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What are the job opportunities in Poland for a young Italian with a law degree?


Chimismi 1 | 4
25 Jun 2015  #1
Hello everybody!
I'm a 25 yo Italian graduate in law (5 years studies), I would like to move to Poland soon. I speak fluent English and a really basic Polish.

What kind of job roles I could aspire? Is it possible for me to find a job in an international company? It would be my first serious work experience

Thank you for your assistance
M.
angry pole
25 Jun 2015  #2
Hi Chimismi,
What's the reason and motivation behind those plans?
OP Chimismi 1 | 4
25 Jun 2015  #3
My girl is Polish and lives there but this is not the only reason. Currently job opportunities in Italy with a law degree are not so many, salaries are really low for young graduates at first job experience, contracts offered usually are just some months.

Of course I could become a lawyer here, but I just don't want to spend my next two years just for training for 300 euro for a month. I want to start earning money and collect some work experience.

I like Poland a lot and I like people there, I just feel I want to go
terri 1 | 1,620
25 Jun 2015  #4
You could always try a recruitment agency to see what they say.
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
25 Jun 2015  #5
Chimismi, do you speak Polish or at least intend to learn any? I ask because it would greatly enhance your prospects as would conversely for a Pole working in Italy to learn Italian:-)
OP Chimismi 1 | 4
25 Jun 2015  #6
I understand a bit basic everyday conversations, and I'm starting to talk with not so much respect for grammar. But ofc I'm learning, especially when I'm visiting my girl in Poland I'm forced to communicate somehow. Idk I guess my level is A1 for now, for sure next step is to start to study grammar
angry pole
25 Jun 2015  #7
I would strongly advice against moving to Poland in the beginning of your career. Even if you will be able to find some work - it will be far from rewarding dead end job in the call center which for sure wouldn't be a good start for a recent graduate. To evaluate job opportunities just imagine which opportunities a recent Polish law graduate who speaks zero Italian in Italy might have. The same you will have in Poland, even less considering the scale of economy.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
25 Jun 2015  #8
@Angry Pole: 100% with you! Yes, the OP must ask himself what kind of job a Pole with no Italian and no professional experience could do in Italy?

As to getting a lousy underpaid at some crappy call center, it is possible in Poland as they are always looking for people since nobody stays long but sorry to start one's cv with an experience in a lousy call center shall NOT help in career development. Recruiters shall look at it like lack of ambition.

Best bet: to live in Italy with the girl. She'll learn Italian faster than he'll learn Polish and Italy is a nicer place to live than Poland is...
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #9
To evaluate job opportunities just imagine which opportunities a recent Polish law graduate who speaks zero Italian in Italy might have

That's not comparable. As I did not study law, I do not know about the job market for young law graduates in Poland but I did live with an law graduate from Italy here in Lodz. He said that in Italy you won't have a chance of a good job after your graduation if you don't have the right connections.

So the choice was sitting on his law degree in Italy hoping that at some point someone will give him a chance or move to Poland to work in a job that requires his language and would allow him to learn new skills.

What's better? Having a job with some SSC in Poland, maybe working in finance.......... or sitting at home in Italy doing nothing, hoping for something to pop up at some point?
OP Chimismi 1 | 4
25 Jun 2015  #10
I thank everyone who kindly answered. I wanted to say that I know I wouldn't have a chance in Polish companies, I'm oriented to the multinational companies that require Italian native speaker with an university degree: maybe HR or credit collection?

I'm also considering Italian companies in Poland (there are lot's of).
DominicB - | 2,672
25 Jun 2015  #11
So the choice was sitting on his law degree in Italy hoping that at some point someone will give him a chance or move to Poland to work in a job that requires his language and would allow him to learn new skills.

What's better? Having a job with some SSC in Poland, maybe working in finance.......... or sitting at home in Italy doing nothing, hoping for something to pop up at some point?

No, no, no, no, for God's sake NOOOOOOOO! That is not the choice. Those are only two options out of many, many options available to this guy, and neither of them is even close to the best option. And working at some lousy SSC in Poland is pretty darn close to career suicide.

He could try to find work in a richer country. With or without his girlfriend. Cashwise, it would be a lot better than working a dead end, poorly-paid, soul-crushing job in a call center. But with a lousy law degree, chances of advancement anywhere are limited.

He could also cross-train in a more useful field than law, or in a field that increases the value of his law degree. Of course, I'm going to trot out my stock recommendations: financial engineering, financial mathematics, econometrics, actuarial sciences, and petroleum,geological or biomedical engineering. Combined with a law degree, a serious math-intensive degree can open a lot of doors, especially for someone who does not have connections, as the OP apparently doesn't.

To me, reschooling seems to be by far the best option for the OP. In any case, Poland does not enter into the equation, neither for work, nor for school. He should focus on finding a serious program at a good university, and, if necessary take a year or two to bring his math up to the level that he will be accepted into a good program at someplace like London School of Economics or Imperial College, for example.

And he's going to have to be realistic about the future of his relationship with this girl. He has bigger fish to fry, and she probably does, too.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #12
If you are looking for something in Lodz, send me a PM. There is one company that constantly looks for people with European languages. They will even take care of your relocation.

lousy SSC

Can you please elaborate as to what you "believe" a "lousy SSC" is?
DominicB - | 2,672
25 Jun 2015  #13
When there are better options available, and there a plenty of much better ones in this particular case, any SSC is a lousy SSC.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #14
Dominic, that does not answer my question. You are talking around my question.

What is a "lousy SSC"?

Do you even know what SSC is?
DominicB - | 2,672
25 Jun 2015  #15
I answered your question directly, completely and correctly. No elaboration is necessary.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #16
So in other words, you don't have a clue!

What is an Italian lawyer going to do with his Italian law degree outside of Italy? Nothing, right?

Where would he get a chance to use his legal knowledge outside of Italy, in his native language if not in an SSC? Nowhere, right?

So when you claim that -

When there are better options available

- I wonder which options? His degree is useless outside of Italy and can only be applied by working in an SSC.

But seeing that you believe that SSC's are lousy and don't offer any perspective, I wonder why you would advise the OP to go to a richer country? What will he do in that richer country? Continue to look at his law degree which is useless for him unless he works in an SSC for a multinational company and being responsible for that multinational's Italian entity?
DominicB - | 2,672
25 Jun 2015  #17
Where would he get a chance to use his legal knowledge outside of Italy, in his native language if not in an SSC?

Wrong question. Again, false dichotomy. Poland sucks as a career choice for this individual, and there's no point in putting lipstick on that pig.

I wonder which options?

I listed several.

His degree is useless outside of Italy and can only be applied by working in an SSC

Logical failure of the worst sort here. No, that is a total non-sequitur, and utterly wrong.

I wonder why you would advise the OP to go to a richer country? What will he do in that richer country

I did no such thing. I just pointed out that working in a richer country would be much better than working in Poland in just about every respect, especially savings potential. Having a nest egg opens up opportunities in terms of self-improvement.

My advice to to reschool, so that he doesn't end up spending the rest of his miserable life together with all the unambitious, unimaginative losers that eke out an pitiful dead-end existence trapped in lousy SSCs in backward countries like Poland.

You asked me to define SSC, and that's as good as a definition as you will ever get: a graveyard for unambitious, unimaginative losers.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #18
I did no such thing. I just pointed out that working in a richer country would be much better than working in Poland in just about every respect, especially savings potential. Having a nest egg opens up opportunities in terms of self-improvement.

Yes? And on which basis / degree? Without a job in a SSC that would allow the OP to work for the Italian entity of the company the OP would be left with no qualifications.

So why would the OP go to a richer country as you have advised? To clean toilets, change bedsheets in a hotel? Or should he try his luck in a SSC in Poland and work for the Italian entity from Poland?

Your lack of knowledge vs. the advice you are trying to give is appauling.

You are telling the OP to go to a "richer country" without taking into consideration that his degree will be worthless unless he finds an international company to work for and again work in SSC. Something he would be able to do without any problem in Poland.

Stop giving people advice on things you know little about. You don't impress anyone here with your nonsense.
DominicB - | 2,672
25 Jun 2015  #19
I did not advise the OP to go work in a richer country.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #20
Of course not. Must have been a misunderstanding then.

find work in a richer country.

DominicB - | 2,672
25 Jun 2015  #21
Yes, you misunderstood. Totally. Read post #11 again. Carefully.
angry pole
25 Jun 2015  #22
@Chimismi - why isn't your girl considering moving to Italy with you? Did you even ask? Cause that might be a good indicator of how serious she is about your future relationship.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #23
you misunderstood.

So now you say that he should not go to a richer country? Strange because normally you tell everyone else to go to a richer country.

Dominic, it is obvious that you have no clue. You tried so many times and all you have argue is "go to a richer country". When presented with real life examples, you turn quiet.

I did not advise the OP to go work in a richer country.

So now this OP should not go to a richer country but all others should. Is that what you are saying?
Totti
25 Jun 2015  #24
Ciao Chimismi,

I like the girls in PL as much as you do, but you would be way better off in the long run starting a career in a more established/wealthier economy, regardless of the fact that at the beginning you may have to be working virtually for free there... You do realise that PL is extremely limited in terms of career development/growth prospects/security especially for a foreigner - just look at the 1,000s of young people leaving for that reason alone every year, never mind the financial aspect? You could always then easily come to PL for vacation from say I, CH, GB, D, F... I just think you will be wasting your time and efforts in PL if you have a chance of living in more developed economy, honestly... good luck to yu either way, but you have been forewarned... ;-(
angry pole
25 Jun 2015  #25
@JollyRomek - you seriously state that OP is better off ending up working in dead end job in SSC in Poland for 300-400 euros netto per month, than trying to build a career (not necessarilly in law) in a MNC on his home turf? Even the worst possible job he can get in Italy will be much more rewarding and easier to get than what he can count on in Poland.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
25 Jun 2015  #26
dead end job in SSC in Poland for 300-400 euros netto per month,

Where do you get this from?

Please, please........educate yourself before you answer.

You quote salaries below the minimum wage in Poland. Please, don't bother me if you don't have a clue.
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
25 Jun 2015  #27
Time out, guys!

Ahemm, rarely are foreign degrees "transferrable" anywhere outside the home country:-) Embarrassed to say I know of a German dentist, aka maxio-facial/plastiofacial oral surgeon (tooth extractor, to youLOL) who wasn't able to work in, of all places NewYork City, with a degree from a top dental college in Munich!! No bull.

Admittedly, a Harvard, Columbia or Oxford degree in almost any subject is pretty damned tough to turn down, there are plenty of other fine institutions whose degrees don't pass muster away from where they are issued.
Totti
25 Jun 2015  #28
That's not entirely correct: there are no longer issues with degree recognition (except perhaps special categories) within the EU member states, so it's rather a trans-continental issue.
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
25 Jun 2015  #29
...meaning an American degree just might not be recognized/acknowledged by a leading Polish university as well as vice-versa??
Totti
25 Jun 2015  #30
Correct


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