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Any TEFL teachers in Poland out there?


Keatsgray 7 | 5
12 Jul 2007 #1
I am really "topic" happy. I have really been helped out a lot on this site! I just wanted to see if there are any teachers of English as a foreign language on this site. I'd like to contact them - just find out some information. I know there are TEFL sites, but I've had good help from this site. I figured I'd stick with it. reidii@adelphia.net

Thanks again...
i_love_detroit 1 | 69
12 Jul 2007 #2
I am actually ESL teacher, but withiout any experience, but I have finished CELTA course in Canada... Maybe I can help you?
scottie1113 7 | 898
12 Jul 2007 #3
Not yet but I'm taking my CELTA in Warsaw next month then it's off to Gdansk to find a job.
nauczyciel
12 Jul 2007 #4
i'd really suggest that u go to Dave's ESL Cafe and find the Poland Forum for loads of info on teaching in Poland.
Hutnik - | 8
12 Jul 2007 #5
The url for Dave's ESL cafe for teachers in Poland:
Michal - | 1,865
13 Jul 2007 #6
Dave's ESL Cafe is very good for all around the world and even has separate areas for China and South Korea. I would have thought Warsaw would be better for looking for jobs as it would have more language schools though I do know that Poland is a popular destination for new teachers of English-it might be that standards are lower as South Korea and Turkey only accept university graduates but CELTA qualified teachers are welcome in Eastern Europe.

CELTA in Warsaw next month then it's off to Gdansk to find a job.

I have a Trinity Certificate that I have never used-have mine for free! I honestly do not think that they are worth the money. Can I ask you, how much is it to do the course now?
beckski 12 | 1,617
13 Jul 2007 #7
I have a Trinity Certificate that I have never used-have mine for free

Within the state of California, substitute teachers in the past were only required to possess a CBEST certificate. They're now required to obtain a bachelor's degree, in addition to the certificate.

I just wanted to see if there are any teachers of English as a foreign language on this site.

Hello Keatsgray,

I've been thinking about obtaining a teaching credential, in Elementary School education.
My goal is to teach EL students, within the state of California. My family members consist of a long line of school teachers. I suppose teaching in my blood.

I wish you success, in achieving and demonstrating your educational teaching skills in Poland.
Michal - | 1,865
14 Jul 2007 #9
I do not know anything about you past education but it could be well worth your while trying to get a job even now because as a native speaker, I am sure that most schools would 'welcone you with open arms'.
scottie1113 7 | 898
14 Jul 2007 #10
CELTA at Bell in Warsaw is 4990 zl plus 1000 zl for a studio flat near the school for the month. Not bad, I think. I have an American friend in Gdansk who has been teaching there for four years. He tells me that he has interviewed with a number of schools during the school year and they all told him him that if he had his CELTA they would hire him on the spot. Sounds promising, but I'll find out for sure when I get there in early September.
Michal - | 1,865
14 Jul 2007 #11
Yes, I am sure that you will have no trouble finding work. Many years ago I was in Krasnik, near or at least not that very far from Czestochowa. I met the librarian there who in turn introduced me to the Russian girl who had been hired by the school to teach English. She was from Kiyiew if I remember rightly and her English was very average to say the least. I do not think she earned much money as the State System did not pay much in those days. Schools in the area lacked teachers and openly recruited from the Former Soviet Union to fill the spaces. This would be around 1994'ish so things might have changed since. As far as I know Poland is still rather a 'third world country' and will take on any applicant. I remember how TheKrug on this forum stated that his school even has a native Brazilian as a native Englishman!

4990 zl plus 1000 zl for a studio flat near

4990 zl plus 1000 zl for a studio flat near the school for the month. Not bad,

Does that mean you pay for the flat or that the school supplies 1000zl per month towards youraccommodation? I ask as I knew someone once who worked in Warsaw for Target. I do not know if they still exist but he was promised accommodation and it turned out to be a settee in someone's living room!
OP Keatsgray 7 | 5
14 Jul 2007 #12
I was able to get a position teaching 25 hours a week - flat is included -I have to pay all utilities though. The job is in Elblag and the pay is 3,000 zl. Honest opinions. A pretty good gig?
nauczyciel
15 Jul 2007 #13
is the pay 3000zl net or gross?? i asked u this question already in you other thread.

expect to pay another 200-300zl/month for utilities.

expect another 250-750zl/month in deductions.

i can't tell u if it is a good gig. what method? how much work (marking,giving re-tests) will u be doing on your own time and for no renumeration?
scottie1113 7 | 898
15 Jul 2007 #14
It means I will pay 1000zl plus 200zl for utilities etc for the flat and a total of 4990zl for the CELTA. I have a friend in Warsaw who took the CELTA from Bell four years ago. He knows the flat and said it's decent and he also said the price was fair.

I'll be there in 3 1/2 weeks.
Michal - | 1,865
16 Jul 2007 #15
How much money is that in English currency. I did a TESOL in Guildford in 2000 and it cost me £520 but probably cost more now with inflation.
nauczyciel
16 Jul 2007 #16
how about going online (as you are already here) and go to a currency converter website??

x6 approx
Michal - | 1,865
16 Jul 2007 #17
I am not very good at maths-my education is a bit limited though I do remember when there were 10,000 zl notes a long time ago. I expect you mean divide by 6.
scottie1113 7 | 898
16 Jul 2007 #18
I sent a 300zl deposit when it was 3 zl to the US dollar, so US $100. Today it is 2.75zl to the dollar so that is $1490. I Google currency exchange rates and find out the daily rates. I didn't convert zl to Euros or punds so you'll have to do that yourself. I'm not interested in what a pound is worth as it will be a while before I decide if I want to visit England. All I care about is being in Poland in three weeks no matter what the exchange rate is at that time. And since I'll be paid in zl it won't really matter for a while.

Keatsgray, my teacher friends in Warsaw and Gdansk told me that 3000zl gross plus free accomodations is pretty good. They augment that with private lessons but don't count on the income because they say it can be sketchy at times. I guess I'll find that out for myself pretty soon. And good luck to you!
Michal - | 1,865
17 Jul 2007 #19
It does not sound a bad price for the course at today's rates. Mind you, you may be banned from giving private lessons. Watch your contract1 years ago, I was in Czestochowa and teachers at a particular school were not allowed to give private tuition, I suppose that the school was afraid that teachers would poach students from the school.
scottie1113 7 | 898
17 Jul 2007 #20
Good advice Michal. EMPIK and a few other schools I would work for do not do that. In addition to working for a school I want to teach business English so I will contact some companies in Gdansk.

And believe me, the CELTA in Poland including air fare and a flat is much cheaper than in the US, plus I'll be in Poland so I can work on my language skills while I'm there.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
17 Jul 2007 #21
there were 10,000 zl notes a long time ago.

The zloty was changed about 15 years ago.

The zloty is now about 5.65zl to the pound.
Michal - | 1,865
18 Jul 2007 #22
he zloty was changed about 15 years ago.

Sorry, I am just showing my age. Actually, somewhere, I have still got some old tram tickets, unused, but they are written in old prices from Krakow. I wonder if I could still use them even though they are twenty two years old?!
bossie 1 | 123
18 Jul 2007 #23
I guess many people have the old notes, price tags on books, bus tickets ect. After the Italian currency (the lira) it was probably worth least...
delta4ce1 - | 1
19 Jul 2010 #24
I have two degrees in education and many years of teaching and training experience. The TEFL, TOEFL, and other such English as a Second Language certifications are a joke and an insult to those of us who really spent the time and tons of money getting teacher certified. These other certifications are minimal at best, cost two or three hundred dollars for a few weeks study and are simply a way of giving the down and out a way of getting a job and a way for the language learning industry to make a lot of money quick. They are a sad joke. How they ever became recognized as a preferred certification has to be found in the "good ole boy" system of corruption that the Chinese call guanxi. I've worked with many teachers with such minimal certification and they don't have a clue to what's really going on or why or how people best learn language. They are nothing more than facilitators passing on what they've been told and using methods with virtually no understanding about how real education has to take place.
Get-A-LifeLoser
21 Mar 2011 #25
I have two degrees in education and many years of teaching and training experience. The TEFL, TOEFL, and other such English as a Second Language certifications are a joke and an insult to those of us who really spent the time and tons of money getting teacher certified. These other certifications are minimal at best, cost two or three hundred dollars for a few weeks study and are simply a way of giving the down and out a way of getting a job and a way for the language learning industry to make a lot of money quick. They are a sad joke. How they ever became recognized as a preferred certification has to be found in the "good ole boy" system of corruption that the Chinese call guanxi. I've worked with many teachers with such minimal certification and they don't have a clue to what's really going on or why or how people best learn language. They are nothing more than facilitators passing on what they've been told and using methods with virtually no understanding about how real education has to take place.

I am making reference to the last post above.

You may be a teacher but obviously an angry and foolish one. I have been stood in front of a lot of so called 'quality teachers' with degrees and many ugly years of face to face teaching. Everyone in society deserves a standing within society and I have to say that in every country that these TEFL/CELTA teaching practices are happening it seems to be most welcomed. Have you thought about the youth of our day providing to some of these very unpleasant living conditions? They are bringing to many primitive villages a wealth of information and allowing these people to learn to use the English language. Hopefully one day this will give one of their students the chance to make something of themselves in this somewhat extremely dominated English-Speaking world!

I am not a Teacher, instead I am a longstanding Paramedic of many and I can tell you right now had it now been for all those people who have learnt first aid and got there 'before me' the outcome may not have been a positive one! Could you imagine how you would feel if you took the time to assist an injured/ill person and I turned up and told you to "step aside your not qualified to tell me what you witnessed, fixed or were trying to tell me"? But alas, you know what instead of brushing you aside I would be saying "thank you and listening to what you witnessed, how you assisted and what worked how up until now"...I would be an idiot, dont you think if these first aiders were not out there helping? The disasters world wide at present shows great feats by those of little knowledge doing GREAT saves!

Lighten up 'Teach' (Coach) and see that these courses do hold a very special position in many peoples lives and you know what, it might not be University and the pay and living conditions 'crap' but the smiles on the student faces when the 'get it' is worth so much more. Maybe its time for you to reflect on who you are and where you are at - might be time for a career change! Now get off your soapbox and back into the classroom.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
21 Mar 2011 #26
I've worked with many teachers with such minimal certification and they don't have a clue to what's really going on or why or how people best learn language.

You may have a point, but I've experienced more than a few "real" teachers who were similar. Likewise, I've heard the whine of teachers that they can't teach classes full of mixed-language learners. Well, that's what a lot of TEFL people have to do.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
21 Mar 2011 #27
Likewise, I've heard the whine of teachers that they can't teach classes full of mixed-language learners. Well, that's what a lot of TEFL people have to do.

I'm always impressed by people that can - I can't imagine teaching a group of mixed language learners at all.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,872
21 Mar 2011 #28
. The TEFL, TOEFL, and other such English as a Second Language certifications are a joke and an insult to those of us who really spent the time and tons of money getting teacher certified.

TOEFL is actually a test of English as a Foreign language favoured by U.S. universities, not a teaching certificate. I would have thought that with your wealth of knowledge and experience you would have known that.

CTEFLA/CELTA are not a "joke" they are certified entry level qualifications. Many schools like newly qualified people for their enthusiasm........(doesn't sound like you have much)

You're right there are alot of newly qualified teachers who are a bit rubbish, but there are also many old teachers who are just sour and embittered and set in their ways and are not prepared to reflect or develop..:)


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