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Looking for job - English teaching positions available in Poland?


queen 1 | 10
7 Nov 2012  #1
Hey all, new to the forum but I've been lurking for a while lol
I guess it's been asked before but does anyone know of any current positions available?

Cheers
pantsless 1 | 267
7 Nov 2012  #2
Hey all, new to the forum but I've been lurking for a while lol

Why is that funny?

I guess it's been asked before but does anyone know of any current positions available?

In the entire country of Poland?
OP queen 1 | 10
12 Nov 2012  #3
s

In the entire country of Poland?

yes
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
15 Nov 2012  #4
Things must be pretty tough in my back yard, someone's now begging for work at just 20zl an hour. Previously the lowest I was aware of was 30zl an hour.

The one above says he is qualified - if that's the £1000 CELTA course then he's going to have to be very busy to just break even.
mullerriceman 2 | 23
16 Nov 2012  #5
Not a great time of yearfor jobs unless you're in a city with lots of business English 1-2-1s on offer i.e. Warsaw. Check on my site for general advice.
OP queen 1 | 10
16 Nov 2012  #6
Thank you Sir, just what I was hoping to find!
Nightglade 7 | 97
16 Nov 2012  #7

With an advertisement like that, it's not surprising that he has stooped to 20zł an hour. Maybe you should contact him under guise and find out what 'qualification' he has.

"Qualified - Professional - Amazing". Anybody who describes themselves as 'amazing' is probably worth staying away from :) That said, he does state "lessons from 20zł" which could mean that's the lowest price for students who "block book".

Also, don't presume that because somebody advertises themselves at such a low price, that the local market is struggling. We've had people doing the same here in Poznań for years - usually as an 'attractive' means to get quick and easy beer money. However, there are still private students willing to pay 50zł an hour for a good tutor, although it seems that 40 is increasingly the going rate.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Nov 2012  #8
Not a great time of yearfor jobs unless you're in a city with lots of business English 1-2-1s on offer i.e. Warsaw.

Looked at one or two pages of your site, probably all useful stuff but (sigh) no apostrophe in PCs, nor in 1990s... etc. Please read theoatmeal.com/comics/apostrophe

Pretty essential that teachers know where an apostrophe goes, or they shouldn't be teaching.

Anyone looking to teach should try to get the concessionary rate at a college in the UK so that their CELTA either costs nothing at all, or is seriously discounted. Blowing a grand on a course in Poland should only be done if a proper job offer is lined up.

With an advertisement like that, it's not surprising that he has stooped to 20zł an hour.

It is struggling - please refer to my previous posts where I have spoken to teachers who tell me that. Belt squeeze time right now - the cheap supermarkets are seeing a surge of customers. This ripples across to all sectors, or nearly all.

As for the 20zl person - not unique. Plenty at 30zl advertised on those stickers. Very few strips torn off.

What's more - I have made it my business (sad I know) to talk to lots of supermarket staff these past few weeks. Almost all speak pretty good English now, I gather mostly via school classes. Fewer and fewer people need additional coaching.
OP queen 1 | 10
16 Nov 2012  #9
but (sigh) no apostrophe in PCs, nor in 1990s.

mullerriceman is correct, no apostrophe required.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Nov 2012  #10
Well I don't know whose website that is, but the website does indeed have apostrophes in the words, which is why I mentioned it as an error. IE 1990's should read 1990s. PC's should read PCs, etc. What I wrote above was the correct example, not a quotation of the mistake.

Apostrophe misuse is a common error, and that's why it is seen so often and becomes the norm.

Had a very quick glance through that website and it seems very interesting, of course. Lots there that people should know, lots of good tips.
OP queen 1 | 10
16 Nov 2012  #11
My apologies, I misunderstood. You are indeed correct, no apostrophe required. There are some errors on the website that I hope the owner will rectify now he is aware. I agree, lots of good tips.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Nov 2012  #12
No, it's probably my fault as I wasn't clear enough when I mentioned the surplus apostrophes. But little sleep again last night, that's my excuse!

Best of luck with your future career, and just my tuppence worth is that the smaller towns seem to have more work (based on what I read here) because perhaps the larger cities seem to have a sufficient supply of native speakers for most of the year.

TBH it's not a job I think I could do -- but someone has to do it and I wish you well.
OP queen 1 | 10
16 Nov 2012  #13
No problem, at least we cleared it up :-)

Thanks for the advice, any help is appreciated. Btw, do you mind if I ask your nationality and occupation?
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Nov 2012  #14
nationality and occupation?

I'm British (a Southerner) and not working, which is just as well as haven't had a decent night's sleep since I got here. Not kidding btw.
OP queen 1 | 10
16 Nov 2012  #15
Ah, me too! (Dorset). No hidden agenda in my request, I just find that different nationalities have a different sense of humour ;-)
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Nov 2012  #16
Only the bravest Pole will try to tell a joke in English! I don't know much about their SOH, to my mind they seem quite glum a lot of the time, but maybe that's just their reaction when they see me :o)

Anyway, remember that with the English teaching many do come and try it and then give up and go home. Steel yourself, be persistent, and with any luck if you really want to do it then you'll succeed.

Here in Wroc, it might just be a perception thing but am finding more and more of them speak English already. Even the girls who helped me in a DIY shop (Leroy Merlin - no quibble refunds more often than not, great store, although prices not always as keen as others) and various large supermarkets have stock replenishment operatives (shelf stackers!) who speak English well thanks to their school or uni. The mistake I made when I first came here was trying to make myself understood in Polish without announcing clearly that I spoke English. The result was many who can speak English did not recognise my accent and didn't even try English with me! Total farce really!
OP queen 1 | 10
16 Nov 2012  #17
Good advice. To my chagrin, the 'English abroad' stereotype, i.e. 'speak s l o w l y and LOUDLY', is unfortunately still prevalent in most foreign cities that I've visited.

I'll try :-)
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
16 Nov 2012  #18
:o)

You may find quite fluent speakers in ordinary shops here sometimes - I was in Euro Net and one of them speaks English fluently and fast with a slight American accent. Strangely, few have been to the UK at all. One at an airport cafe here speaks English with a Southern Irish accent, again very fast. Many will understand what is being said but don't feel confident enough to reply using an English sentence. Quite a few English words are well-known, just as we know Uno or Finito or Voila, and other foreign words used in Britain, so in the same way Poles know quite a few English words. What throws them is our accent as we say them! We sound sort of Dutch to their ears (see Dom Joly in Trigger Happy TV for that sound demonstrated really well).


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