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I'm struggling with my culture - I grew up Polish in America. DNA test.


AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #1
Hi, I grew up polish in America but after taking a dna test I was crushed and saddened im only 20% polish and I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. Growing up my family on my mother's side was so proud to be polish. Every event was polish food and every holiday everyone got something polish, from hats to doormats it was a positive and healthy experience but now I feel like I have no where to celebrate or go. I feel like my life was a lie and my mom told me that I shouldn't feel bad or sad but somehow I do.
mafketis 16 | 6,145    
11 Sep 2018  #2
I grew up polish in America but after taking a dna test I was crushed and saddened im only 20% polish

Unlike some ethnicities, Polishness is largely based on culture (and language) and self-identification. I live in Poland and have come across people with Czech, German, Jewish, Ukrainian, Romanian, Greek and other names who self-identify as Polish and are regarded as such by everybody.

So the good news is that you're as Polish as many Poles.

What was the rest of your test (and you do realize they make up part of the results on those tests, don't you?)
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #3
It said I was 38% Europe west, 20% Europe east,18% Scandinavian and 14% Great Britain.
mafketis 16 | 6,145    
11 Sep 2018  #4
that isn't inconsistent with being Polish where everybody was invading, so (I'm guessing you have some German and Swedish ancestory - both countries have invaded Poland after all....)

Cheer up, you're as Polish as you want to be!
Ziemowit 12 | 3,074    
11 Sep 2018  #5
What specifically are those genes that define "Europe west" or "Europe east"? If these are the R1b genes or the R1a genes respectively, this is simply rubbish. About 60% of the Polish people have the R1a gene, so the remaining 40% of them would not be Polish?

The gene composition of a given population may tell us about the history of people's migrations, but not about people's nationalities.
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #6
Thank you! On my fathers side is german (I have a german last name but if I move to Poland I'm changing it to my mothers very polish maiden name) I'm just happy and proud to be apart of a very happy and positive culture of people where everyone is welcomed!
Atch 16 | 2,558    
11 Sep 2018  #7
Ziemowit is right, it's not as simple as Western European genes, or Scandanavian genes etc.

What I find interesting is the number of people whom we Europeans would consider 'American' but who don't seem to see themselves as American but rather need to indentify as some other nationality, in your case Alexandria, Polish. Why can't you just be happy with being American? America also has a distinct culture, even if it is a relatively new one and you are a part of that. Also, why not enjoy learning about the other bits of the mix of your genetic make-up. See it like this, it means that on some level, you belong in a lot of different places. By the way, there's no such thing as a Great Britain gene. You have can have Scottish, Welsh or English DNA but not British. The English DNA is somewhat different to the Scots and Welsh who are closer to the Irish.
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #8
In my opinion I'm a little embarrassed to be American. A lot of negative stuff goes on here and I feel in my heart that I do not belong. I'm going to college next year and I'm studying abroad to Athens Greece. I want to be apart of a rich heritage where it's still alive and not negative. To be American is very different then people make it to be. That's why I'm proud to be polish. My grandfathers grandparents came from Poland and they kept the culture and heirlooms alive and rich.
Atch 16 | 2,558    
11 Sep 2018  #9
My grandfathers grandparents came from Poland

So what you're saying is that one set of your great-great grandparents was Polish and that's why you choose to identify as Polish? Golly. That's very American!! The thing is, that the moment you open your mouth, people in Europe will see you as American. We always think it's a bit weird when Americans say 'I'm Italian" or "I'm Irish" or in this case Polish. To us, you're American, especially if the connection is so far back. What's your Greek connection?
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #10
My mom visited Poland once and was so amazed by their culture they way the were so friendly and whenever I'm down she tells me about her travels and how history is still alive and it's sad that in America a lot of our monuments are either destroyed,put away or overly protected.
mafketis 16 | 6,145    
11 Sep 2018  #11
who don't seem to see themselves as American but rather need to indentify as some other nationality,

Traditionally that's a regional thing, strongest in the modern Rust Belt (called 'the Foundry' in the Nine Nations model)*.

That''s where you had the Italian-American Greek-American etc. clubs. It was much more restricted in other parts, in New England there might be Portuguese and Irish identification, in the White South it was almost entirely absent (people might identify their heritage as English or Scottish but they didn't have clubs or anything.

It's been spread a little bit as people from that area go to other parts of the country so where I grew up (in the south but a migration destination for Northerners) by the 1980s you had Italian-American or German-American clubs but nowhere near as strong as in the Rust Belt.

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Nine_Nations_of_North_America
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #12
My Greek Connection is that I'm studying Greek mythology and I want to enrich the culture and my name is Greek. My mother named me after a feminist and I feel proud but yes I am American and I'm embarrassed because for the rest of my life I'll be labeled in different cultures as an fat lazy American who is culturally insensitive and it's sad that I'll be known as that.
Atch 16 | 2,558    
11 Sep 2018  #13
Alexandria, Polish people, like most nationalities are friendly to tourists but it's a very different situation if you live here. They're not an especially open or friendly people and it's quite a harsh society in many ways. Pretty much every country in Europe has amazing history compared to America because they're so much older.
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #14
So when I move out of the states will wherever I move be accepting and friendly after awhile because I can't live in America for personal beliefs and I don't want to move where I get dirty looks and rude remarks?
Atch 16 | 2,558    
11 Sep 2018  #15
Alexandria I don't know where you get the idea that Americans are despised all over the civilized world. They certainly aren't. You, as an individual, will be seen as whatever you present yourself to be. If you're a slim, intelligent, hard working person and people see you as fat and stupid, then you're mixing in the wrong circles.
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #16
Well to be fair American tv and books tell us that we are "hated everywhere" and there is no reason to move. You should see how everything is labeled and seen.It's quite sad how children grow up and are influenced a certain way.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,074    
11 Sep 2018  #17
By the way, there's no such thing as a Great Britain gene. You have can have Scottish, Welsh or English DNA but not British.

Indeed, even English DNA would not have been homogenous. I'm sure the gene composition of the population living in the north of England (former Danelaw) may differ substantially from the one of the population living in the south.

I wonder what stuff they sell to the client except for these percentages of his/her ancestry. Is it backed up with some more concrete information like the types of genes or not?
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #18
I do not know anything about dna I just took a test for curiosity.
mafketis 16 | 6,145    
11 Sep 2018  #19
Alexandria, the key in getting the most out of a trip (or long term move) to Europe is to keep your expectations in check. the more you build it up in your mind as great the more likely you are to be disappointed. the more you expect that there will be difficulties the better you can get through them.

Poland can be a great place to live for an American (like you and me) but you need to know the language (very well) and know how things work (it takes at least a year's residence before it starts making any sense).

Also remember Poland is a northern country and people are not sunny and bright. Polish people can be very harsh with each other in ways that might shock an American. And.... the more you're accepted as a local, the shorter and more confrontational people might be with you (treating you like they treat each other). I like to say that Poland can be a great assertiveness training school for wimpy Americans - you'll have to learn to stand up for yourself or you'll regret it.

The weather for almost half the year can be pretty gloomy too (and very rapid weather changes can take their toll if you're sensitive to things like air pressure changes like I am).

Like I said, it can be a great place to live but you need to remember that no place is perfect and learn how to deal with the downsides.

Poland (and Greece) are very pro-American so people won't have anything against you for being American.

I've only been to Greece a few times as a tourist (but I work with a few Greeks) and I've known Polish people who've lived there. Remember that Greece has been in an economic depression for the last 10 years with no real end in sight. It's very different culturally from Poland so anything you learn about "Europe" will not necessarily transfer to Poland.

Welcome to the forum but it does have some very negative and nasty non-Polish trolls (none on this thread so far).
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #20
Like I said I'm only going to Greece to study classics which makes since because it's based there. The whole point was me freaking out because In America everything has switched roles everything that was made fun of is now considered a beauty standard. For example brown or dark eyes are appreciated more but light eyes are not beautiful anymore. I have blonde hair and blue eyes and I had no culture because I thought I wasn't polish enough. I'm not saying I'm 100% polish. My family through out the years has celebrated it from my grandpa to my mom. It isn't something we started celebrating, we've had it for more then 78+ years.
Atch 16 | 2,558    
11 Sep 2018  #21
To be honest, you're starting to sound like you're a bit stoned. What time is it there?? Time for you to toddle off to bed Cinderella.
OP AlexandriaM3009 1 | 12    
11 Sep 2018  #22
Excuse me I am studying for my tests. 1. You don't know which side of the states I live on. 2 I am over 18 and I have the right to do what I want and 3 don't ever call me Cinderella.
Atch 16 | 2,558    
11 Sep 2018  #23
What tests are those? As the States are many hours behind us, regardless of which side you live on, it's late. Why do you object to being called Cinderella? She was blonde, blue eyed, beautiful and most importantly, she was good, kind and pure of heart - and she was European :D
Lyzko 18 | 5,086    
11 Sep 2018  #24
Alexandria,

You remind me of similar issues many other ethnicities go through when their children grow up here aka in the States, but their folks, family, are all from there aka Europe aka "The Old Country"!

Lots of German-Americans for example, born right in the US in places like Pennsylvania, Ohio etc. often complain they are identified as "German" because of their family name, yet feel and act culturally "American" which gets them into all sorts of culture-shock problems when interacting with their foreign-born relatives from Germany.
TheOther 5 | 3,531    
11 Sep 2018  #25
Defining oneself through DNA testing is pure nonsense; especially when talking about European origins. Far too much mixing going on over the millennia. Your genes don't make you Polish, British or German anyway. It's your upbringing.
Lyzko 18 | 5,086    
11 Sep 2018  #26
You're arguing nurture over nature, is that about it?

Some might argue that point:-)
TheOther 5 | 3,531    
11 Sep 2018  #27
Some might argue that point:

There's nothing to argue about. The DNA of each and every human is the result of a long line of different individuals/ ethnicities/ races (whatever rocks your boat) mixing with each other.
Dirk diggler 7 | 3,793    :-(
11 Sep 2018  #28
@AlexandriaM3009

Don't sweat it. Theres hundreds of thousands of poles in chicago and other parts of the usa that keep all the customs and many even speak the language but would probably be shockdd to find that theyre a mix of german polish lithuanian russian ukranian etc. I was born in pl and grew up in the us and i know for a fact i have lithuanian and probably some ukranian maybe even german mixed in with polish. It really doesnt matter. If you feel polish, keep the traditions, look like a polish/slavic woman which are more beautiful than any other women of any other ethnicities including westeen european women, than youre polish. So be happy and keep celebrating wigili, wearing papcie in the house, eating tons of pierogi and drinking kompot vodka herbata even when its warm outside etc etc

me freaking out because In America everything has switched roles everything that was made fun of is now considered a beauty standard

Dont let the liberals who hate white christians, eapecially slavs who hold true to our traditions and roots brainwash you. **** the diversity macht frei crowd. Theyre just jealous because at the end of the day blonde hair, blue eyes, white skin, tall etc will always be more beautiful. Its been the standard of beauty since ancient times. Even the black chicks amd latinos dye their hair blonde and end up looking like duracell batteries because they cant get it naturally. Asians get plastic surgery on their eyes to look more white. African girls even bleach rheir skin to look more white. Thats because white europeans especially those blondr hair blue eyes round faces and are tall will always be the standard of beauty worldwide, regardless of what people like Nancy pelosi who say her kid wishes he was brown because its so beautiful. Fts. Its just brainwashing, dont fall for it. Be proud of who you are, embrace it, dont let anyone make you think less of who you are and pass polish traditions onto your kids so they dont get lost. Slavic women are the most sought after hands down. Whens the last time a dude said hey im going to go to algeria or congo or korea or el salvador or uk to find a nice girl? Never. But you do hear all the time how men want women from poland, czechy, Ukraine, russia etc.
Miloslaw 8 | 741    
11 Sep 2018  #29
@Alexandria

Some of the extremists that you were warned about earlier are posting on here now.
Just ignore them.
If you're mum was Polish,you can identify as Polish.
Don't worry,just get on with it.
Dirk diggler 7 | 3,793    :-(
11 Sep 2018  #30
For example brown or dark eyes

.... i rest my case.. another example is 'fat shaming' most people dont want to date a fat chick, save for some black guys who love fat white girls, but most people think being fat looks bad and is unhealthy but God forbid you say that or criticize someones fat ass... then you're fat shaming... more liberal pc marxist bs...

Everything i wrote is fact. Asian Latino black women all do things to make themselves look more white. Even black dudes go for white women soon as rhey have enough cash and or fame.

Its just liberals who unfortunatelt make white european girls like our blonde blue eyed poster question their beauty when in reality its only msm posturing to make minorities feel better about themselves and people like nancy pelosi talkinf about beautiful brown skin simply to get voters as theres more brown people than whites in commiefornia



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