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Things Polish people who speak English language say


JustysiaS 13 | 2,240  
24 Apr 2008 /  #121
i know a Polish guy who teaches some Poles how to use an "english accent", but what he teaches them is actually the worst impression of it. he is a nice guy when i speak to him in Polish, but when he puts on that weird accent and sounds all smutty and condescending, nobody speaks to him unless they have to!
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Apr 2008 /  #122
Hehehe!! There are those types. At least it gives u a laugh tho
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240  
24 Apr 2008 /  #123
oh yes, it is funny in a way, how confident about his skills he is... he starts stuttering when more than one person actually pays attention to what he says, a bit like stage-fright, then i help him out ;). but he does sound like an english-wannabe snob. i sound like a sexy polish girl lol (unless im in scotland, then they say i sound english haha)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Apr 2008 /  #124
Many Scottish folk don't know where I'm from either, it's true :(
plk123 8 | 4,150  
24 Apr 2008 /  #125
are London bus drivers gay

This is an old London saying and he didnt understand it.

or maybe he did.. gay does = happy after all.

"pron"?

rearrange 2 and 3 letters but i don't know if that's what they ment
Jenni - | 19  
24 Apr 2008 /  #126
can't and c*nt...

This reminds me of a kinda similar pronunciation type situation..... coke and c*ck !! Sometimes i just have to laugh when my boyfriend asks me if i want some "c*ck" *blush* !! He's very innocent and sweet so its extra funny :-P Also - 'want' and 'won't'...
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
24 Apr 2008 /  #127
Can't fault the man for trying, ;)
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240  
24 Apr 2008 /  #128
my (English) friend offered to buy my sister a drink and she asked for a vodka and cock... good choice haha
sapphire 22 | 1,241  
25 Apr 2008 /  #129
for a vodka and cock..

sounds perfect.
osiol 55 | 3,922  
25 Apr 2008 /  #130
I ought to mention a newly released English word, invented by a Polish person.
Following on in a natural progression from somewhat, somehow, somewhere:

S O M E W H E N

This word was invented somewhy, I suppose.

my (English) friend offered to buy my sister a drink and she asked for

I'd like to hear the Polish bartender saying "Sorry, you can't have Coke."
F15guy 1 | 160  
25 Apr 2008 /  #131
Osiol: newly released English word, invented by a Polish person....Somewhen

Somewhen I will find a way to use that new word. Great word.
Dice 15 | 452  
25 Apr 2008 /  #132
I ought to mention a newly released English word, invented by a Polish person.
S O M E W H E N

There is another newly released English word invented I believe right here on PF:
P O L O N O P H O B I A
;0
osiol 55 | 3,922  
25 Apr 2008 /  #133
P O L O N O P H O B I A

A useful concept to understand if you're studying Polonology.

I've just worked out that it should be Poloniophobia / Poloniology / Poloniophonic / Polonistics...
Wroclaw Boy  
25 Apr 2008 /  #134
I've just worked out that it should be Poloniophobia / Poloniology / Poloniophonic / Polonistics...

Thats fubar
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
25 Apr 2008 /  #135
There is another newly released English word invented I believe right here on PF: P O L O N O P H O B I A

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Polish_sentiment

Polonistics..

Strangely, there is a word polonistyka in Polish - a study of Polish language and literature. There is anglistyka, germanistyka etc.
Dice 15 | 452  
25 Apr 2008 /  #136
Z_Darius, the word "polonophobia" does not exist in English.
Try to find it in any legitimate English dictionary:

Marriam_Webster Online:

"Polonophobia":

The word you've entered isn't in the dictionary. Click on a spelling suggestion below or try again using the search bar above.

Eurola 4 | 1,906  
25 Apr 2008 /  #137
Dice, I agree. I never heard the word.
Wikipedia is always edited by people, but it is not the official dictionary I would look up to. Even when you Google..1st - Wikipedia...then..guess what 'polishforums'. LOL.
fletcher969 - | 1  
26 Apr 2008 /  #138
I have a few funny words/phrases a Polish female friend of mine has blurted out. She's actually quite adept at English, but she occasionally pulls some good ones, mostly due to rote errors. There are tons more, but these are the ones I can recall at the moment...

1. "I better don't"...instead of "I better not."
2. "Cheese cream"...instead of "cream cheese."
3. "Railhand"...instead of "handrail."
4. "Tripad"...instead of "tripod."
5. "Noozle"...instead of "nozzle." (she still confuses this one)
6. "Dripping"...instead of "raining."
7. "Rejigitated"...instead of "regurgitated."
8. "Wing simulator"...instead of "flight simulator."
9. "Funny elbow"...instead of "funny bone."
10. "In the flashlight"...instead of "in the spotlight."
11. "Ear muffins"...instead of "ear muffs."

And then there are simple "logic" errors, of which there are many (being a guy I might suggest it's a gender thing) ;) but this is the only one I can recall at the moment...

"I remember something, but I forgot what it was!" LOL!!!
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
26 Apr 2008 /  #139
Z_Darius, the word "polonophobia" does not exist in English.

Dice, I agree. I never heard the word.

Edited by David L. Ransel and Bozena Shallcross. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2005. 218 pages. ISBN 0253217717. Hardcover $50.00, paper $22.95.

This collection of essays is based on a series of papers originally presented at the conference “Polonophilia and Polonophobia of the Russians,” held on the campus of Indiana University in September 2000.


Polonophilia and Polonophobia are words following a certain pattern, used for creating words, so they can't be considered as non existing, they are simply rarely used.
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
26 Apr 2008 /  #140
Z_Darius, the word "polonophobia" does not exist in English.
Try to find it in any legitimate English dictionary:

You may be surprised to learn that dictionaries authors do not invent words. They include them (or not) as the usage gets recognition. It amy also come as a surprise to you that dozens of phobias are not listed in webster's, even though have have been legitimated psychological conditions dealt with by English speaking clinical psychologists for decades.

A little exercise for you; try to find tyrannosaurus rex in webster's. Virtually every teenager knows the meaning, but the the tyrannosaurus rex is not in webster's.

Krzysztof's post explains that for you.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Apr 2008 /  #141
The difference between the present simple and the present progressive/continuous also causes problems, e.g I'm coming from the west of Poland, rather than I come from the west of Poland.

Native speakers are complicating things by saying stuff like, 'I'm lovin it', although it has some logic
osiol 55 | 3,922  
27 Apr 2008 /  #142
Native speakers are complicating things

I'm never doing that.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Apr 2008 /  #143
You are always do that ;)
osiol 55 | 3,922  
27 Apr 2008 /  #144
There are tons more, but these are the ones I can recall at the moment

Try to remember more please.

You are always do that

I doing what?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Apr 2008 /  #145
You have done it yesterday too, LOL
RubasznyRumcajs 5 | 488  
6 May 2008 /  #146
"I remember something, but I forgot what it was!" LOL!!!

it sounds perfectly OK for me

:>
sol 1 | 2  
15 Jul 2009 /  #147
What are some common errors that Polish people make when learning to speak English? Perhaps this can give me more of an insight as to the differences between the two languages.
plk123 8 | 4,150  
15 Jul 2009 /  #148
i'd search around the forums as there is at least one other thread with this very title.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
15 Jul 2009 /  #150
Polish people can't say "is". they say "ees"
All words ending with "ing" are pronounce "ink". Example: "What are you doink?"
Sometimes the accent is placed on the wrong syllable: Example 3 syllable words: "Madison" Poles usually place the accent on the second from last syllable so it sounds like "Madeeson" instead of "Madison"

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