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Do many Polish people in America hate Americans?


JohnP - | 210
8 Dec 2007  #31
Just thought I would chip in, I believe the average American doesn't travel to other countries not because he/she doesn't want to, but rather because he/she is simply unable to afford it or does not have time. American industry is very strict and tight with "vacation" compared to many European and other nations. Many jobs do not give time off at all, and others require workers to work for a considerable number of years before granting enough time to actually see anything. So many of the people who do get to travel abroad are either students, in between, retired, or, compared to the masses, a little better-off financially. These generally do not represent what most Americans are, however they are what many perceive us as.

One of my first jobs here was as a minimum wage laborer in a factory making high-end furniture; one had to work for two solid years before being allowed one week off work. As I recall, after 10 years, it was raised to two weeks. While there are companies that pay better, etc. most still do not provide large quantities of "off" time for their employees to go sample Europe, etc. in most cases.

The only times I've been lucky enough to be in Europe (once for 3 hours and then again for 2 days) were in Germany, and I had to be going to/from a war to do it.

Sorry. I just think many people have a mistaken idea about Americans and what makes us tick. We'd LOVE to go hang out in Poland, UK, Russia, Italy, Spain, wherever....but for most of us, that's only something we can dream about. It's just unfortunate that the opinions of most in the world seem to be made based on the actions of just a few non representative, usually slightly more privileged, examples of our citizenry.

One day, if I'm lucky and keep working hard, I can hope to become one of those traveled few.
marek s - | 269
8 Dec 2007  #32
But when someone tells them to go back to Poland, they don't want to..

you sure hit that right on the head

not everyone care about other parts of the world.

Most Americans believe what they see on TV more than they would believe their own parents

wrong

How about learning about new, NON-Americanized, culture, way of life, people, news-media, food, even shops?

above is you telling Americans what to do, what makes you so smart?

when we do travel in mass, we invade other countries.
Curtis 3 | 73
8 Dec 2007  #33
not everyone care about other parts of the world.

Thats what it's like in england, anyone who hasn't lived here and was born here is like an alien to most british people... rediculous how people don't realise that it's possible to move. Narrow minded people.
krysia 23 | 3,059
8 Dec 2007  #34
Just thought I would chip in, I believe the average American doesn't travel to other countries not because he/she doesn't want to.

You are so right. After 10 years working for the US federal goverment I finally got my 2.5 weeks vacation!Woohoo!
There is not always enough time to travel anywhere abroad and it is expensive. Most often people go on fishing trips or relax in the mountains or the beach.

You may see people in new homes in America, but they're not theirs. They belong to the bank. People have a 30 year mortgages, If they don't pay it, their house will get forclosed. The cars are on loans. So it looks like they are rich, while in reality they own nothing.
marek s - | 269
8 Dec 2007  #35
im lucky enough i guess to travel if i so wanted to.
for me personally i much prefer to go to vegas.
when i vacation, im all about debauchery and gluttony, why go anywhere but vegas?
Matt1
8 Dec 2007  #36
I think it started from immigration quoutas in 1924. Poland got some 4000.
Europenians hate Americans most. Some say Hollocaust happen becouse
Adolf Hitler had to do alinia under 1924 law as German.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,700
8 Dec 2007  #37
I finally got my 2.5 weeks

yeah, I hear that one, mine is in spurts.. like this weekend, I get 4 day weekend, but
its so close to christmas who can travel? and where I work, they dont let us take
any vacation time from dec 15th to jan 5th because staffing is so bad.

so people call off if they want the extra days.. they dont win either way..
me I always work,, have to have that time and half plus double time :))
Matt1
8 Dec 2007  #38
What always bothered me why 50% of US scientists could be foreign spies.
Russia and China saturates science departments most.
Never uderstood this as German.
marek s - | 269
8 Dec 2007  #39
what the fuk does this have to do with this topic
Matt1
8 Dec 2007  #40
It is difficult to start as Polish in the US. They have bad schools. Maybe under EU
now they improved. No money, computers, AC. Students have no cars.
Every day logistics is essential to get a good grade.
Dorms are crowded. Very few rich live in rented appartments alone.
In the US every undergrad and grad student has a laptop.
Computers labs have always about 64 computers or above.
Are very strong in science. Some build nuclear reactors at home.
In schools they write essays by hand. No typing. Universities have no journals.
I was once Pathfinder mission at one of their schools.
Try to take GRE after Polish abitur, considered by France a collaege exam and
you see. The solving speed is 1:10.

what the fuk does this have to do with this topic

No I mean Americans may hate other nations if they may spy on them.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
8 Dec 2007  #41
In the US every undergrad and grad student has a laptop.

Depends on individual circumstance. Also, Poles are very resilient, often not used to what Americans consider basic needs (5 cars per 3 member family, fast food etc)

They have bad schools.

I studied in Poland, US and Canada. My daughter went through highschool here. In other words I do have some real experience. I'd say Polish schools compare favorably with North American schools.

What schools in Poland did you go to?

No money

True in many cases. I came to the US with $10. That's all my (communist) government allowed me to take out of Poland.

computers

Not as many as Americans per capita, but sufficient number to allow some Polish universities (COSC departments) to be rated ahead of top notch US and Canadian ones.

AC

What does limited access to AC in Poland have to do with success in the US?

Dorms are crowded. Very few rich live in rented appartments alone.

Have you seen dorms at Fordham in NYC? (one of the best schools btw.)

Try to take GRE after Polish abitur, considered by France a collaege exam and
you see. The solving speed is 1:10.

And yet, in spite of all the ammenities available to American students, you still make spellling errors?
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #42
And yet, in spite of all the ammenities available to American students, you still make spellling errors?

After being deported from the US I repatriated to my fatherland Germany.
I am learning German. It iterfers. Had always D+ is Polish anyway.
Must write slower. Oh you always have Microsoft Word to check the spelling.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
9 Dec 2007  #43
After being deported from the US I repatriated to my fatherland Germany.
I am learning German.

Fatherland? And you are learning German only now?

Oh you always have Microsoft Word to check the spelling.

Didn't you say Poles have no computers?
Don't you have one or two?
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #44
What does limited access to AC in Poland have to do with success in the US?

I mean Air Conditioning not the electricity. You cannot think if
you cannot breath.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
9 Dec 2007  #45
I mean Air Conditioning not the electricity.

Same here. Some people do have AC in their homes in Poland. The climate is different, not as humid as in many US states.

You cannot think if
you cannot breath.

Excuses, excuses :)
In Poland they don't use their lungs to think. For some reason they decided brains are better suited for the purpose.
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #46
Not as many as Americans per capita, but sufficient number to allow some Polish universities (COSC departments) to be rated ahead of top notch US and Canadian ones.

I am quite sceptical. I graduated Warsaw University of Technology first in 1991.
After that was working in restaurants, cleaning cars to scrap for the ticket
to the US. Poland was no communist at that time. Maybe now Germany will give
cash to uprage as they did to Portugal.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
9 Dec 2007  #47
It says a little about you, but not about Warsaw University of Technology.

I graduated from Wroclaw University, Dept. of English Philology and I was invited to an Ivy League School in the US. And hey, Wroclaw University wasn't even considered a very good one for English studies at the time. You must have done poorly at school, didn't you?

Here where I live, a local university has a small computer science department. Three of the profs. are Poles (graduates of Warsaw University and Silesian University) Top rated computer department in Canada (Waterloo University) employs even more Polish profs. The general buzz is that Waterloo is so hard and so good because the Polish profs won't allow students to just squeeze through.

Don't blame the school. Blame yourself.

Maybe now Germany will give
cash to uprage as they did to Portugal.

Brains can hardly be upgraded for cash. If you ain't got it then you ain't got it.
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #48
I studied in Poland, US and Canada. My daughter went through highschool here. In other words I do have some real experience. I'd say Polish schools compare favorably with North American schools.

I grade schools overwhole. It is true. Some US high schools and Universities
do math worse at olimpiads. But if you have to spend 2 hours commuting by trains
and trams at rain or snow its all gone. You look different at US academia when you
always can park your Rolls-Roys and yet pay for it.
After graduating Polish University to reduce it to college, I have sent some
twenty five thousand applications to get to graduate School with straight As from
Poland.

Fatherland? And you are learning German only now?

It happens. If I spoke I would graduate Ludwik Maximilian in Muenchen.
It is the best one.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
9 Dec 2007  #49
But if you have to spend 2 hours commuting by trains
and trams at rain or snow its all gone.

Bull$hit. I'd be so happy if I could commute to work on train or bus. Instead I have to spend 45 minutes in a damn car, and that's just one way. I could read about 50 pages of a book in that time.

You look different at US academia when you
always can park your Rolls-Roys and yet pay for it.

I really don;t get it. Are we talking about wealth or quality education?

After graduating Polish University to reduce it to college, I have sent some
twenty five thousand applications to get to graduate School with straight As from
Poland.

Wow! Shouldn;t you have been doing some research instead of typing 25,000 applications? What a fvcking waste of time! See, I sent 0 (that's zero) applications but I was asked to come to the US.

Again, don't blame the school. Blame yourself.

You know what your problem is?
You don't concentrate on yourself or on your own studies and work. Instead you rely on the reputation of a school you did, or will attend. That reputation, however, is not yours, it that of generations before you and perhaps of some of the current one. With thta attitude you will remain mediocre whether you have a diploma from Bialystok or from MIT.

Kant was a prof at an obscure university. He didn't care, but he had something to say and everybody has been listening since.
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #50
It was 91. Now you can go to Cambrigde which is the best in Europe. Now
it is free if you still hold Polands or EU passport, since 1 May of 2004, the Polands EU membership.
Before, you were not patron and overseas student so you had to pay the
full tuition.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
9 Dec 2007  #51
I went in 1987. Not only Poland wasn't in EU but it was still under the soviet boot. I didn't pay a penny for my studies. In addition to that I had some problems getting my student records out of Poland. Your argument doesn't hold water.

If you succeed, feel free to claim all the credit for yourself. If you fail, don't blame others.
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #52
I went in 1987. Not only Poland wasn't in EU but it was still under the soviet boot. I didn't pay a penny for my studies. In addition to that I had some problems getting my student records out of Poland. Your argument doesn't hold water.

But communists had this law like Sweeden now. If you emigrated for ever you should have
paid the costs of eduaction. I was some 100000 $. There was an act but its now canceled.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
9 Dec 2007  #53
But communists had this law like Sweeden now. If you emigrated for ever you should have
paid the costs of eduaction.

Why would I tell them I was emigrating forever? How could I know?
You need some serious counselling on every day life issues.
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #54
No I mean if you wanted to work for US governement. It is very complicated.
US had collaborations with Communist Poland. Some wanted to know
if you owe sth.

I mean if you live Sweeden without sailing permit in this sense you cannot
visit your family etc. The Swedish treasury if after you like for taxes.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
9 Dec 2007  #55
I agree. It is all supremely compilcated. You left 1991 and Poland was communist at the time?

Matt, your story, since you started posting here has never made sense to me. Now even less so.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,700
9 Dec 2007  #56
After being deported from the US I repatriated to my fatherland Germany.
I am learning German.

well apparently your doing something in the united states that warranted your
deportation.. and possibly suspicious too. I find your posts suspicious because you
said father land was germany yet your learning it??

you make no sense, my thoughts are you are from muslim country of some sort.
or someplace else, with talk of spying and all. seems really funny, but hey.. I could
be wrong..
sana 2 | 48
9 Dec 2007  #57
JohnP- I am shocked about so limited time off. When I had my intervie for first job here in Sweden I stated from the beginig that I am planning a week holidays in June and two weeks holidays in August. I got the job and it was summer job. Plus at the end of the seson my boyfriend was turning 30 so I took another 3 days off. Now I work somwere else and planning a lot of trips, for next year 4 days in Krakow, 4 in Zakopane, 2weeks for the wedding plus our honey moon 2 weeks. After a year you entiteld to 25 days paid holidays and all the exta you want it si unpaid. I am sorry but that must be horrible like not bieng free, I am really surrprised!!
JohnP - | 210
9 Dec 2007  #58
No big deal. People here in the US make the best of the time we get, also. I imagine if for everyone in Europe traveling to another country meant 20 hours by plane and a month's pay for the ticket, more people in Europe would also vacation locally, not mentioning just the time. There are plenty of people who get time off in the U.S. but for the most part the U.S. is not as socialized as perhaps some nations in Europe, and the average worker here, given the option of spending a huge amount of money and flying himself and his family (or her family, as the case may be) to Europe for the one or two weeks most here get-or spending much less, and staying in the U.S. for a fraction of the cost, and basking somewhere on a beach, camping in the mountains, skiing, or whatever....that trip to Europe gets pushed back farther and farther.

I'm rambling but I'm sure you get the idea. It's not that Americans are uninterested in the rest of the world, but a vacation in another country long enough to mean anything is out of reach for most Americans.

My grandfather grew up in Krakow, some day I would like to visit there; if I stay in the armed forces long enough to retire, and if I am lucky enough that by that time Poland is still friendly enough to the U.S. that there are U.S. military flights to somewhere near that I can hop onto-I plan to do exactly that.

But I'm getting a bit off-topic. I really don't know what Poles here think of us, and it has little to do with my desires to visit Europe for longer than a refueling stop on the way to one place or other that generally isn't fun.

John P.
Matt1
9 Dec 2007  #59
I agree. It is all supremely compilcated. You left 1991 and Poland was communist at the time?

I really dont know. I am German citizen only using Polish passport becouse never planned
to leave the US farther then to Mexico or Canada and had bad luck to be born in
Warschaw.
I tking Adam Michnik says it was communist till 1992, my my first students visa was
SPLExes like chinees yet in 1992. It has SPLEX on it.

Matt, your story, since you started posting here has never made sense to me. Now even less so.

What makes no sence. That since my deportation after PhD you have to hide in
the US lfrom ordinary police ike in Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete from Gestapo.

I agree. It is all supremely compilcated. You left 1991 and Poland was communist at the time?

I really dont know. I am German citizen only using Polish passport because never planned
to leave the US farther then to Mexico or Canada and had bad luck to be born in
Warschaw.
I tking Adam Michnik says it was communist till 1989, my my first students visa was
SPLExes like chinees yet in 1992. It has SPLEX on it.
marek s - | 269
9 Dec 2007  #60
What makes no sence. That since my deportation after PhD you have to hide in
the US lfrom ordinary police

if you were legal why would you hide??


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