The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Work  % width posts: 17

Teaching English in Poland without TESL certificate?


Margo12 1 | 3
14 Aug 2012 #1
Is it possible to teach English without a TESL certificate?
I have EU citizenship, but reside in USA.
I have a Maste's degree in Library and some experience teaching English here.
How difficult would it be to find employment?

Thank you kindly for any information.

PS. Would teaching English cover average living expenses?
smurf 39 | 1,981
14 Aug 2012 #2
you'd get a job, but not in any of the main cities and you'd be paid crap money, get a celta and you'll be able to earn more
teflcat 5 | 1,032
14 Aug 2012 #3
Is it possible to teach English without a TESL certificate?

Yes, but you'd have to either work for an exploitative cowboy outfit or go it alone, legally or illegally.

I have EU citizenship

That would be a big help.

I have a Maste's degree in Library

I'm not sure what an MA in Library means, but an MA means a lot here.

Would teaching English cover average living expenses?

It covers more than just living expenses if you are qualified. Why not take a course in TEFL/TESOL? The outlay would make a big difference in the long run.
AlicjaK - | 14
14 Aug 2012 #4
My sister worked as English teacher in Callan school, legally without a certificate. She didnt earn much, but enough.
OP Margo12 1 | 3
15 Aug 2012 #5
MA means I have a masters degree (it's in library science) and a Bachelors degree in arts.

I think I will look into the test you suggested.
This is great information. Thank you.

You did say that a degree means a lot there.. it is not an engineering degree. Does it still help? It's just a Master's in Library, editing, literacy, research and such.
scottie1113 7 | 898
15 Aug 2012 #6
If you want to teach English in Poland, get a CELTA. A TEFL certificate is pretty worthless here unless you're willing to work for second class schools. Where in Poland would you like to live, and why Poland?
OP Margo12 1 | 3
15 Aug 2012 #7
I know Polish so teaching English in Poland would make sense.
Preferably near Krakow or Wroclaw, but those are not my exclusive choices. Somewhere West, close to transportation to a quick visit to other countries.
jon357 63 | 14,255
15 Aug 2012 #8
I know Polish so teaching English in Poland would make sense

You wouldn't be required to use Polish in the classrooom - many schools do not allow that.
OP Margo12 1 | 3
15 Aug 2012 #9
Can I still teach without CELTA. A TEFL
if I have a Master's degree in literacy/library research.

Is a Master's degree valuable in EU?
scottie1113 7 | 898
15 Aug 2012 #10
Can I still teach without CELTA. A TEFL

Yes, but not at a good school.

Is a Master's degree valuable in EU?

Somewhat, but a CELTA will open many more doors.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
15 Aug 2012 #11
You wouldn't be required to use Polish in the classrooom - many schools do not allow that.

Which is odd, to say the least - surely if someone is able to explain a tricky concept in the mother tongue of the students, it makes life easier for everyone?
pam
16 Aug 2012 #12
You would think so wouldn't you!
Not that i'm a teacher, but i would imagine half the lesson would end up being taught in Polish if the students realised their English teacher was also fluent in their native language.

Far too easy for a teacher to be taken advantage of methinks.
Nightglade 7 | 97
16 Aug 2012 #13
But an experienced and knowledgeable teacher would know when it's better to use L1 or L2, as well as know how to control language output in the class.

I used to follow the philosophy that it's much better for a student or teacher to explain something purely in English as it forces the Ss to think and talk in the target language (which, arguably, seems like the most productive method). However, you eventually come to realise that all of those minutes sitting around and watching the student awkwardly struggle like a fish out of water to find something that they perhaps just don't have, are a waste of time. I had a student some time ago who had only a very basic understanding of English and would often mumble the Polish word they were trying to find. If I knew it, I'd say it, because it's far more productive to spend those minutes teaching or reinforcing rather than destroying their soul and motivation, or creating awkward moments.

Just my opinion :)
scottie1113 7 | 898
16 Aug 2012 #14
Not that i'm a teacher, but i would imagine half the lesson would end up being taught in Polish

Most good schools won't let you speak Polish in the classroom. You're supposed to teach English. If it's a question of vocabulary, just have your students look up the word in a dictionary. Then again, I don't teach beginners, nor will I.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
16 Aug 2012 #15
However, you eventually come to realise that all of those minutes sitting around and watching the student awkwardly struggle like a fish out of water to find something that they perhaps just don't have, are a waste of time. I had

I suppose that depends on how effective a teacher you are.
Nightglade 7 | 97
16 Aug 2012 #16
No, it doesn't. In a group environment it's different, but in a 1-to-1 setting, it's counter productive to leave them struggling. 60 minutes a day, once or twice a week - spending 5 minutes trying to find a singular word in their memory (which they may not have) for something simple, when you can provide that word for them and allow them to reinforce it is far more effective. That said, if you're in a situation where your students are constantly struggling to find words, then you've chosen a topic that's too difficult :)
scottie1113 7 | 898
16 Aug 2012 #17
You'll find this a great site about teaching English in Poland:


Home / Work / Teaching English in Poland without TESL certificate?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.