The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / USA, Canada  % width posts: 698

Why are Polish restaurants not successful in the USA?


Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
15 Jul 2011 #61
Dutch restaurants aren't successful in the USA? (Or German restaurants??)

I have never seen a Dutch restaurant here. German restaurants were once very popular here as German cuisine was considered the apex of so called "comfort food", but their popularity has been declining according to a a radio program I heard recently. There is a chain of German restaurants in Southern California called Hoff's Hut and I found the food there rather unpalatable but no worse than similarly priced chain restaurants like Denny's.
A J 4 | 1,088
15 Jul 2011 #62
I was so angry at myself that I didn't choose to have a barbecue instead with some bratwursts.

Indeed. What a life-altering experience. I hope you're not traumatized? You should seek professional help after going through something as dramatic as that. I can only imagine what it must've been like for you!

I have never seen a Dutch restaurant here.

OMG! American people are so racist!!

xD
jyjkhfa
15 Jul 2011 #63
I remember one Saturday I wasted there when I ordered kielbasa.

Barbequed kiełbasa in a restaurant menu? Are you sure it was a restaurant?
OP Rebirth
15 Jul 2011 #64
German restaurants were once very popular

German restaurants are still a lot more popular than Polish restaurants. Frankenmuth alone probably makes more revenue than all Polish restaurants in the US combined.

Barbequed kiełbasa in a restaurant menu? Are you sure it was a restaurant?

I didn't say the kielbasa was barbecued.
A J 4 | 1,088
15 Jul 2011 #65
German restaurants are still a lot more popular than Polish restaurants.

Why? I mean, WHY??? (!!) No, WHY!???

xD
jyjkhfa
15 Jul 2011 #66
erman restaurants were once very popular here as German cuisine

Excuse me but I still dodn't get the answer what's a trademark of German cuisine. In Poland people associate German cuisine with a leg of pork with a beer - nothing sophisticated, typically razzle-dazzle kind of dish. Austrian cuisine is a different story though.

So what kind of dish would you suggest me if I ever were to visit a German restaurant?
pgtx 30 | 3,156
15 Jul 2011 #67
German restaurants are still a lot more popular than Polish restaurants.

so you have any valid info about what is popular and where? you know, outside of Connecticut?
A J 4 | 1,088
15 Jul 2011 #68
So what kind of dish would you suggest me if I ever were to visit a German restaurant?

Kartoffel Salat und Gerolsteiner Sprüdel!

xD
Marynka11 4 | 676
15 Jul 2011 #69
So what kind of dish would you suggest me if I ever were to visit a German restaurant?

Jägerschnitzel is my German favorite.

My other half loves Sauerbraten with potato damplings.
southern 75 | 7,096
15 Jul 2011 #70
Polish cuisine cannot compete with mediteranean one.It is worse than czech and hungarian which are kings in central Europe.Only polish soups have potential.Polish food makes sense when you drink quatities of beer otherwise it is tasteless.German food is boring meant to keep you at work not as a pleasure as it isthe case in France,Italy and other mediteranean countries.
A J 4 | 1,088
15 Jul 2011 #71
German food is boring meant to keep you at work not as a pleasure as it isthe case in France,Italy and other mediteranean countries.

Not too long ago, I've enjoyed a French cheese which smelled like sweaty feet. (It even out-smelled my own socks, which I didn't wash for two days!)

;P
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jul 2011 #72
What do the Czechs have, southern? Polish fare, while often bland without salt, can still match anything the Czechs have.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
15 Jul 2011 #73
Austrian cuisine is a different story though.
So what kind of dish would you suggest me if I ever were to visit a German restaurant?

I would suggest their Potato salad. Sauerkraut is also considered a signature German dish but I dislike it and can't in good conscience recommend it, nor will I, for ethical reasons, recommend the most pricey thing on German restaurants' menus which is a breaded veal dish which has a name in German which I have forgotten.
jyjkhfa
15 Jul 2011 #74
Jägerschnitzel is my German favorite.

My other half loves Sauerbraten with potato damplings.

Piece of meat and damplings. Nothing sophisticated... just like the Polish cuisine.
A J 4 | 1,088
15 Jul 2011 #75
What do the Czechs have, southern? Polish fare, while often bland without salt, can still match anything the Czechs have.

Which country invented Goulash again?

;)
pgtx 30 | 3,156
15 Jul 2011 #76
Sauerkraut is also considered a signature German dish but I dislike it and can't in good conscience recommend it, nor will I, for ethical reasons, recommend the most pricey thing on German restaurants' menus which is a breaded veal dish which has a name in German which I have forgotten.

you don't have to go to a German restaurant to eat those... it's served everywhere...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jul 2011 #77
Dumplings, not damplings ;) Be careful with dumplings as native speakers might seen them as pierogi or kluski so please be precise.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
15 Jul 2011 #78
Which country invented Goulash again?

Isn't it Hungary?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jul 2011 #79
It sure is. When I hear a Pole say gulasz or bogracz are Polish, I have to laugh. Leczo for that matter too
jyjkhfa
15 Jul 2011 #80
Sauerkraut

kapusta kiszona? I thought it's a Polish signature dish ;)
Marynka11 4 | 676
15 Jul 2011 #81
Piece of meat and damplings. Nothing sophisticated... just like the Polish cuisine.

Just like most European cuisines. You asked for food recommendation, not to sweep you off your feet :)
A J 4 | 1,088
15 Jul 2011 #82
Isn't it Hungary?

That's what I was thinking, but I wasn't dead sure.. Anyway, in my most humble opinion, Goulash rules central Europe. (Sorry folks!)

:)
jyjkhfa
15 Jul 2011 #83
Dumplings, not damplings ;) Be careful with dumplings as native speakers might seen them as pierogi or kluski so please be precise.

kluski śląskie. Another thing which Poles eat on daily basis.
I'm looking forward to hear from Rebirth what's his favorite dish in those German restaurants...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jul 2011 #84
The French will be appalled at you saying that, A J ;)
Monia
15 Jul 2011 #85
Polish cuisine cannot compete with mediteranean one.

Your kebab dishes can`t compete with Polish cuisine because it is too monotonous .

I do not see anything fancy about such cuisine I see nothing special with a piece of meat impaled upon a stick, a piece of bread with some filling on the top , or pasta with sauce ( italian ).
southern 75 | 7,096
15 Jul 2011 #86
What do the Czechs have, southern?

They have goulash,veprovy ryzek and svickovou.Typical knedli a zeli.

Polish fare, while often bland without salt, can still match anything the Czechs have.

Exactly this is the problem they cannot match the czech food because they change the flavors.Poles make everything sweet saur.Have you tasted polish goulash?You wonder what kind of freak created this disgrace out of the famous hungariand and czech goulash.The same is true for all foods(pizza with corn etc) Poles tend to change everything to the worse but maybe this is their taste.(for example they prefer canned ogurki to fresh ones).
jyjkhfa
15 Jul 2011 #87
Goulash rules central Europe.

it's the same thing with gołąbkis - you can find it in many coutries' national cuisine menu. However it doesn't mean that they have no right to claim to be their traditional food too.
Palivec - | 380
15 Jul 2011 #88
Excuse me but I still dodn't get the answer what's a trademark of German cuisine. In Poland people associate German cuisine with a leg of pork with a beer - nothing sophisticated, typically razzle-dazzle kind of dish. Austrian cuisine is a different story though.
So what kind of dish would you suggest me if I ever were to visit a German restaurant?

German cuisine is a bad as Polish, Dutch or Skandinavian... simply the wrong latitude for good food.
If you want something German stick to bread, sausages and cakes, everything else sucks, so the best tip is to go to a bakery.
In a restaurant you should try "Rouladen" and Thuringian dumplings (Kloesse), a simple Schnitzel and Bratkartoffeln (home fries) or Bauernfrühstück (better version of Bratkartoffeln). There are some good, sophisticated dishes, like Leipziger Allerlei, but in America you don't get them anyway.
Marynka11 4 | 676
15 Jul 2011 #89
for example they prefer canned ogurki to fresh ones

Forgot about the hard Polish winters?
Natasa 1 | 580
15 Jul 2011 #90
Isn't it Hungary?

Hungarian, yes.


Home / USA, Canada / Why are Polish restaurants not successful in the USA?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.