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Stolen hero of the forgotten war.


Sasha 2 | 1,083  
11 Apr 2009 /  #31
Democracy is non-existant, but this is only half of the problem.

Democracy doesn't exist in Ukraine either. Secondly what does it give you as to the citizen of different country or you just prefer to bluntly manipulate with learnt by heart slogans from the media? It doesn't sound smart you know. So please tell me how undemocratic regime of Russia (the thought I thoroughly share separately) affects you? This affects me as a citizen in terms of non-working law, but you...

Its foreign policy is as outrageous as US'

You're overestimating things. We don't kill people on their own land, we don't use nuclear weapon, we don't dictate to other countries the rules of living their lives we don't impose on others our model of "democracy"... yet. Maybe because we are weak so far.

What about Georgia?

yes...what about Georgia?
Nathan 18 | 1,363  
11 Apr 2009 /  #32
Democracy doesn't exist in Ukraine either.

You can say virtually whatever you want, print whatever you like without fear. It is not perfect, I agree, but I can say that my president is an assho** and I wouldn't end up tortured or imprisoned like will be the case with Russia. I listened to politicians from Russia saying in Ukranian media that we are so lucky being able to express our thoughts freely compared to the situation of free speech in Russia.

So please tell me how undemocratic regime of Russia (the thought I thoroughly share separately) affects you?

Sasha, it affects me as a neighbor of your country. The more democratic and open your country is, the less painful our economic and political relations are. And politics and economy affects me as well. Don't you think that it is not ok to hear Putin, Luzhkov and other hard balls of your politics constantly disturbing Ukrainian inner politics, coming over and claiming lands, "saving Russians who are under threat" etc.? Does it affect me? Of course it does.

We don't kill people on their own land

And Chechens? And what is the deal with Abkhasia region of Georgia? When there is one Russian in a foreign country and his rights are "threatened" (give me a break), you immediately put everything up side down.
Filios1 8 | 1,336  
11 Apr 2009 /  #33
Long live Russian-Ukrainian brotherhood!
freebird 3 | 532  
11 Apr 2009 /  #34
long live all humans brotherhood sounds much better
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
11 Apr 2009 /  #35
I agree. This should be a natural kind of brotherhood. Is there really a need for Ukraine to join NATO? Nathan, that question is first and foremost for you.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259  
11 Apr 2009 /  #36
but I can say that my president is an assho** and I wouldn't end up tortured or imprisoned

To Nathan: We can say that your president is an ass°°le also! Nobody will torture us for this.
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
11 Apr 2009 /  #37
and I wouldn't end up tortured or imprisoned like will be the case with Russia.

Think I'm still alive as well.

I listened to politicians from Russia saying in Ukranian media that we are so lucky being able to express our thoughts freely compared to the situation of free speech in Russia.

Can easily be. The problem is that we don't have honest enough politicians in Russia. They're all either progovernmental or poor attempts on being an opposition. Second ones I suspect you read. You may express your views in media but this way you'll defenetely lose the cushy place. It's not a problem with the freedom of speech, it's a problem of mentality of some people that still needs some time to be changed. For instance journalists like Pozner or Svanidze initially being anticommunistic and antitotalitarian are now bought from top to toe. They need money more than truth.

Sasha, it affects me as a neighbor of your country. The more democratic and open your country is, the less painful our economic and political relations are. And politics and economy affects me as well. Don't you think that it is not ok to hear Putin, Luzhkov and other hard balls of your politics constantly disturbing Ukrainian inner politics, coming over and claiming lands, "saving Russians who are under threat" etc.? Does it affect me? Of course it does.

I believe there're more your own problems, problems of your own policy in what you said. Juschenko could have been more flexible in his diplomacy but he didn't want to as he needed conflict with current Russia as an air to breath. If the government can't provide its citizens with the better wellfare, it looks for an excuse. Russia is a brilliant excuse for disability of your government.

And Chechens? And what is the deal with Abkhasia region of Georgia? When there is one Russian in a foreign country and his rights are "threatened" (give me a break), you immediately put everything up side down.

I can say a lot on this topic... so much that I don't even know what I should begin with. At the same time I don't want to be understood wrong way. Chechnia and most of people raised there are merely beast. If I were putin, I would let them go and (or) even gove a money so that they won't ever step on my land. Sometimes it seemed to me that they only knew on how to rob and kill, nothing more and the hatred towards Russians they adopted with the first sips of mother's milk.

The ammount of Russians missed there (not in action... just missed) or killed there is just incomparable with those Chechens who were killed in those two compaigns. Basically nothing has changed since that time... they still hate us and Russian minority there feel oppressed all the time. I would let them go... I wouldn't wish such a neighbour even to my enemy.

Long live Russian-Ukrainian brotherhood!

Thanks Filios. :) I would include Poles in this list too or maybe even better second this phrase:

long live all humans brotherhood sounds much better

rock - | 460  
11 Apr 2009 /  #38
I guess Germans and Poles will never agree as far as Copernicus :-)

If you ask a Turk, he/she will say Copernicus is Polish.
Filios1 8 | 1,336  
11 Apr 2009 /  #39
Thanks Filios. :) I would include Poles in this list too

This is better, how about..

LONG LIVE SLAVIJA! ; )

If you ask a Turk, he/she will say Copernicus is Polish

Naturally ;)

But why is that, rock?
freebird 3 | 532  
11 Apr 2009 /  #40
If you ask a Turk,

if you ask A Turk....you probably right about that :-)
It would be interesting to go back in time and ask Copernicus how feels about it, lol.
In general a person is whoever it believes to be. For example if you're born in Turkey but your father is from Germany and your mother from Italy, how can we tell who you are? I guess it's up to you to make that decision.
Nathan 18 | 1,363  
11 Apr 2009 /  #41
Let's call him Earthian.

Chechnia and most of people raised there are merely beast

they still hate us and Russian minority there feel oppressed all the time.

Do you think this hatred is not based on historical and political factors. In 1840s Russia conquered this territory killing people, suppresing culture and language. Do you think it is that easy to forget, especially when they declared independance and where bombarded in 1990s. Any agressor is being hated, this is as natural as mother's milk you are talking about.

disability of your government

I wouldn't disagree on disability, but Russia-wise and inflexibility was a good choice.

but I can say that my president is an assho** and I wouldn't end up tortured or imprisoned

When you are in a bathroom with a pillow in your mouth. Yes, I know.

To Nathan: We can say that your president is an ass°°le also! Nobody will torture us for this.

Of course, in Russia you may even become a mayor of Moskow for that or NATO representative of Russia. I think you should do it more often, it is a well-paid job.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259  
11 Apr 2009 /  #42
Anyway Nathan, you absolutely deserve the president you have. Let's wait five years and you will see the fruits of his presidency. Wellcome to Russian dominion!
OP Borrka 37 | 594  
12 Apr 2009 /  #43
Oh c'mon Kostik...
In 5 years there is no Russia at all given your successful economy today LOL.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
12 Apr 2009 /  #44
I think Russia has the resources to sustain itself for quite some time yet. Natural gas is gonna be needed for quite some time yet. Also, Russia has important deals with other countries like Iran and Venezuela.

Still, CK, what is Russia gonna do to stimulate things on the domestic front? It is ailing at present and the ruble is becoming an insignificant currency.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259  
12 Apr 2009 /  #45
We should persuade the world to buy more Russian goods. I know, I know that their quality often is not very high, but it is not important. Cast a glance at Borrka. Certainly he wouldn't buy our goods under normal circumstances, but we can ask him to buy... What you will do Seanus, for example, if once in the morning you will be told by TV that Russian army is quartering not far from Newcastle?
OP Borrka 37 | 594  
12 Apr 2009 /  #46
Cast a glance at Borrka. Certainly he wouldn't buy our goods under normal circumstances, but we can ask him to buy...

I've got the drift but now seriously...

Dear Kostik, if everybody spends at least 10% of what I'm spending for "made in Russia" goods, soon you're nummero uno in exports worldwide.

It depends on the quality only:
Russian folk and pop CDs, Russian movies, Russian books and software plus vodka are second to none.
I even tried Russian balalayka but it's broken now.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259  
12 Apr 2009 /  #47
You should wear Russian, eat Russian, drive Russian
freebird 3 | 532  
12 Apr 2009 /  #48
Let's call him Earthian.

I like this idea, :-)
Nathan 18 | 1,363  
12 Apr 2009 /  #49
I just what to pinpoint an important thing: Russians spent half a billion of their currency and three years of work, thousands actors involved just to depict a historical moment of Ukrainian and Polish confrontation + put words of ass-licking into Cossacks' mouths. It is not their history, but they spend so much in order to do their "job". Now, if they waste so much money on cultural front, can you imagine what they do on political and economical plains? They throw billions to influence thoughts, to bribe politicians, to undermine countries in the eyes of others, to bring hostility among nations etc.

I am hoping US movie industry makes a movie about Iraq and Iran and their confrontation and then at the end Iraqis will yell: "US is our only savior and tsar. Come, O America, our king!" What a nice movie! I bet they will also spend billions on it like Russians.
freebird 3 | 532  
12 Apr 2009 /  #50
I am hoping US movie industry makes a movie

I hope they won't. There;s more important things at the moment to spend money on.
Nathan 18 | 1,363  
12 Apr 2009 /  #51
I was sarcastically joking, Freebird, just to make my point. :)
OP Borrka 37 | 594  
12 Apr 2009 /  #52
Russians spent half a billion of their currency and three years of work, thousands actors involved just to depict a historical moment of Ukrainian and Polish confrontation + put words of ass-licking into Cossacks' mouths. It is not their history, but they spend so much in order to do their "job".

Exactly my message.
Point.


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