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TAXATION for a foreigner in Poland


simpleguy11
29 Aug 2019  #1
Hi I have moved to Poland on 1st Aug 2019, and recently got my salary(ofcourse after tax and ZUS deductions), one of my friend is suggesting me that since we are staying in Poland for less than 183 days in this financial year we are not liable to pay any taxes this year, how true is that?
dovla
29 Aug 2019  #2
Not true.

Individuals with their place of residence in Poland are taxed on their total income, regardless of where the income is earned (unlimited tax obligation in Poland). Individuals who do not have a place of residence in Poland are taxed solely on income earned in Poland (limited tax obligation in Poland).

An individual with a place of residence in the Republic of Poland is a person who:

is physically present in the Republic of Poland for more than 183 days during a tax year, or
has a centre of personal or economic interests in the Republic of Poland (centre of vital interests).

delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
29 Aug 2019  #3
It's nearly impossible to avoid being taxed in Poland if you live in Poland for that exact reason.

Furthermore, the OP should make sure to declare the foreign income earnt this year to Poland as well at the end of the tax year.
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,125
30 Aug 2019  #4
To us, Americans, communist Poland was heaven with that 100zl for a dollar exchange rate. Now, Poland is almost just as expensive. Which is good for those like me who hate dilemmas. No dilemma now.
Wincig 2 | 185
30 Aug 2019  #5
Maybe it was heaven for you or for other western foreigners, but it was hell for the Poles living there. I think the current situation is much preferable :)
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,125
30 Aug 2019  #6
but it was hell for the Poles living there.

You are right. That's why I left in 1966. My comment was about how rich 100 bucks felt then. Today, eating out in Poland is almost as expensive as in the US.
Wincig 2 | 185
30 Aug 2019  #7
Indeed, I remember eating a delicious meal in Wierzynek in 1986 for a few francs. Even expensive French wines were cheaper in Poland than in France when you applied the black market exchange rate.. I also remember coming somewhat shameful out of this meal; there was a table of Germans next to us behaving as though the place belonged to them..
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,125
30 Aug 2019  #8
In the sixties, my father, a professor and a Ph.D. was making 5000zl a month. My first salary in the US in 1967 was $900 or 90,000zl a month.

The big mystery of Polish economy is how Poles, making so much less than we make here, can afford the almost American prices. I really don't get it.
cms neuf - | 938
30 Aug 2019  #9
A free can of smoked sprats on Victory Day and a shiny "hero of the basement " badge to wear at the parade -"

please back to the topic, everyone
jgrabner 1 | 71
31 Aug 2019  #10
The rule is the same as (most?) other WE countries: stay less than 50% of the year and you are only taxed on the income you earn in the country. Stay longer and you are taxed on your worldwide income. In order to avoid double taxation, there are agreements between (most) countries to avoid that. That is only concerning the PIT, social security contributions are always to be paid in full, even if you work just for one day.

To pay no income tax at all is possible only with a very short stay. The amount of tax free income was in 2018 6,600 PLN. Your employer does not know that, so he will deduct the PIT as if you were employed for 12 months, but if you leave earlier, there is a good chance you will get all or at least part of your taxes back after the end of the year because the income tax rate is progressive with a fixed decuctible. Theoretically you could move every 1-2 months from one country to another in order to avoid paying no income tax at all but of course the costs would outweigh the benefits.

If you really stay for a short while, do not forget to file for tax reimbursement after the end of the year.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
3 Sep 2019  #11
The rule is the same as (most?) other WE countries: .

Not quite. If your "centre of vital interests" are in PL, then you're liable regardless.


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