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Teaching in public school VS private school in Poland


Sergiusz 6 | 22    
10 Jan 2019  #1
I noticed that private language schools usually offer a different type of contract (umowa zlecenia) which does not have as many benefits as a regular work contract (umowa o pracę). Any body here who has experience in public school sector and can compare it to teaching in private schools? Workload, accommodations for foreign teachers, legal status support, other benefits?
Lyzko 19 | 5,777    
10 Jan 2019  #2
There was an article in last week's Polish daily here in New Jersey concerning the massive protests throughout the country aka Poland because teachers, other civil servants were advised that they may suffer drastic pension cuts. Sure it must have been all over the Polish press as well.
Nathans    
11 Jan 2019  #3
The best for a worker is to get a real full-term work contact (umowa o pracę). Umowa zlecenie is like a contracting job (W-9) which doesn't give any real long-term benefits.
OP Sergiusz 6 | 22    
  11 Jan 2019  #4
I'm familiar with the differences between the two. My question is about possibility of umowa o prace in private schools and other pros and cons of working in a public one...
mafketis 17 | 6,529    
11 Jan 2019  #5
My three groszes (nb may be a bit outdated)

The traditional way that language teachers (at all levels from elementary thru university) have worked in Poland is to have a state job for social insurance purposes and then moonlight to make up for the financial shortfalls.

Private schools should be seen in that light - many/most of their teachers have day jobs and don't need benefits from the private school (which even if they do need them they won't get them unless they have an in with the decision makers...)

Discipline is liable to be a problem in public schools for all ages (problems peak at around 12-15 years old). Many foreign teachers have found themselves completely unable to achieve and/or maintain discipline in the classroom. It's not that the kids are that unruly but foreigners are unlikely to know what buttons to push to bring and keep the kids in line. Polish colleagues are likely to be no help because they can't understand why this dumb foreigner doesn't know how to deal with normal schoolchildren and don't consciously know how they maintain discipline - they just do.

In private schools there's often an attitude "I paid for this so I'd better learn something and if I don't it's the teacher's fault" so you need how to impress upon them that you can't learn the material for them and that they have to be willing to do the work themselves.

There's more, but I'll let others with more up-to-date knowledge have a chance.
Lyzko 19 | 5,777    
11 Jan 2019  #6
At least in Polish schools, based upon my contacts in various Polish cities, the vast majority of pupils are Polish-born first language speakers compared, say, with Germany, where Berlin's student population under thirteen is predominantly foreign, with a second language as mother tongue is spoken at home.
OP Sergiusz 6 | 22    
11 Jan 2019  #7
Thank you - mafketis, Lyzko and Nathans - for replying. Yeah, I am aware of the classroom management issues. I guess it's like everywhere..

Anything on the teaching workload? I saw couple job offers (public schools) that said 18hrs/w and 21hrs/w full time. Is there a standard?

Also, how willing are public school administrations to deal with foreigners (papers, permits etc)?
delphiandomine 86 | 17,392    
13 Jan 2019  #8
Simply put, they won't deal with it.
MoOli 9 | 488    :-(
13 Jan 2019  #9
Also, how willing are public school administrations to deal with foreigners (papers, permits etc)?

Be careful,a school just duped a Canadian friend of mine.She moved to Poland from China and the school didn't do nothing for her and gave her a shared studio accommodation.She overstayed and is now back in Canda.


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