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Verb patterns 'BYC'


ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
3 Aug 2008 /  #1
Are there any other verbs that share the pattern:
Jestem, Jesteś, Jest, Jestemy, Jestecie, Są ?
benszymanski 8 | 465  
3 Aug 2008 /  #2
No it is a little bit irregular. You will often notice that words used the most often tend to be the most irregular (and not just in Polish)
polishgirltx  
3 Aug 2008 /  #3
ArcticPaul

why do you complicate your life? być:

(1) być; czas teraźniejszy ja jestem, ty jesteś, on/ona/ono jest, my jesteśmy, wy jesteście, oni/one są; czas przeszły ja ~łem/~łam, ty ~łeś/~łaś, on ~ł, ona ~ła, ono ~ło, my ~liśmy/~łyśmy, wy ~liście/~łyście, oni ~li, one ~ły; czas przyszły ja będę, ty będziesz, on/ona/ono będzie, my będziemy, wy będziecie, oni/one będą; tryb rozkazujący bądź, bądźmy, bądźcie; tryb przypuszczający ja ~łbym/~łabym, my ~libyśmy/~łybyście; imiesłów przymiotnikowy będący, -, -; imiesłów przysłówkowy będąc, -

en.wiktionary.org/wiki/by%C4%87

:D:D
OP ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
4 Aug 2008 /  #4
why do you complicate your life?

I'm only trying to familiarise myself with the different verb patterns.....but it is complicated.
Switezianka - | 463  
5 Aug 2008 /  #5
I'm only trying to familiarise myself with the different verb patterns

Here are Polish verb conjugation patterns. Click on 'Conjugation tables' in the right window and have fun! grzegorj.w.interia.pl/gram/gram00.html
OP ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
6 Aug 2008 /  #6
That link has gone straight into my favourites!
Much of it is beyond my level but I'm sure it will provide lots of info for me now and later.
Thanks Switezlanka.
Switezianka - | 463  
6 Aug 2008 /  #7
You're welcome, ArcticPaul. I just love showing people scary things ;-)
Michal - | 1,865  
16 Aug 2008 /  #8
re there any other verbs that share the pattern:
Jestem, Jesteś, Jest, Jestemy, Jestecie, Są ?

Yes, the verb odbyć się follows the same pattern.
HAL9009 2 | 304  
16 Aug 2008 /  #9
LOL as if Polish wasn't complicated enough with just być!
OP ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
29 Nov 2008 /  #10
Thread attached on merging:
Verbs relating to 'TO SEE'.

Oglącać
Patrzeć
Zwiedzać
Widzieć

Can someone please explain the correct usage for each of these verbs?

Examples would be appreciated.
intervigilium - | 9  
29 Nov 2008 /  #11
Widzieć:
1) to see sb or sth by sight
2) to Be able reacting on light, perceive people and things
3) to see a movie, a play etc.
4) to meet with sb
5) to recall or to imagine sb
6) to realize (like "A:Who is she? B:She's my wife A:I see")
7) to think that sb suits a duty or a function

Widzieć się:
1) to see an image of self (like a mirror image)
2) to see each other
3) to meet with sb
4) [colloquially] "Widzi mi się, że...", "Coś mi się widzi, że..." is like english "It seems, that..."
5) [colloquially] to like e.g. "Jak wam się to widzi?" ("How do you like it?")

Zwiedzać:
1) to see a place walking about or traveling

Patrzeć:
1) to look on sth or sb
2) to observe, to eye, to sight

Oglądać:
1) to scrutinize, to contemplate
2) to become acquainted of sth by watching it

Sorry for my rubbish english, but i tried my best ^_^.
Marek 4 | 867  
29 Nov 2008 /  #12
..don't forget also:

Zobaczyć -
1) to see (one time or briefly) e.g. "Do zobaczenia!" = See you later! vs. "Do widzenia!" = So long!, Good bye! (more permanent, more final)

2) to look at

Obejrzeć -
1) to observe, to spy, to glance

etc...
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 Nov 2008 /  #13
Rozumieć, lol. Yes, I see (I understand, lol)

Mieć wizytę, to see a doctor

If we dig deeper, we can find more
OP ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
30 Nov 2008 /  #14
Sorry for my rubbish english, but i tried my best ^_^.

No apology necessary.
Excellent explanation.

Rozumieć and Mieć are 'To understand' and 'To have'.
To include them in a list of verbs relating to 'To see' is a major stretch.

Thread attached on merging:
Polish verbs of motion

I am finding the amount of verbs of motion confusing.

Some you use if it's a specific journey, others for transport, some for walking......

Is there a way to remember when to use jeżdżę and when to use jadę?

When to use chodzę, idę, pójdę.???

If anyone could help explain which to use when (and why) I would be eternally grapefruit.
Marek 4 | 867  
14 Jan 2009 /  #15
Jadę do Warszawy. (codzienne = on a regular basis)

Jeżdźę jutro do Warszwy. (po raz pierwszy = for the first time)

Chodzę do szkoły. (Jestem studentem)

Idę do szkoły. (Spaceruję ku budynku szkolnego)

Pójdę do szkoły. (Będę iść tym razem do szkoły)
osiol 55 | 3,922  
14 Jan 2009 /  #16
Seek perfection with perfectives, or accept imperfection with imperfectives.

My book (no, I didn't write it) states that these "verbs of motion" must (if I could underline in red here, I would definitely underline the word "must") be learnt very carefully. I keep skipping that chapter, but I also keep going back to it.
childwithin 8 | 136  
14 Jan 2009 /  #17
Jadę do Warszawy. (codzienne = on a regular basis)

Jeżdźę jutro do Warszwy. (po raz pierwszy = for the first time)

no, that's not correct, could make sense the other way round, it's difficult to translate these into english, they can change depending on the context
Marek 4 | 867  
14 Jan 2009 /  #18
True, which is why aspects are NOT the same as English tenses-:)
ladykangaroo - | 165  
14 Jan 2009 /  #19
when to use jeżdżę

I drive to Warsaw twice a week (regular basis).
Sometimes, but not very often, it's used for sth you do right now and I would assume that if you use "jeżdżę" you have no particular purpose / reason / destination and you are just driving around.

and when to use jadę?

That's either:
1. "ja jadę teraz" - right now I'm in my car on my way to Warsaw (or train, bus etc)
2. "ja jadę jutro / w niedzielę" - in the future, but once only. I'm going to Warsaw tomorrow / on Sunday.

When to use chodzę, idę, pójdę.???

Starting from the easiest one:
Pójdę - future. Again, only once - I will go for a long walk this evening (not something you usually do).
"Pójdę sobie" may mean "I will go away".

Idę:
1. "ja idę teraz" - At the moment I'm in the park walking.
2. Future, happening again only once: "Ja idę odwiedzić ciocię w ten weekend" - I will go and visit my aunt this weekend.

And "chodzę"....
1. Right now, at the moment: I cannot sleep so I keep walking in my room.
2. On regular basis - "ja chodzę do pracy / szkoły / na jogę" - but it's not exactly the same meaning. Instead of "walking" it's rather "attending".

3. Also: standard regular basis - I go for a walk every morning / Ja chodzę na spacer co rano.
Marek 4 | 867  
14 Jan 2009 /  #20
I think I goofed a bit in my translations of the above verbs. LOL

Sometimes I try to relate the motion verbs with those prefixed verbs in German, e.g. "steigen" vs. "ERsteigen", "BEsteigen" "ANsteigen" etc..

But often they're impossible to render exactly.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
14 Jan 2009 /  #21
Rucham często, how about that for motion? ;)
Melusine 5 | 20  
15 Jan 2009 /  #22
Marek:
Jadę do Warszawy. (codzienne = on a regular basis)

Jeżdźę jutro do Warszwy. (po raz pierwszy = for the first time)

no, that's not correct,

Boy, am I relieved to hear that.
This is precisely what I have been trying to learn for the past week and I'd just about summed it up in my head with the idea that i verbes were for habit so when I saw Marek's post I thought I'd got it all wrong.

I realize that the i thing is an over simplification, but it certainly helps me remember whether I should be using chodzić / jeźdić, or iść / jechać
Marek 4 | 867  
15 Jan 2009 /  #23
A thousand apologies if my post was erroneous in any way.-:) I merely was paraphrasing what I remembered. Seems though I remembered wrong in this case. LOL
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098  
15 Jan 2009 /  #24
Is there a way to remember when to use jeżdżę and when to use jadę?

- regular activity, each day you are going to work, by what, by bus/car/tram
Jeżdzę do pracy autobusem.
Jeżdzę do pracy samochodem.
Jeżdzę do pracy tramwajem.

- activity at the moment
Jadę do pracy.
Jade do lekarza.
Jadę do sklepu.

When to use chodzę, idę, pójdę.???

- regular activity
Chodzę do szkoły.
Chodzę do pracy.
Chodzę na angielski.
Chodzę na karate.

- activity at the moment
Idę do pracy.
Idę do lekarza.
Idę do sklepu.

- activity in the future, intention
Jutro pojdę do lekarza.
Jutro pójdę do banku.
Jutro pójdę do fryzjera.
We czwartek pójdę na ryby.
loco polaco 3 | 353  
15 Jan 2009 /  #25
Rucham często, how about that for motion? ;)

lol.. that is the exact translation for motion and that is what i thought of too.

(Spaceruję ku budynku szkolnego)

no ku. very, very old polish; also russian. not in use today.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
15 Jan 2009 /  #26
no ku. very, very old polish; also russian. not in use today.

Where's Michal3 when you (don't) need him?

Ja ku sklepu.
benszymanski 8 | 465  
15 Jan 2009 /  #27
Disclaimer - I've just had a couple of beers so what I write might not appear as logical as it is in my head, but here goes:

The reason verbs of motion are tricky is that in addition to the regular perfective and imperfective there is a 3rd form. Basically imperfective is split into 'determinate' and 'indeterminate'.

For example with the verb "to go" you have the 3 forms as follows:

perfective - pojść (pojdę...)
imperfective determinate - iść (idę, idziesz, ...)
imperfective indeterminate - chodzić (chodzę ...)

Now you already know when to use the perfective so I won't go into that. The difference between determinate and indeterminate is whether you are referring to specific activities or general activities. For example:

Idę do szkoła - I am going to school (i.e. right now I am walking to school)
Chodzę do szkoła - I go to school (i.e. this is a habit, a generalisation, I am not doing this right now)

Another example with the verb "to fly":
Ona poleci jutro do londynu - she will fly to London tomorrow [perfective]
Ona leci do krakowa - she is flying to Krakow (right now) [determinate]
Ona cała czas lata - her feet never touch the ground (literally "she flies the whole time" with a general, habitual aspect) [indeterminate]

Does that make sense?
OP ArcticPaul 38 | 233  
15 Jan 2009 /  #28
Does that make sense?

Yes.

I'd like more examples, with explanations (like above) because it is clear, concise and very informative.
Thanks.
loco polaco 3 | 353  
15 Jan 2009 /  #29
Some you use if it's a specific journey, others for transport, some for walking......

just like english, no?

walking, driving, flying, traveling...

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