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If you were to compere Polish Unis and Unis/Colleges in your country...


delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
6 Dec 2010 #31
Btw what's the difference between AS and A2?

The A level is 2 years, and it's made up of the two components - AS and A2. Usually, what people do will be four AS levels, then they'll do three subjects at A2 level. It used to be only one big exam after 2 years, but they dropped this as it was seen to only be about exams and not about learning. Depends on the exam agency though, as some will have 100% exams for certain subjects, others won't.

But usually, you do coursework which makes up part of your grade, then exams at the end of the AS and A2 level. It really depends on subject though, and which exam board.

There's a trend for going back towards 100% exam though - too many people were getting "outside help" with coursework.

Something that's sometimes used in the UK in university is "timed exams" - you get 24 hours (or less, or more) to complete an exam paper, using any resources you wish. I quite like that, and it should be used in schools :)
OP zetigrek
6 Dec 2010 #32
The A level is 2 years, and it's made up of the two components - AS and A2.

Is AS somewhat easier than A2? I think I still don't understand.

Those A-levels seems to be on a level of Polish matura... I mean rather rozszerzona Matura.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
6 Dec 2010 #33
Is AS somewhat easier than A2? I think I still don't understand.

Yep - unlike Poland, the British system works on the later the year, the harder the difficulty. So - the AS is easier than the A2.

Likewise in university - each year gets progressively harder. So - the 3rd year of a BA will be much tougher than the 1st year, and an MA will always be more difficult than a BA. For me, it's odd that in Poland, the MA part can often be easier!
Marynka11 4 | 676
6 Dec 2010 #34
Americans usually translates Polish mgr degree as BA.

My mgr was translated into MA.
OP zetigrek
6 Dec 2010 #35
So - the AS is easier than the A2.

So I guess
AS is like polish matura podstawowa level
A2 is like polish matura rozszerzona level

It'll probably be very easy for you

yep, it's seems to be quite easy just like polish Matura.

Likewise in university - each year gets progressively harder. So - the 3rd year of a BA will be much tougher than the 1st year, and an MA will always be more difficult than a BA. For me, it's odd that in Poland, the MA part can often be easier!

It's because during your last years at uni you should get vocational experience and too much courses may make it too difficult. Also you write thesis and you should have time for that. That's why 1st and 2nd year are the hardest.
Harry
6 Dec 2010 #36
It's because during your last years at uni you should get vocational experience and too much courses may make it too difficult.

Not in an English BA/BSc course: those have 'sandwich' years where you actually do go and get your vocational experience (a mate of mine managed to fail his sandwich year).
Teffle 22 | 1,321
6 Dec 2010 #37
For me, it's odd that in Poland, the MA part can often be easier!

Very bizarre. It's seems contrary to the whole nature of education itself ?!
Havok 10 | 912
6 Dec 2010 #38
Hi ZY

People who study Engineering, Computer Science or Technology in general, are wasting their time in Poland. The same goes for majoring in Business over there, it's useless

On the other hand, Polish universities and other institutions of higher education have relatively inexpensive and very good education programs in Liberal Arts.

An example from real life to back up my claim:

Most people on PF are very good at writing "essays" :), "well educated", but when it comes down to a practical aspect of things it really shows that most of you have no real experience.

History, Politics, Sociology, Society etc. are the main subjects on PF.

Back to the US… Most self-respecting universities in the US hire teachers/professors with work experience, for example Ivy League universities prefer having on faculty established authorities in a given field of knowledge who proved themselves “in the real world". (earned some money doing it)

So my advice to you is, if you want to learn something useful and make money if the future, study overseas if you can.
OP zetigrek
6 Dec 2010 #39
Computer Science or Technology

No they don't because they easly find well-paid job in Poland and abroad.

very good education programs in Liberal Arts.

You've must be kiddin.

Most people on PF are very good at writing "essays" :), "well educated", but when it comes down to a practical aspect of things it really shows that most of you have no real experience.

You don't need to have higher education to carry such discussions.
Havok 10 | 912
6 Dec 2010 #40
No they don't because they easly find well-paid job in Poland and abroad

First of all you're going to be lucky if you get a job at all.
You're working for McDonalds now, right? What is your field of study, fast food?
If I was you I would try to get a student internship in the field of study, even if they didn't pay anything.
Get your foot in the door, be nice to everyone, get to know the people in the industry, learn quickly, and don’t fvck anyone for promises of advancement.

You've must be kiddin.

I kid you not

You don't need to have higher education to carry such discussions

It’s not what I meant.
OP zetigrek
6 Dec 2010 #41
Note that Polish IT specialists are highly valued everywhere. I know many people who graduated such faculty (at public unis, not private which sucks) and they work around the world. So if you don't know something stop talking bs.

You're working for McDonalds now, right? What is your field of study, fast food?

I don't understand your personal attacks on me.
If you have problem with anger management find a therapist...

If I was you I would try to get a student internship in the field of study, even if they didn't pay anything.

Havok, you've lost your connection with Poland long time ago, haven't you? INTERSHIPS ARE NEARLY ALWAYS NON-PAID. Hopely I persuaded your wife any ideas of returning to Poland... you should thank me ;D
southern 75 | 7,096
6 Dec 2010 #42
History, Politics, Sociology, Society etc. are the main subjects on PF.

So what?Should we talk about computers,economics and engineering?
Havok 10 | 912
6 Dec 2010 #43
Note that Polish IT specialists are highly valued everywhere. I know many people who graduated such faculty (at public unis, not private which sucks) and they work around the world. So if you don't know something stop talking bs.

Yup Polish IT specialists are highly valued everywhere because anyone would hire Wrocław University of Technology graduate over MIT or Universität Karlsruhe. See where the top engineering universities are in the world, for sure those ain't in Poland.

You’re like this hyperactive puppy jumping up and down trying to prove a point. Please shut up.

Havok, you've lost your connection with Poland long time ago, haven't you? INTERSHIPS ARE NEARLY ALWAYS NON-PAID. Hopely I persuaded your wife any ideas of returning to Poland... you should thank me ;D

Again, you're missing my point. I was trying to tell you that you should get an intership instead of working for McDonald's if you planing on getting a job right out of college.

Should we talk about computers,economics and engineering

i don't care, it's just an observation.
OP zetigrek
7 Dec 2010 #44
Yup Polish IT specialists are highly valued everywhere because anyone would hire Wrocław University of Technology graduate over MIT or Universität Karlsruhe. See where the top engineering universities are in the world, for sure those ain't in Poland.

But Polish studnets win prizes in prestigous competitions. I wouldn't say that becuase MIT is far famouse and high in ranks, it means that IT specialist from Poland sucks. Is it still too hard for you to understand?

Again, you're missing my point. I was trying to tell you that you should get an intership instead of working for McDonald's if you planing on getting a job right out of college.

Who said I'm working in McDonalds? It's obvious an attack on me.
southern 75 | 7,096
7 Dec 2010 #45
Yes,Americans are very good in specializing in one specific and often profitable area.
Havok 10 | 912
7 Dec 2010 #46
But Polish studnets win prizes in prestigous competitions. I wouldn't say that becuase MIT is far famouse and high in ranks, it means that IT specialist from Poland sucks. Is it still too hard for you to understand?

Yes,Americans are very good in specializing in one specific and often profitable area.

People get into engineering schools because they enjoy technology and want to make money later. In the US you compete with people all over the world, jack of all trades is not a good strategy here. Everyone needs the best specialist, whether it is an electrician, or a mechanic or a proctologist, lol... and that's what people pay for.

See it doesn't matter if Zenek from University of Wroclaw wins a competition, MIT has money for research and equipment that Polish Universities will never see.

People who graduate from MIT work on cutting edge research and develop the technology that Zenek's son will learn in about 22 years.

the first general-purpose computer was developed at University of Pennsylvania in 1940's. Poland hasn't seen a computer till the 80's. Same goes with other technology.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
7 Dec 2010 #47
You're working for McDonalds now, right?

And?

McDonalds is well known to be character building - and furthermore, it shows that you can follow procedures and processes, something valued by big corporate companies.

For what it's worth, I'd hire a Pole who worked in McDonalds anyday - it's hard work and usually managed by people with the attitude of "time to lean, time to clean". Furthermore, in a country where work experience is often seen as "omg, work experience, no way" - it shows a will to work.
jonni 16 | 2,485
7 Dec 2010 #48
But Polish studnets win prizes in prestigous competitions.

Especially mathematics - Warsaw is renowned for that.

A friend of mine at Uni got a job flipping burgers in the evenings and on Saturdays; they hired her on their graduate scheme and 25 years later she's a very senior manager for them at international level.
Marynka11 4 | 676
7 Dec 2010 #49
I hear the same thing.

I don't think Havok has issues with working at McDonalds. From what I understand he thinks an unpaid internship is better than a paid job at McDonalds. I'm with him on that. If a person doesn't have financial constraints they should always pick an internship, even if it's unpaid. The amount of practical knowledge you can learn "on-site" is really immense. Of course you will do a lot of filing and coffee fetching, but you will see how a company functions, and like Havok said, if you are nice and not picky about the work they give you, at some point someone will notice that you are willing to work and have skills and reward you with better projects. I did 2 unpaid internships when I was going to college in the US. After the second one they offered me a full time job, which I took. So another benefit...
jonni 16 | 2,485
7 Dec 2010 #50
he thinks an unpaid internship is better than a paid job at McDonalds.

The big question is, why do you eat and how do you pay the rent?
Marynka11 4 | 676
7 Dec 2010 #51
jonni, I said, "If a person doesn't have financial constraints", like for example the parents pay the rent and food. But if you have to pay your rent, you do what you have to do.
Havok 10 | 912
7 Dec 2010 #52
I'm just argumenting my point and at the same time I'm giving you insight on my experiences.

The big question is, why do you eat and how do you pay the rent?

Yes, you have to be resourceful, but don't invest too much time into mastering procedures and processes at McDonalds.

I don't think Havok has issues with working at McDonalds.

Thank you.

Especially mathematics - Warsaw is renowned for that.

I said that earlier, Polish Universities are good at teaching liberal arts.

"The term liberal arts denotes a curriculum that imparts general knowledge and develops the student’s rational thought and intellectual capabilities, unlike the professional, vocational and technical curricula emphasizing specialization. The contemporary liberal arts comprise studying literature, languages, philosophy, history, mathematics, and science"
jonni 16 | 2,485
7 Dec 2010 #53
jonni, I said, "If a person doesn't have financial constraints", like for example the parents pay the rent and food. But if you have to pay your rent, you do what you have to do.

You did indeed. I suppose I was lucky - back in the mid 80s I had a paid internship - this was normal in the UK then, and if I'd had to do an unpaid one, I could have claimed Social Security. Thatcher eventually stopped all that.

In Poland, I notice that GW runs competitions for internships in partnership with Blue Chip companies - I think they're paid.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Dec 2010 #54
The point is that it is really hard to compare when you haven't experienced both. Also, your experience is always going to be far too limited to make any kind of meaningful comparison.

That's why I have nothing to say other than that I hope the guys that negotiated Bologna did their homework.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
7 Dec 2010 #55
A friend of mine at Uni got a job flipping burgers in the evenings and on Saturdays; they hired her on their graduate scheme and 25 years later she's a very senior manager for them at international level.

From what I know, they're very good at promoting capable people up the ladder and fast. I don't actually know where the criticism comes from - it must be one of the very few employers that will give almost anyone a chance to suceed - along with offering a very clear career path.

Internships are fine and well if you've got the money to burn, but for most normal people, it's just not an option.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Dec 2010 #56
Is there sth like the milk round at Polish unis? There was where I studied. I wanted to do further study but I was pursued by some headhunters that come to the uni in order to assess your competence for their company. I decided to do further study. The milk round simply means that company reps come to further education institutions, looking to hire fresh blood as potential graduates. There are many graduate fairs too :)
OP zetigrek
7 Dec 2010 #57
The milk round simply means that company reps come to further education institutions, looking to hire fresh blood as potential graduates.

HAHA. No, of course there is no such thing in Poland. Actually there is no need of so many people with higher education so simply no one fight for a graduatee. It's the graduatees' task to find job/intership and no one helps them.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Dec 2010 #58
That's a lame situation. How about Careers Advisory Service options? They are inept, truth be told, but still can point you in the right direction when they feel like doing their job.
OP zetigrek
7 Dec 2010 #59
Careers Advisory Service options

On many Unis there are so called "Biura Karier". They are mostly servises with job/work/intership anouncements from employers and candidates as well (you can put there your CV).
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Dec 2010 #60
Better than nothing, I guess. Still, it does seem like a slugfest in Poland in order to get work. I'm glad that I studied a generic/vocational course, than an academic one. I was also helped by some professional services but they couldn't mask the reality that Scotland is a small country with far too many graduates and immigrants. My reality was to travel :)

Poland does seem like a 'fend for yourself' culture at times.


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