Im half polish half persian and my parents choose Dariush (Dariusz in Poland) as my name since it is a name that is quite familiar in both Poland and Iran. I live in Canada and most people mispronounce my name and it is really irritating to me. In the english language it is pronounced Dare-eee-osh and to me it sounds rediculous that way. The Polish way of pronouncing Dariusz is much better, sometimes I wish my parents had left out the H in my name =(
espana 17 | 950  
26 Mar 2009 /  #76
you dont see an italian working in a polish restaurant , pretending that he is polish , but sadly you look a lot of polish working in italian restaurant pretending that they are italians.

for a few pounds they can be whatever you want :)
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
26 Mar 2009 /  #77
They do seem to be quite 'flexible' abroad. Marek becomes Marco at the drop of a hat :)
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
26 Mar 2009 /  #78
what is it with adding an 'o' my friend Mariusz changed his to Mario - his real name isn't difficult to pronounce...oh well, maybe he fancied a change :)
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
26 Mar 2009 /  #79
Vowels are quite easy for Polish people to pronounce in Latin-based languages. This is strange as they have so many consonant combos, SZ, CZ, PSZ etc.
Cardno85 31 | 976  
26 Mar 2009 /  #80
Vowels are quite easy for Polish people to pronounce in Latin-based languages.

I'm not sure i agree...people struggled with my name in work (Iain) and it got changed just to Jan instead which isn't much different just removes a syllable
z_darius 14 | 3,965  
26 Mar 2009 /  #81
Oh my this sounds similar to my problem as well. Im half polish half persian and my parents choose Dariush (Dariusz in Poland) as my name since it is a name that is quite familiar in both Poland and Iran. I live in Canada and most people mispronounce my name and it is really irritating to me. In the english language it is pronounced Dare-eee-osh and to me it sounds rediculous that way. The Polish way of pronouncing Dariusz is much better, sometimes I wish my parents had left out the H in my name =(

This is my name too. Polish version.
I found out that if I drop the final 'z' some will pronounce it SOMEWAHT correctly. If I keep the 'z" theya are completely thrown off and after over 20 year in North America I still come across variation in pronunciation that I didn't before.

As for general reasons why Poles change their first name - give them Szczepan or Grzegorz and see what they do with it :)
Rafal_1981  
26 Mar 2009 /  #82
I have noticed that, most of the time, polish people don't use their "real" name when they are out of Poland. For example, Pavel converted into Paul, Bastek = Sebatian, Paulina = Pauline, Basha = Barbara... It's not too difficult to pronounce so...
ARE YOU ASHAMED OF YOUR POLISH NAMES? WHAT'S WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE? ARE YOU TRYING TO MAKE IT SOUND MORE... MORE CIVILIZED?

Basha [Basia] is a diminutive of Polish name Barbara

same goes to Sebastian

If I want my name to sound more 'civilized' I would use Latin not English, heh

BTW: My name is Rafał (I use the same name when abroad)
PolishCowboy 1 | 48  
26 Mar 2009 /  #83
Most westerners can not pronounce Polish names properly, and when they try, they butcher it. Rather than having them learn the proper way to say it; we translate it to the western equivalent and make it easier on them. That doesn't mean that they westerners can't try.
Cardno85 31 | 976  
26 Mar 2009 /  #84
give them Szczepan or Grzegorz and see what they do with it :)

Surely a decent and polite person would learn to pronounce it...
Guest  
26 Mar 2009 /  #85
i wish i had a cool name but im stuck with elizabeth, not very polish but it was more popluar with christians in eastren europe before it was popluar in the rest of the world
Wahldo  
26 Mar 2009 /  #86
stuck with elizabeth

Change it to Elzbieta.. I think that's the Polish equivalent.
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
26 Mar 2009 /  #87
Spot on, Elzbieta is the Polish version
nikttaki 5 | 62  
26 Mar 2009 /  #88
people struggled with my name in work (Iain) and it got changed just to Jan instead which isn't much different just removes a syllable

People at my work do not struggle with my name but.... some of them who dont know me/havent seen me call me by surname when emailing me! Got used to it though :)
Cardno85 31 | 976  
26 Mar 2009 /  #89
So what's your first name then...if it's Nikttaki then where on earth is that from?
nikttaki 5 | 62  
26 Mar 2009 /  #90
Cardno85, nikttaki is my nickname on PF and does not sound like my name whatsoever :)

All I can say is that I am from Venus! :)

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