The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / USA, Canada  % width posts: 136

Moving from United Kingdom to USA. Is it worth it?


Kumbins 1 | 7
25 Jul 2011 #1
Hi. I've been working in London for the last six years as an electrical estimator for an electrical contractor. My permament job is perfect and I have no doubt about it but there is a housing problem in London. I mean the property price is enormous and even saving the money for a deposit is out of my scope. I've got two kids so i'ts the highest time to start thinking about my permament place of residence. What about the USA property buying situation ? I consider leaving for Australia or USA, but I'm not sure if I qualify for an employer sponsored visa to USA (if there is an option like that at all), by the way employers from AU can sponsor a full relocation package. Is there a chance to find an american employer who is willing to sponsor and relocate you ?
pgtx 29 | 3,159
25 Jul 2011 #2
electrical contractor

as for a work/business related visa to the US, you have to find an employer who is willing to hire and sponsor you, this employer has to prove that only you are good for this job and no American can do that better than you. And also, most important, you need to have a diploma from a grad school.
peterweg 36 | 2,320
25 Jul 2011 #3
I'd say you have no chance of getting a visa. Australia is a better bet, I think your trade might qualify, but you will have to check.
valpomike 11 | 197
25 Jul 2011 #4
Why do you want to move anyway?

Mike
OP Kumbins 1 | 7
25 Jul 2011 #5
Thanks for a quick answer :). I suppose it would be easier to prove that I've been born on the moon as each american estimator can do the job. So does it mean that a potential employer have to hire unemployed registered american estimator with little or no experience rather than (for example) myself with six years of experience ? It sound all right according to USA trade unions but not for me :)...In simple words is it possible to prove that I'm usefull for them ?
pgtx 29 | 3,159
25 Jul 2011 #6
So does it mean that a potential employer have to hire unemployed registered american estimator with little or no experience rather than (for example) myself with six years of experience ?

yes, US labor market has to protect its fellow citizens first...
OP Kumbins 1 | 7
25 Jul 2011 #7
Well...London is a nice place for a hard working horse but it's not the best place under the sun to grow up (I mean my children...). The property price is very high too. Anyway I always "loved" USA according to Hollywood films (especially with Clint Eastwood ;) ). Honestly I have to decide where to live for the next 20 years (or more) before my young ones start going to the school.
Wroclaw Boy
25 Jul 2011 #8
Moving from United Kingdom to USA. Is it worth ?

all depends how much money you have, the US has the best and worst of everything. Have you ever been to the States?
pip 10 | 1,661
25 Jul 2011 #9
You would probably have better luck with Canada.
Pinching Pete - | 558
25 Jul 2011 #10
Anyway I always "loved" USA according to Hollywood films

Careful man, Hollywood is a business. That's their job to make you love them.

You would probably have better luck with Canada.

Probably true.. decent amount of jobs there too. Then he can always drive down to the US to see what he's missing / or avoiding. :- D

Good luck whatever you do.
vato loco - | 15
25 Jul 2011 #11
The US economy is in the doldrums. Official unemployment is 9.2 percent but many economists & labor analysts believe the true number is closer to 16 percent. You might be better off in Canada or Australia...
legend 3 | 664
25 Jul 2011 #12
I think Canada is your best bet also.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
25 Jul 2011 #13
Sounds a great place, but isn't it quite hard to get into?
legend 3 | 664
25 Jul 2011 #14
If you are from Western Europe or the US it should be easier then from elsewhere.
To become a citizen you need to live in Canada for 3-5 years.
And theres a test about your knowledge of Canada as well.
pip 10 | 1,661
25 Jul 2011 #15
here is the thing. U.S economy is in the toilet. You can make good money in your profession, however, in the states you need to pay for health care insurance- so unless you are super rich or super poor- you will not benefit.

If you go to Canada- you will find that the system is much like England. Health care is covered through taxes. The banking system in Canada is much different that in the states. Our banks are not private businesses- they are regulated by the gov't- which means we didn't have the huge crash like the states did.

Some great cities are Vancouver (property is more expensive in the city centre) but the weather, ocean, mountains are gorgeous. Calgary is gorgeous and is experiencing a boom. My hometown of Ottawa is a great city, really beautiful and clean and no factories around. They also are a bilingual city- which is great.

If the weather is too harsh for you- I would recommend Australia. not the states. sorry, but you will be working poor if you immigrate there.
RysiekK 6 | 38
25 Jul 2011 #16
You will DEFINETLY NOT need a diploma from a Grad School. You will need to pass a test in the State you would be working . As an electrical contractor, you may have an easier time getting hired ( just my opinion and the local newspaper ads). If you get your contractors license here you may do VERY well being self-employed at some point. Even though the economy is not doing well, electricity is something we all use! Good luck and do a little research on licensing requirements in the State you may choose. They will also hire the best person for the job (or the one they can afford), not American first. If you're good , you'll can make some GREAT money in your field!
isthatu2 4 | 2,704
26 Jul 2011 #17
but there is a housing problem in London.

Then move out of chuffin London then ! :)
Its a bigger country than just that there grubby dump darn saff :)
Vaasa 3 | 14
26 Jul 2011 #18
You would be better off trying Canada, Australia, or New Zealand. Australia seems to be in the midst of a fairly big housing boom, so buying a home may not be the most affordable option there. And there are parts of Canada where housing prices have gone up quite a bit and so may not be as affordable as you want. Health care will be more affordable in both countries, and primary education for your kids will be better in both countries as well.

But certainly there are options elsewhere in the UK aren't there? London is expensive, but I know Edinburgh is still growing. No matter what your choice, I would make sure you do a lot of research first and then visit the country before making any significant moves.
beckski 12 | 1,617
26 Jul 2011 #19
So does it mean that a potential employer have to hire unemployed registered american estimator with little or no experience rather than (for example) myself with six years of experience ?

The job market in the United States, is currently highly competitive and somewhat brutal. Numerous experienced potential employees, including skilled workers, professionals, educators, etc. are struggling to succeed in gaining employment. There are companies that practice unfair business practices, such as hiring employees on the basis of favoritism and nepotism. The motto for some workplaces seems to be, "It's not what you know. It's who you know."
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
26 Jul 2011 #20
Hi. I've been working in London for the last six years as an electrical estimator for an electrical contractor. My permament job is perfect and I have no doubt about it but there is a housing problem in London.

Canada is economically doing better than the states due to oil. Canada exports the stuff. Only drawback is brutal and long winters. Weather wise Western Canada would be my choice, Calgary and all points West.

Working in the States? Well being an electrical contractor you can forget California, Florida, Arizona, Nevada. If you're Polish speaking Chicago may work, but Texas and the Plains States have better economies. North Dakota oil fields are booming, probably your best shot but weather is Canadian-like. Contact State of North Dakota Job Service Center. You can get them on the net, here: jobsnd.com
pip 10 | 1,661
26 Jul 2011 #21
Canada is economically doing better than the states due to oil. Canada exports the stuff. Only drawback is brutal and long winters. Weather wise Western Canada would be my choice, Calgary and all points West.

this is so wrong. we are better economically because our system is not set up like the U.S. Canada is partially socialist- meaning you have a safety net to fall back on, much like the U.K. As for the cold- depends where you live. Vancouver is amazing and they don't get too cold. Halifax is beautiful too- not too cold either, both comparable to winters in England.

But again, if you don't like the weather- Australia has a mass immigration campaign- probably less red tape to go through.
Llamatic - | 144
26 Jul 2011 #22
The US housing market is great for buyers right now. The best it's been in a long time. The jobs market, not so much.
OP Kumbins 1 | 7
26 Jul 2011 #23
Easy to say but even if I move out of London it takes ages to get to work in the City as there is a dense traffic. In practise this means I'll be spending much more money and time to travel. In London I can hardly afford a two bed flat on the tenth floor which isn't a dream option for me (maybe I wish to much...). I know there is no heaven on the earth but I want to try to find something cheaper (even in US) anyway :)...It's hard to find out what is good in this case.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
26 Jul 2011 #24
pip wrote:

here is the thing. U.S economy is in the toilet. You can make good money in your profession, however, in the states you need to pay for health care insurance- so unless you are super rich or super poor- you will not benefit.

why?

the guy's a professional, has a good job and if he lands a good job in the USA, he will pay next to nothing for medical insurance, the corporation pays for nearly all of it. my first job out of college, i paid $25/month for full coverage.

don't buy into the myth that americans all go broke because of health insurance costs. it's a broken system, sure, but most americans are quite happy with their health insurance and most pay very little for it. corporations pay nearly all of the tab and if you have a govt. job, even better.

also, let's look at the OP. his main concern is property cost and in the USA, real estate is considerably cheaper, especially if you stay out of California or the NY area. in the southeast, you can buy a house less than 10 years old, 150-220 sq. meters, 1/3 acre of land, for under $100,000, or about 61,000 pounds.
OP Kumbins 1 | 7
26 Jul 2011 #25
Yes, that's the point. If I get a permament job offer (or not...), my first task will be finding a cheap house (not a flat...) to rent and then I'll do research to buy something which is a little bit better idea than a tenth floor, two bed flat (in a block of flats) in London for about 150.000£ (246.000$)...I reached London to gain the experience but not to stay here forever. The only worry I have is that I may not find as nice and friendly employer like the present one again and that my mother who is 55 years old would have to stay in London alone as I don't think she will be granted with a visa...
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
26 Jul 2011 #26
Kumbins wrote:

The only worry I have is that I may not find as nice and friendly employer like the present one....

jobs come and go, man. they come and go. here today, gone tomorrow. i wouldn't base my life decisions on how "nice" my current employer is.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
26 Jul 2011 #27
London is a nice place for a hard working horse but it's not the best place under the sun to grow up (I mean my children...).

London is not the only place in the UK to live, plenty of nice villages to raise children that are accessible to cities, again not just London...

Have a look at the points calculator for Aus and see if you qualify, but please be aware major cities in Aus house prices are expensive and cost of living is not cheap either...

How about Canada instead of the US? A friend of mine emigrated there (she already had citizenship having lived there most of her childhood) with her family (she has two little boys) and she loves it and will never come back to the UK.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
26 Jul 2011 #28
How about Canada instead of the US? A friend of mine emigrated there (she already had citizenship having lived there most of her childhood) with her family (she has two little boys) and she loves it and will never come back to the UK.

There are really nice places to settle in the US also just not Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia (except suburbs) or New York (except Manhattan). vakenaugment.com/large-city/
Pinching Pete - | 558
26 Jul 2011 #29
I'm American and I thought about giving Canada a go for a couple of years. The only things is Canada's a lot more expensive than the US: food and housing wise. And some people (a lot of people actually) don't need extensive health care.. in Canada you pay whether you need it or not. Food is cheap in the US. I just got a large pizza with the works for $10.00. That kind of thing. It's not everything , but it's still kind of nice.

I can't knock London.. never have been there. I don't think shots of the city in "Get Him To The Greek" tell the whole story either. However, it must have something going for it. Probably if you're in your 20s - 30s it's really good.
Piast Poland 3 | 182
26 Jul 2011 #30
Did everyone hear? the US will soon be bankrupt :D May it fall fast and hard. War mongering cancer deserves all thats coming its way with the crises.


Home / USA, Canada / Moving from United Kingdom to USA. Is it worth it?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.