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Posts by Magdalena  

Joined: 15 Aug 2007 / Female ♀
Last Post: 27 Mar 2015
Threads: Total: 3 / In This Archive: 0
Posts: Total: 1835 / In This Archive: 310
From: North Sea coast, UK
Speaks Polish?: Yes
Interests: Reading, writing, listening, talking

Displayed posts: 310 / page 11 of 11
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Magdalena   
20 Dec 2009
UK, Ireland / Its strange that there arent many Poles who live in the UK on this Forum [102]

they made it hell and my English friend who was going to help me get my stuff out was threatened that if he steps into the house they will beat up both him and me. and they meant it. i've been through a lot of crap in my life but this definitely took the biscuit.

OMG what sort of people were they?! I've known a few idiots in my time, but what you describe here is almost too good to be true ;-)
Magdalena   
20 Dec 2009
UK, Ireland / Its strange that there arent many Poles who live in the UK on this Forum [102]

so even if he chucked his load in on a quick wash, they made a point of stopping it, taking his wet half washed clothes out and sticking a few of their garments in that weren't exactly dirty :)

I know this is totally off topic, but can't resist. I have had this happen to me, and a friend of mine in a different house-share, in this case the flatmates were definitely NOT of the Polish persuasion - so this I guess would be more of an international trick ;-) I'm SO glad to be living independently now! Overall I think the very idea of sharing a house or flat beyond a certain age (like when people are still studying) is sick and wrong, and really brings out the absolutely worst in people. I sometimes thought I could murder certain individuals for the things they'd done! Ranging from using my kitchen utensils to throwing my freshly washed and dried laundry on the dirty floor so they could hang up theirs :-(((
Magdalena   
21 Dec 2009
Law / Polish Govt website for foreigners, marriage, family, etc. (in PL and EN) [19]

if the UK government printed advice like that.

one last time: it's NOT government advice. It's information about what people think, taken from a survey. Actually, I think this is a brilliant approach: you not only tell the prospective bride or groom from another country what the legal requirements are, you also show them what the "natives" tend to think on the subject, and what the expectations might be. If people getting married to foreigners always took this into consideration, there might be fewer divorces on the grounds of "cultural incompatibility" later on.
Magdalena   
21 Dec 2009
Law / Polish Govt website for foreigners, marriage, family, etc. (in PL and EN) [19]

I cannot imagine any sane women agreeing to what was written.

Well sorry to rain on your parade, I am an independent, emancipated woman, and I see nothing wrong in publishing the results of this survey. I can agree with quite a lot of the statements as well. I see nothing wrong in a traditional marriage with gender roles set out clearly; heck, I would love to be a dutiful housewife who doesn't have to worry about where the next pay-check is coming from! I could then pursue other interests such as trolling on the internet, watercolour painting, writing poetry, and going shopping for nice clothes and stuff with my lady friends :-)
Magdalena   
21 Dec 2009
Law / Polish Govt website for foreigners, marriage, family, etc. (in PL and EN) [19]

I take it you are still single.

No, I am not. I have also always worked very hard professionally, AND done the housework etcetera.

And before you get all feminist on me, please do care to read the following excerpt from the same site and same survey results:

"On the other hand, a good husband will earn money and, consequently, provide for his family and wife, and ensure their security (he is supposed to take care of the amount, continuity, and stability of income, and life with no financial worries)."

The people who attacked the first part of the statement, about a woman being "a ray of sunshine" for the husband and family, smoothing pillows and dusting and cooking, should really spare a thought for the poor, exploited man in this hypothetical relationship. If there is slavery in Poland still, the guy's situation fits the description much better than the woman's ;-p
Magdalena   
21 Dec 2009
Law / Polish Govt website for foreigners, marriage, family, etc. (in PL and EN) [19]

As women here during communism were seen as part of the work force and now it is a kind of return to traditional values, family and church. Whereas in Ireland, they were cooking, cleaning, baby makers, not that that is so bad but it became very unpopular and even rejected on masse.

Spot on.
Magdalena   
23 Dec 2009
Life / Regional traits in Poland [27]

Morava Czechs

Both the Moravians and the Czechs would like to have a word with you outside... ;-P
Magdalena   
23 Dec 2009
Life / Regional traits in Poland [27]

What do you mean?

I only meant that, though they remain in rather friendly relations, Czechs are not Moravian and Moravians are not Czech :-)
I quite liked your "Morava Czechs" contraction ;-)
Two birds with one stone, as the saying goes...
Magdalena   
26 Dec 2009
Language / Do you think there is something like Warsaw accent ? [29]

Good example of it was different pronunciation of "ch" in Lech and Ruch.
Personally I'm unable to notice any difference at all.

Because there isn't any. The only "difference" I can think of is a possibility of retro-voicing the "ch" sound in Lech (as in "Leh") due to the character of the preceding vowel, but such pronunciation would be considered slovenly and substandard.

Nevertheless, the spelling clearly shows that both Lech and Ruch should have an unvoiced "ch".