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Where Polish in NJ live?


Llamatic - | 144    
24 Jun 2011  #31
I am in Ocean City MD,Polish students used to coming here in large number

Maybe the Polish employment service shut down? I've seen a number of Scottish and Russians in CM too.
guesswho 4 | 1,294    
24 Jun 2011  #32
99.9% of Americans can not tell the difference between Polish and Czech,Ukrainian or Russian.

It's the same in western Europe too but you can't hold it against anyone, no one learns Polish at school other than in Poland.

When I lived in Lublin area, very few people (especially of course older Poles) knew what language we were speaking too. It was quite the opposite with young Poles. No wonder, they learn English at school.
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
24 Jun 2011  #33
I only wonder how did he figure out they were Polish

I wouldn't tell if they were Polish either they were dressed like everyone else, all tan like typical people at the beach. But he knew them because they were the same ones who did steal something before, i don't think he caught them red handed but when they left the previous time something was missing. Like i said they had a look on their faces like they knew what was up.
grubas 12 | 1,392    
24 Jun 2011  #34
Maybe the Polish employment service shut down? I've seen a number of Scottish and Russians in CM too.

No,it is simply not worth it if you want to make some money.The cost of program is about $3k so you are starting -$3k,how long do think it takes to make it back when you are making $7-8/h?I agree there is still plenty of non EU students.
guesswho 4 | 1,294    
24 Jun 2011  #35
because they were the same ones who did steal something before

you said earlier that Poles never do it, PB :-)
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
24 Jun 2011  #36
I said don't rob people like hold a knife or gun to them and take stuff, steal yea it happens.
grubas 12 | 1,392    
24 Jun 2011  #37
It's the same in western Europe too but you can't hold it against anyone, no one learns Polish at school other than in Poland.

I am not holding it against anybody,I am merely stating a fact.I can understand the average American has not enough contact with any of these nationalities to catch the difference in accents and look.
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
24 Jun 2011  #38
Average overall, those who live in or near Polish neighborhoods they know the second they see us we're Polish.
guesswho 4 | 1,294    
24 Jun 2011  #39
I said don't rob people like hold a knife or gun

to rob someone, it doesn't mean that they have to have a knife or a gun to do it. Well, whether you believe it or not, we got robbed twice in Lublin. No weapons were involved but I was still scared to death. Don't get me wrong, when I say something like that, I'm not trying to say that it happens all the time or that all Poles are like that. When we lived in Mikolajki, nothing really bad ever happened other than being charged more than what we should pay for whatever we ordered. The last is pretty common in Poland.
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
24 Jun 2011  #40
to rob someone, it doesn't mean that they have to have a knife or a gun to do it.

I know it doesn't, i just gave an example like with a knife or gun, to take with some kind of use of force.
Llamatic - | 144    
24 Jun 2011  #41
No,it is simply not worth it if you want to make some money.

I actually discussed just this with a Polish girl I knew who was working here one summer. And she said the same but explained that the summer job situation in Poland was much worse, as were wages, so it made coming here worth it. Plus she'd buy things cheaper here to take back home. Maybe things have changed as this was several years ago now.
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
24 Jun 2011  #42
I agree there is still plenty of non EU students.

I've heard that somewhere as well. Last I heard they we're bringing in Bulgarians to work at the shore. Was on a cruise 2 years down in Florida and the whole crew was Bulgarian. So I think you're right it will be other poorer Eastern Europeans and Turks.
grubas 12 | 1,392    
24 Jun 2011  #43
being charged more than what we should pay for whatever we ordered

Is it really?Never happend to me to be honest with you.I would rather bet that you misunderstood something.When I was driving a taxi I had plenty of Americans thinking that I am trying to overcharge them when I started adding surcharges at the end of run.Finally the town gave us stickers with all charges to place inside the cab and they could read what I am charging them for.

the summer job situation in Poland was much worse, as were wages, so it made coming here worth it.

Yes, the things has changed.It used to be worth but it's not anymore.There was also a problem with a job placements,meaning that not every of these students had a work place guaranteed and many couldn't find any job (especially when the season was bad or haven't started yet),if you look up the internet you will find these stories.
Llamatic - | 144    
24 Jun 2011  #44
Yes, the things has changed.It used to be worth but it's not anymore.

Maybe our economy and job market was the problem that changed things.
This is about when I knew the Poles in CM, before the recession crashed:

I didn't meet any Polish student here over the last 2 years and in 2006 and 2007 I knew plenty.

grubas 12 | 1,392    
24 Jun 2011  #45
Like i said they had a look on their faces like they knew what was up.

Ok but it doesn't mean they were Polish my friend.Every Polish student I knew here in OC when got in trouble was saying that he is Russian or Ukrainian.Anyway I would never go back to this pizza place,the owner must be a xenophobic piece of s h i t.
Llamatic - | 144    
24 Jun 2011  #46
Every Polish student I knew here in OC when got in trouble was saying that he is Russian or Ukrainian.

Sneaky!
grubas 12 | 1,392    
24 Jun 2011  #47
Maybe our economy and job market was the problem that changed things.

Partially but mainly it was a cheap USD.I mean in august of 2008 the exchange rate was 1USD-2PLN so a smart student could make the same money in Poland (not to mention UK or IRL) without having to invest 3000USD.
Llamatic - | 144    
24 Jun 2011  #48
What was the exchange rate before that? And the summer jobs market in Poland must have improved because no matter the exchange, a job in the US is still better than no job in Poland.
grubas 12 | 1,392    
24 Jun 2011  #49
What was the exchange rate before that?

The highest was 1USD-4.8 PLN.The exchange rate matters a lot because you pay for the program in PLN.One thing is that the wages and job market in Poland has indeed improved but another thing is that Polish student can work a summer job in any of 27 EU countries without having to spend any money on a program and like I already said it is not French fries money but thousends of USD.
guesswho 4 | 1,294    
24 Jun 2011  #50
I had plenty of Americans thinking that I am trying to overcharge

OK, maybe I'll mention few names to make it sound real. There was a pub in Lublin, they called it Irish Pub "U Szewca". The place was pretty nice, old furniture, the music was better than in any other place in town so we kinda liked it. As you most likely know, in Poland usually people don't pay by delivery as it is in the US so we tried to adjust us to the new situation and paid by the end of the night just like everyone else does it over there. My parents had five beers each and I had three orange juices and our bill was 400 PLN, do you believe that it was right? We sat at the table with some other people and there was an English guy, Jason and his bill was exactly the same as ours, even the same type of drinks including few coffees and ice cream was our bill showing and none of us had it. Maybe I add to it that this pub was known for doing it to people but since it was the best pub in town, it was still always loaded with people anyway. This is just an example out of many. Maybe they were doing it because we were all speaking English but no matter what the reason may have been, it wasn't right. I'm seriously not saying it to bash you guys. If I wouldn't like Poles, I wouldn't be on this forum.
hisprof1    
28 Aug 2013  #51
New Brunswick, beginning during the Hungarian Revolution in the mid 1950s. Many came over as refugees.
salahs1    
24 Jun 2018  #52
Hi. I am looking to get married to a beautiful polish girl age 25 to 33 please help. I am a professional working at labcorp as medical technologist. Please text me. 2019517610.

Very serious about this.
Rich Mazur 5 | 756    
7 Jul 2018  #53
My parents had five beers each and I had three orange juices and our bill was 400 PLN, do you believe that it was right?

You should have seen the prices before ordering. Without it, it's like signing a contract with the price to be filled out later.

Not asking about prices was common in Poland when I was there. It would be embarrassing to ask and refuse to buy because it was too much. We were lucky to find anything available in the stores.

Fast forward to the US where price is first and where there is no shame in saying that it's too much or 'no, thanks'.

Last week I made an exception and ordered a beer in a bar in North Utica - my favorite little town in Illinois I visit after a walk in the Starved Rock park. What kind of beer would you like? Cheap and cold. That will be 2 dollars. OK.

I learned this sequence after I paid 8 for a beer at South Beach in Miami without first asking what the price was. I can afford but I will not pay 8 for a bottle as a matter of principle.
Lyzko 17 | 4,555    
7 Jul 2018  #54
Lodi, Garfield, Paramus, and Linden seem to be up there.
meinhornhd    
9 Jul 2018  #55
hungarians

Hungarians lived in New Brunswick!!! There is still a cultural center there, an old church, and a few food stores.

Most moved out. .




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