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How to find work in Warsaw "if u don't speak Polish" !


DominicB - | 2,709
12 Jul 2015 #61
some immigrant dialect of Polish

Such dialects do not exist in Poland. Immigrant communities are much too recent, much too small and much too scattered. Actually, except for Vietnamese, there are no immigrant "communities" in Poland at all, at least nothing approaching anything you would see in the West. Just a bunch of rather disjointed and very loosely connected individual short-term migrants. Most "immigrants" to Poland leave within a few years, at most.
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
12 Jul 2015 #62
Same almost as in Berlin! Only there, the Vietnamese during the late '90's, had a hammerlock on the newspaper kiosk concessions:-)
None whom I encoutered spoke as much as a syllable of GermanLOL Normally, someone who did was there in the stand along with them in order to facilitate the transaction. Otherwise, SIGN LANGUAGE - the ONLY truly "universal" language:-)
Polsyr 6 | 769
12 Jul 2015 #63
@Lyzko; I speak both Polish and Arabic and I assure you that there is no hybrid dialect between the two, although someone that knows a little bit of each might mistakenly think that Yiddish sounds like a mix of two, which it isn't.

Multilingual families (such as mine) tend to use a mix of multiple languages to facilitate communication, sometimes even 3 consecutive words can be said in 3 different languages and would still make sense within the family. This is typical of multilingual families regardless of the language sets involved.

However, there aren't enough Polish + Arabic speakers out there to create their own dialect.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
12 Jul 2015 #64
Same almost as in Berlin! Only there, the Vietnamese during the late '90's, had a hammerlock on the newspaper kiosk concessions:-)
None whom I encoutered spoke as much as a syllable of GermanLOL Normally, someone who did was there in the stand along with them in order to facilitate the transaction. Otherwise, SIGN LANGUAGE - the ONLY truly "universal" language:-)

Once again you are talking "facts" about Germany which I as a German do not recognize. I am from Berlin and there most certainly was no Vietnamese "hammerlock" on news stands / kiosks in Berlin. And most likely there was no such thing as a seller who had a translator standing next to him to assist with the transaction. The only thing they controlled was the black market cigarette trade. Honestly Lyzko, I would really prefer it if you stop talking nonsense about my home country.

This thread needs to get back on track
Yousif
13 Jul 2015 #65
Hi again, I'm so sorry that I did not write that I speak Arabic and Polish and English.. And I confirm that there is no dialect like Polish Arabic ;).
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
13 Jul 2015 #66
I consider myself/We consider ourselves confirmed:-)
djouhara
20 Jul 2015 #67
Witam , i need help im girl from algeria i speak tylko english and litel polish bcs not easy longe and i try . I want fond work
InPolska 11 | 1,821
20 Jul 2015 #68
Hi! First of all, what is your status in Poland? What are your qualifications? Finding work in Poland without Polish is possible only in very rare situations (working in IT for international companies, working as an expat or teaching languages). Do you think one can find a job in Algeria without speaking Arabic?
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
20 Jul 2015 #69
Touche, InPolska! Right on:-)
InPolska 11 | 1,821
20 Jul 2015 #70
@Lyszko: obviously unless limited exceptions, Polish is necessary to work in Poland (normal ;)). As to the poster, she may use her Arabic language skills (but I dout such skills are very much in demand in Poland) in addtion to other concrete skills.

Of course, she could look for a cleaning job but I doubt it is what she has in mind ;)
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
20 Jul 2015 #71
Just common respect to learn the language as well as possible of the country in which you are working:-)
shahru06
21 Jul 2015 #72
Hi, i m rupali shah from India, nearby i m shifting to poland in warsaw city and i have total 7 years of experience overall and 4 years of experience in TCS (BPO). I know English so if in case there is any profile matching to my experience kindly contact me on the below details.

Email :- rups_129@yahoo.co.in
Contact No:-07405873299
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
21 Jul 2015 #73
Learn some Polish first, or you'll just become another burden on society!
InPolska 11 | 1,821
21 Jul 2015 #74
Learning some Polish is not enough to get a job in Poland and if the idea is to make 2 or 3,000 ZL, best to go elsewhere ;)
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
21 Jul 2015 #75
Another cheap labor society, a la the US??
shahru06
24 Jul 2015 #76
Hi Lyzko,

I know little polish language and i have 4 years of experience in Tata consultancy services and TCS i m handling belgium team (referecence data).

So kindly confirm me is there any job regarding me.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
24 Jul 2015 #77
@Shahru: I suppose you need a work permit since you are not from EU. In such a case, it'll be very difficult to find employer who'll accept to go through the hassle of applying for a work permit when he can hire Poles and EU citizens with no formalities.

I'm not saying that you have 0% chance, I'm just saying it'll be very difficult ;)
Kirill - | 4
21 Sep 2015 #78
Hey folks!
I'm a 24 years old Ukrainian guy looking to relocate to Poland and I need a job there. Here are the details:

JOB: Ideally in the games development industry. Because of lack of experience I'm ready to start as QA Tester, though I'm looking forward a career in production (associate/junior producer). I might consider other options too if you have something to recommend.

EDUCATION: Master's degree in (specialty) 'Systems and methods of taking decisions' (a certain mix of Systems Analysis, Data Mining and Economics). Graduated in 2013.

DOCUMENTS: Karta Polaka, National Visa. I don't need work permit, can legally live in Poland, though I would have to either make new Visa every year (might need to come to Ukraine for roughly a week each time) or exchange my Karta Polaka for Karta Stalego Pobytu.

LANGUAGES: Native Russian and Ukrainian, Upper-intermediate English, planning to learn Polish (and improve English).

CITY: Warsaw is the best option, then Krakow, then any other major city (there isn't really a noticeable gamedev community elsewhere)

FLAT: hostels/student houses/sharing flats for the time being (because salary wouldn't be that great)

FRIENDS: Don't have any in Poland. I would need to actively socialize to improve my language and social skills (not only for that ofc). If you think you could stand me struggling to speak Polish with you - write me a message, we'll figure something out =)

CONTACT: I'm a new member, so it's possible I can't write you a private message here. If you write me one and I don't reply - the answer might be in this topic. Or you can write me a letter to Tirolad at gmail dot com.

That could be it, can't think of anything important for you to know. Help with any of these would be appreciated. Advices and recommendations are also welcome. Thank you.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
21 Sep 2015 #79
Regarding job, you might take a look at pracuj.pl/praca/ -> select IT rozwój oprogramowania -> programowanie or testowanie -> quite a few offers are in English, those in Polish often can be figured out looking at the job title -> like C# Developer etc. although those in Polish often require fluent Polish...

Or check websites of the companies you are interested in -> for example: en.cdprojektred.com/jobs/ but you probably know it better than I do...
Kirill - | 4
22 Sep 2015 #80
I have difficulties finding work from outside: companies just prefer local candidates - less headache. Even though I tell them they don't need to do anything, they receive lots of applications for entry level positions and can afford not to listen. I am thinking about coming to Poland (let's say Warsaw) and search for the right job from there, but I need a job to afford a living, so it's kind of a catch 22.

Basically, regarding a job, I'm here to find out about a job opportunity some of you might know about and can recommend. Ideally in game development, but if not - just a job that would allow me to relocate and figure something out later.

Requirement: job is not a scam. Preferences: less physical, more intellectual work.

Thanks for the answer BTW
dbrzhltl
22 Sep 2015 #81
@Kirill, do you have any expertise in robbing caravans? I think this skill set is a must for you in order to get a job in your desired area in Poland.
DominicB - | 2,709
23 Sep 2015 #82
they receive lots of applications for entry level positions and can afford not to listen.

Of all the IT related fields, gaming is the one that most suffers from a glut of job applicants, and wages are very low. Testing is similar. So a job as a tester in gaming would be very poorly paid indeed, and the competition would be fierce. Education related to gaming attracts far more than its fair share of hopeless losers who would be desperate to take any job related to gaming.

I am thinking about coming to Poland (let's say Warsaw) and search for the right job from there

I wouldn't recommend that unless you had substantial savings to last you for about six months. And even then, I wouldn't bet the farm on breaking into the Polish gaming industry.

Master's degree in (specialty) 'Systems and methods of taking decisions' (a certain mix of Systems Analysis, Data Mining and Economics).

That's not a very useful degree, frankly. Consider upgrading that to an engineering degree, either in IT or, even better, in a much more profitable field like petroleum, geological or biomedical engineering, or even financial engineering, financial mathematics, econometrics or actuarial science. With those fields, you would have little trouble finding well-paid jobs around the world.
Kirill - | 4
23 Sep 2015 #83
I was waiting for your response, Dominic ) Kind of did a little research on what answers where already given to other people asking similar questions. While your attitude is admirable, it would be more useful were you actually trying to help these people, instead of trying to explain them why they suck or would suck in the nearest future. No offence.

Preparing and learning is all good, but there is no limit to that. One could do that all his life - without some action he'll never actually achieve anything. So if someone has decided to exercise in action and asks for help (and if you are willing to provide it), it's usually better to think about that person's objectives and ways to achieve them, than to give him tons of reasons to drop the idea. Should he fail on his route - well, at least he tried. You personally don't lose anything anyway.

1) Gamedev industry is not very healthy indeed. For the happy times you need to either be very lucky or have patience and some time to test it hard. But there are also good parts, to see them you have to be careful who you work with and to stay competitive.

2) Like I said, I've tried to find the job from the outside, with no luck so far. It might work out eventually, but the time spent on this would probably be too much of a cost.

It's a risky move, I get it. If possible, I would avoid such risks either, but I'm not designing the rules here. What I can do is adapt and seek opportunities.

3) It's actually an IT degree from an Engineering Academy, so in your world it should be super-duper useful.

In an online world there are tons of metrics to analyze, allowing you to simultaneously make customers happier and make more money from each and every one of them. Game development is no exception, especially with the rise of free to play games.

Degree in and of itself, however, only helps to solve bureaucratic problems - it's the skills and knowledge that matter (plus people you get to know while studying), especially in the IT. There are plenty of programmers without any degree earning six-digit salaries, too bad I'm not one of them : )

I just gave the information needed, didn't say I bet all my hopes on that degree.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
23 Sep 2015 #84
Ah DomiB "helpful" as usual...

K. If you are just looking something for a start, check BPO/SSC jobs for Russian speakers, very few young Poles are fluent in Russian, so often people from ex-Soviet countries do these jobs, which are usually some boring shyt but better that than nothing...

pracuj.pl/praca/customer-service-specialist-with-russian-warszawa,oferta,4126788
pracuj.pl/praca/quality-analyst-russian-and-english-speaker-krakow,oferta,4123682
etc.
DominicB - | 2,709
23 Sep 2015 #85
it would be more useful were you actually trying to help these people

I gave you the best advice you will get. You're still young, and reschooling in a more salable field is still possible and will make a huge difference in your quality of life.

It's actually an IT degree from an Engineering Academy, so in your world it should be super-duper useful.

If it's not an actually engineering degree, with title, then it's not all that useful. And no, I don't consider even engineering degrees in IT all that super-duper unless they are from top-notch research universities. There are engineering specialties that are much more lucrative, like the ones I listed above.

Now I'll give you some advice on how to find a job. First of all, any job that you see advertised on internet job boards or hear about from unsolicited "recruiters" is most likely a lousy job for lousy pay. Good jobs are advertised almost entirely by word of mouth, especially in the real world between real people talking face to face. Build up and exploit your network of valuable real world contacts in the Ukraine, especially those who are working or have worked in richer countries.

Also, send out hundreds of snail mail cover letters and CVs to department managers in companies you want to work for. Don't waste time on deep research, just find addresses and fire off generic letters to department managers en masse. You don't even have to know the manager's name. DO NOT send letters to HR departments or "recruiters": they will almost certainly end up in the trash. If you have a well written cover letter and CV, it can capture the interest of the manager, and if the manager decides that you will be a valuable addition to the team, you are MUCH more likely to get hired. A response rate of 1 or 2 percent to your letters would be stellar. Much higher than by using the internet or going though HR departments or "recruiters". All the better if you know the managers name and can mention that you heard about their company from a current or former employee.

Make sure your letter and CV are not only "corrected" by a literate native speaker, but totally rewritten by them in native-level English or Polish or whatever. This is one thing you cannot afford to skimp on. And the goal of it is to make you sound like a unique and interesting real person with valuable qualifications and experience, and not just another out-of-work loser still living with mom and dad. Concrete details and tangible enthusiasm are gold, and vague generalities and modesty are $hit, so be as concrete as you possibly can, and blow your own horn. Without rambling or being obnoxious, of course.

If you send out 500 letters, you'll probably get five or ten positive responses. That's incredibly high, and very, very time and cost effective. More so than using the stupid internet. Even today, people take words on paper a lot more seriously than words on the computer screen.

But all in all, if your degree is not a real engineering degree, I think that you would be better off reschooling while you are still young rather than spending the rest of your life regretting that you hadn't. Of you want to make money, you have to go where the money is, and that means probably not in the gaming industry, or in Poland.
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
23 Sep 2015 #86
Grzegorz & others,

Curious if you or anyone else knows how many young Russians are fluent in Polish:-)
DominicB - | 2,709
24 Sep 2015 #87
Curious if you or anyone else knows how many young Russians are fluent in Polish

Very few, of course. About the same percentage of young Poles that are fluent in Lithuanian, or maybe even Czech. Of course, since Russia does not border on Poland (except for the small and closed off Kaliningrad enclave), a fairer comparison would be to how many young Poles are fluent in Croatian, Serbian or Bulgarian. Or to how many young Germans are fluent in Polish.
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
24 Sep 2015 #88
Surprisingly enough, more than one might think. The universities of, I believe, Dortmund and one in Berlin, offer full programs (and chairs) in Polonistik aka Polish Studies:-)
DominicB - | 2,709
24 Sep 2015 #89
Which is about the same as the number of Polish universities that have departments that teach, say, Farsi. Now compare that to the number of universities in Poland that have German departments, or to the number of young Poles that are fluent in German. And then think about why that is the case.
Lyzko 33 | 8,153
24 Sep 2015 #90
Well, obviously!

The principal reason I studied Polish was because most of my Polish-speaking clientel spoke no English whatsoever.
German on the other hand, the majority had studied in school, had participated on study trips to the FRG and many knew it fluently:-) They preferred of course to converse/do business in their native tongue.

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